USA...our country/government...good, bad, ugly

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

steross

he/him
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
33,373
33,389
1,743
oklahoma city
Florida teachers fighting against what? Assume you are referring to the FL teacher union? Are you saying that teachers would be against getting help in schools? Where are you hearing that?

I “assume” those same union leaders are also against merit pay for teachers as well. I “assume” many unions leaders agreed with the NEA about keeping schools closed as recently as four months ago. Neither items are good for teachers or students.
And it is pretty clear you did not even take a look at even the title of the article we are discussing before claiming that you have all the facts.

If only you read as well as you assumed.

Here, the title of the article linked above that started this discussion:
Florida Teachers Slam Bill Allowing Veterans to Teach With No Degree
 

steross

he/him
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
33,373
33,389
1,743
oklahoma city
Florida’s public schools are a melting pot, with students of myriad races learning in classrooms.

But the state’s teaching force doesn’t match that diversity.

Across the state, nearly 70 percent of public school teachers are white, yet only 37 percent of students in classrooms are white, according to a Phoenix analysis of 2018-19 data from the Florida Department of Education.



So, if letting in not quite finished teachers is the solution, why not expand it to include underrepresented minorities and not just vets?

Everyone keeping their same position on helping teachers and schools with that addition to the program?
 

cableok

Territorial Marshal
Mar 11, 2006
5,004
2,591
1,743
And it is pretty clear you did not even take a look at even the title of the article we are discussing before claiming that you have all the facts.

If only you read as well as you assumed.

Here, the title of the article linked above that started this discussion:
Florida Teachers Slam Bill Allowing Veterans to Teach With No Degree
I am now not sure if you are being serious or trolling. Because you obviously did not open the link and instead just read the headline.

The article you listed quoted two TikTok videos (that is your sum total of Florida teachers slamming the bill in the article). The TikTok videos are not even mutually exclusive and actually reference each other (in fact one quotes the other) and one is not even a current teacher.

BTW, Alternative Teaching Certification programs are in the majority of states. Those programs are incredibly successful. They are run to great success in most red states and blue states.

EDIT: It also appears this bill had overwhelming majority support ( near unanimous) across both aisles.
 
Last edited:
May 31, 2007
2,492
530
1,743
Concord
Right now there’s a shortage of good talent in other industries and the pricing for that talent is going through the roof. Very sad that teacher salaries aren’t market based. But allowing unqualified people to fill those roles isn’t going to help the market rate.
 

PF5

Deputy
Jan 3, 2014
1,930
485
713
finally!...taxing the billionaire!...

Winner Of $1.28 Billion Lottery Gets $433.7 Million After Tax forbes

Someone in Illinois bought the winning ticket, and if he or she does like most winners, they will take the lump sum, not the annuity. The $1.28 billion prize, which is the second-largest jackpot in Mega Millions lottery history, can be claimed in a lump sum or over time. The 1.28 billion is only if you take it over time, but if you want it all now, you get $747.2 million.

Yet like most things, even that lower cash figure gets whittled down by the IRS. In fact, lottery winnings are taxed, with the IRS taking up to 37%. Curiously, though, only 24% is withheld and sent directly to the government. The winning cash prize of $747,200,000 after the 24% IRS withholding tax, drops to $567,872,000. But the winner shouldn’t spend all that. After all, the federal income tax rate goes up to 37%, and you can assume that the winner is in the top 37% bracket. Well, many hundreds of millions of dollars into the top tax bracket, as it turns out.

The spread between the 24% withholding tax rate and the 37% tax rate on these numbers is another whopping $97,136,000 in tax. That’s a big check to write on April 15th. Since the tax withholding rate on lottery winnings is only 24%, some lottery winners do not plan ahead, and can have trouble paying their taxes when they file their tax returns the year after they win.

That’s one reason the winner should bank some of the money to be sure they have it on April 15th. If you add the 24% withholding tax plus the 13% extra tax the winner will pay April 15th together, you get a federal tax of $276,464,000. And the cash the winner has left is $470,736,000. Then, depending on whether the winner’s state taxes lottery winnings, you may have to add state taxes too.

The ticket was purchased in Illinois, and Illinois has a 4.95% state income tax, so that lops off another about $37 million in tax. In rough numbers, assuming the winner is an Illinois resident, that should mean the winner takes home about $433.7 million. That’s huge, but it’s a far cry from being a billionaire.
 

PF5

Deputy
Jan 3, 2014
1,930
485
713
Petition with more than 8,000 signatures urges OU to rehire Cale Gundy

no thanks...

NORMAN, Okla. (KOKH) — A change.org petition with more than 8,000 signatures is urging the University of Oklahoma to rehire assistant coach Cale Gundy.
Gundy, who had been with the program as an assistant since 1999, resigned Sunday after using offensive language during a film session last week.
In a tweet announcing his resignation, Gundy said he noticed a player was distracted while he was supposed to be taking notes, so he picked up the athlete's iPad and read the words on the screen aloud.

He acknowledged that he said a word that he "should never — under any circumstance — have uttered," and said he was "horrified" when he realized what he had done.
"What I said was not malicious; it wasn't even intentional," Gundy said. "Still, I am mature enough to know that the word I said was shameful and hurtful, no matter what my intentions."

Oklahoma coach Brent Venables said in a statement that Gundy's decision to resign was the right one.
"Coach Gundy resigned from the program because he knows what he did was wrong. He chose to read aloud to his players, not once but multiple times, a racially charged word that is objectionable to everyone, and does not reflect the attitude and values of our university or our football program," Venebles said. "This is not acceptable. Period. Coach Gundy did the right thing in resigning. He knows our goals for excellence and that coaches have special responsibilities to set an example. He also knows that, while he will always be a part of the OU family, that his words affected many of us and did not represent the principles of our university. Again, his resignation was the right thing to do, and we will move forward positively."
 

bleedinorange

Federal Marshal
Jan 11, 2010
12,803
16,526
1,743
Close, very close
Right now there’s a shortage of good talent in other industries and the pricing for that talent is going through the roof. Very sad that teacher salaries aren’t market based. But allowing unqualified people to fill those roles isn’t going to help the market rate.
Please define unqualified as related to teaching. As a 20yr teacher/adjunct professor/vet I'm curious about what you're basing your opinion on.
 

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
9,055
3,912
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
Latest rankings help explain teacher shortage oea

Oklahoma teachers remain 34th nationally in average teacher pay while the state’s per pupil expenditure remains in the bottom six, according to the latest Ranking of the States released by the National Education Association recently.

NEA also released for the first time the Education Support Professional Earnings report, ranking Oklahoma’s school support staff earnings 50th nationally.

The state’s average teacher salary is $54,762 for 2020-21, which ranks Oklahoma 34th nationally and fourth among our surrounding states. That figure is just $666 higher than 2019-20. The regional average is $54,622 and the national average is $65,293.

Oklahoma schools’ per pupil expenditures jumped up one spot to 45th nationally with an average of $10,553 spent per student in 2020-21 compared to $9,830 in 2019-20. Only Missouri is lower in the surrounding states at $10,481.

The state’s public school full-time ESPs earn an average of just $26,121, next to last nationally among all 50 states and Washington, D.C. In this study, fulltime is defined as 30 hours or more a week. NEA used data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey – a large, continuously collected survey that uses a nationwide sample. Earnings averages are calculated using five years of ACS data (2015–2019).

“It’s shocking to see these numbers in print, but they really help inform us of why we have a teacher shortage and why our schools have a hard time finding bus drivers, custodians and other support staff,” said Katherine Bishop, OEA President. “While our teachers and support professionals did receive good raises after the 2018 walkout, we have failed to continue investing enough in public education.”

Bishop pointed out that Oklahoma school funding faced 10 years of cuts prior to 2018. By not continuing to invest enough, the state risks falling back to the bottom of the national rankings.

“We obviously can’t fix our funding issues overnight,” she said, “that’s why it’s important to continually invest in our students. We have crowded classrooms and too few young people enrolling in our colleges of education. Meanwhile, our student population continues to grow. We simply can’t be complacent when it comes to our children’s future.”
With 509 school districts in the state, each with its own set of not just school administrators but district administrators, it makes me wonder what portion of the budget goes to this upper management. I mean, there’s no way for corruption to get in, is there? Hiring practices. Job titles in name only. Concession kick backs.

Feeling like that actually might be a good place to start checking off the obvious reasons for short falls as well as the first to be let go in short times.
 
May 4, 2011
3,887
1,702
1,743
Charleston, SC
With 509 school districts in the state, each with its own set of not just school administrators but district administrators, it makes me wonder what portion of the budget goes to this upper management. I mean, there’s no way for corruption to get in, is there? Hiring practices. Job titles in name only. Concession kick backs.

Feeling like that actually might be a good place to start checking off the obvious reasons for short falls as well as the first to be let go in short times.
How exactly does that affect per pupil spending? Wouldn't that make it higher relative to teacher pay rather than the opposite? Teachers get paid almost middle of the pack and yet we spend so much less on everything else that we're near the bottom.
 

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
9,055
3,912
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
How exactly does that affect per pupil spending? Wouldn't that make it higher relative to teacher pay rather than the opposite? Teachers get paid almost middle of the pack and yet we spend so much less on everything else that we're near the bottom.
I have zero knowledge on the school districting in Oklahoma.

It’s just very odd.

In Washington it’s around 320 give or take with a population almost double.

Texas has between 1100 to 1400 depending on sources that popped up. Regardless it’s 2x or 3x the number of Oklahoma’s, Texas population is 10x.

And who has authority over the districts authority? With 509 of them, it seems they wield a lot of power. Particularly, if tax payers fund the district through property tax as it’s been in my experience in the other 2 states.

So if they decide to rig the game, wouldn’t the misdirected funds mean less teachers?
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
39,308
10,961
1,743
Stupid about AGW!!
I'm loving this. I have a sizeable position in Unity. It was up over 10% today.
Good place to be...they about to turn all their knowledge into military contracts and the soldiers of tomorrow will know 1000% how to use the interface types they have from using it their entire lives as the backbone of a large amount of their entertainment


Unity is the most widely-used game creation platform in the world – 50% of all mobile games are made with it, 60% of Augmented Reality & Virtual Reality content is powered by Unity, and "Unity developer" is #7 on the list of fastest-growing jobs in a recent LinkedIn U.S. Emerging Jobs report.
 
May 4, 2011
3,887
1,702
1,743
Charleston, SC
I have zero knowledge on the school districting in Oklahoma.

It’s just very odd.

In Washington it’s around 320 give or take with a population almost double.

Texas has between 1100 to 1400 depending on sources that popped up. Regardless it’s 2x or 3x the number of Oklahoma’s, Texas population is 10x.

And who has authority over the districts authority? With 509 of them, it seems they wield a lot of power. Particularly, if tax payers fund the district through property tax as it’s been in my experience in the other 2 states.

So if they decide to rig the game, wouldn’t the misdirected funds mean less teachers?
I'll be the last to defend Oklahoma schools, but I'm probably overreactive to what seems like common assertions that Oklahoma schools get enough money and it's really just bloated, greedy, and corrupt administrators that are holding the schools back.

That said, Oklahoma is not vastly different from Texas in teacher to student ratio (1 to 16.9). Texas is only slightly lower (1 to 15.2) and has slightly more per pupil spending (9.6k vs 8.2k). Though not massive, the gap in teachers to students is smaller than per pupil spending, which means Oklahoma still spends slightly less on everything else compared with Texas. So, however much Oklahoma adminis are pocketing stuff, Texas seems to do it at a similar rate.
 

cableok

Territorial Marshal
Mar 11, 2006
5,004
2,591
1,743
With 509 school districts in the state, each with its own set of not just school administrators but district administrators, it makes me wonder what portion of the budget goes to this upper management. I mean, there’s no way for corruption to get in, is there? Hiring practices. Job titles in name only. Concession kick backs.

Feeling like that actually might be a good place to start checking off the obvious reasons for short falls as well as the first to be let go in short times.
Oklahoma ranks 6th in percentage of education funds spent on administration. It is a huge issue and one that Hofmeister pledged to fix when she first ran for office. Once in office she completely ignored this.
 

Duke Silver

Find safe haven in a warm bathtub full of my jazz.
A/V Subscriber
Sep 17, 2004
32,625
14,604
1,743
Cozy's Bar
Oklahoma ranks 6th in percentage of education funds spent on administration. It is a huge issue and one that Hofmeister pledged to fix when she first ran for office. Once in office she completely ignored this.
Exactly what a Garrett crony would do
 

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
9,055
3,912
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
Oklahoma ranks 6th in percentage of education funds spent on administration. It is a huge issue and one that Hofmeister pledged to fix when she first ran for office. Once in office she completely ignored this.
That’s insanity.

So there’s a movie about this subject. Great movie. Funny part was I didn’t know it was a true story.
https://www.imdb.com/video/vi3986275865/



It was so bad. Tens of millions. There seems to be no oversight over certain districts and they make their own policy. It’s just another symptom of a broken system.


In General Discussion I’ve posted links to the Murdaugh Murder Mystery. About deep judicial generational power players. Above reproach. Until they’re not.

Both of these stories are related I believe. In so much that it’s going on everywhere.