Trump rips Kavanaugh in new Michael Wolff book

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UrbanCowboy1

Some cowboys gots smarts real good like me.
Aug 8, 2006
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#21
wait, what
FDR to Hoover? Polk and Tyler in the 1865 , Lincoln to buchanan was one of the worst in 1860.

Dwight D. Eisenhower severed diplomatic relations with Cuba in January 1961, shortly before John F. Kennedy took his place, and had already set in motion what would become the Bay of Pigs invasion.

Obama, Trump and the History of Presidential Transitions | Time
For instance, while Trump and Obama talked for 90 minutes, defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover is said to have refused to talk directly to President-elect Franklin Delano Roosevelt during their first meeting after the 1932 election. Instead, the sitting president spoke only to FDR’s aide Raymond Moley, according to one account. He brought in his Treasury Secretary to lecture the incoming President on “the importance of the gold standard, the stability of the banking system and the problem of Europe’s war debt,” as TIME has previously reported. While Obama said he was “encouraged” by his “excellent” discussion with Trump, Hoover described Roosevelt as “very badly informed and of comparably little vision.” (Roosevelt, for his part, had called Hoover a “fat, timid capon” during the campaign.)


But the history of tumultuous presidential transitions is even older than that.

Take the election of 1800, in which Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson defeated the second president John Adams, his friend-turned-rival and a Federalist. On the surface, the 1801 inauguration appeared to go smoothly. It was celebrated at the time, and has continued to be commended, as what Jefferson called the “revolution of 1800”: the first modern example of one party peacefully ceding power to another. But at the same time, the departing Adams made “so-called ‘midnight appointments’ of Federalist judges and court officials” and did not attend Jefferson’s inauguration, according to CQ. The dispute over those last-minute hirings would go all the way to the Supreme Court, resulting in the landmark case Marbury v. Madison.


Hell Obama to Trump wasn't peaceful either

Not My President, Not Now, Not Ever (nytimes.com)

Clinton to bush?
 

UrbanCowboy1

Some cowboys gots smarts real good like me.
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#22
He didn't say close , he said

I then posted examples of others. Lincoln didn't even talk to Buchanan. That was what ? 160 years ago. You should brush up on reading comprehension.
I stand by what I said. Not talking to the elect isn't what I was referring to - I think you have to know that. You're a smart dude, you know the examples you gave aren't in the same league as what happened in January.

I'll step back from the hyperbole and say that despite over two centuries of tumult, we could always point to the election process as something sacred. We can't do that anymore. We're going to be dealing with the fallout from this for a really long time. I'm not sure people really grasp the severity of what happened beyond the visceral.
 
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TheMonkey

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#23
where did I down play it, I said it was not the only one. the poster that this all spawned from said it, had not happened in 250 years. That is factually incorrect.
https://acwm.org/blog/election-1860-and-transfer-power/
But did secession prevent a “smooth transition of power” from one U.S. president to another? The losing parties did not contest the election. Neither did the losing candidates. Southern Democrat John Breckinridge remained vice president of the United States until Abraham Lincoln took the oath of office on March 4, 1861, then resumed his seat – in the same chamber – as U.S. Senator from Kentucky, where he remained until August 1861. Northern Democrat Stephen Douglas – Lincoln’s political nemesis – pledged his loyalty to the Lincoln administration in the face of the growing sectional crisis.

No one tried to prevent Lincoln from assuming the presidency after the 1860 election. The Southern states, however, denied Lincoln the opportunity to exercise his presidential power over them. Their action confronted Lincoln with a challenge: would he be content to become president of part of the Union? Lincoln responded to this challenge in his March 4, 1861:

“I therefore consider that, in view of the Constitution and the laws, the Union is unbroken; and to the extent of my ability I shall take care, as the Constitution itself expressly enjoins me, that the laws of the Union be faithfully executed in all states….In doing this, there needs to be no bloodshed or violence; and there shall be none, unless it be forced upon the national authority….In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow-countrymen, and not mine, is the momentous issue of civil war.”

The transition of power from Democrat James Buchanan to Republican Abraham Lincoln was remarkably smooth. The question fraught with potential violence concerned the shape of the Union over which Lincoln would preside. That drama played out in the six weeks after Lincoln’s inauguration – and in the four years after that.
 

CowboyJD

The Voice of Reason...occasionally......rarely
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I stand by what I said. Not talking to the elect isn't what I was referring to - I think you have to know that. You're a smart dude, you know the examples you gave aren't in the same league as what happened in January.

I'll step back from the hyperbole and say that despite over two centuries of tumult, we could always point to the election process as something sacred. We can't do that anymore. We're going to be dealing with the fallout from this for a really long time. I'm not sure people really grasp the severity of what happened beyond the visceral.
He's talking incivility during an accepted transition.

We're all talking about....actual violence to stop a transition that in no way was accepted.

You're right, they aren't comparable.
 

TheMonkey

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#27
He's talking incivility during an accepted transition.

We're all talking about....actual violence to stop a transition that in no way was accepted.

You're right, they aren't comparable.
Bingo. I’m not sure why he doesn’t get that. Nor do I understand why he would work so hard to persuade us it’s more normal than it actually is.