Trump made us care

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steross

he/him
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Mar 31, 2004
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#1
Analysis: How Trump made people care about politics again
https://apple.news/AXkdKu7r5RAaeQHOehmt5dg
10:01 AM EST January 2, 2021

Love him or hate him, President Donald Trump made most Americans feel strongly about politics in a way no politician has in our lifetimes. Record numbers of Americans felt strongly favorable or unfavorable toward Trump during his time in office. (The strongly favorable and unfavorable was 71% in a Fox News poll last month, for instance.)

Trump's presidency drove historic turnout and record donations to political campaigns in a country whose voters have often shown a disinterest in politics.


Twenty-four years ago, America's political apathy seemed to reach a record high. Just 51.7% of the voting-eligible population cast a ballot, according to the US Elections Project. That was the lowest since 18-year-olds got the vote before the 1972 election. In raw numbers, a little more than 96 million voters decided to take part in that year's presidential election.

The 2020 campaign, by comparison, had a little less than 160 million voters participate. With population growth, the US Elections Project estimates a turnout rate of 66.7% of the voting-eligible population.

It's difficult to understate what an achievement this turnout rate is. A 66.7% turnout rate shattered the previous high since 18-year-old's got the vote of 61.6% in 2008. (The 2008 campaign featured the election of the first Black presidential major party nominee in Barack Obama.) Turnout before 2020 never broke 140 million.

What's amazing is how far back you have to go to beat 66.7% for a turnout rate in a presidential election. There wasn't a higher turnout rate in either the 20th or 21st century.
It would be easy to think that the coronavirus pandemic caused record turnout. It may have played a role, though it's been clear for more than a year that the 2020 dynamic was going to be unique.

I noted in April 2019 -- long before the pandemic and before Democrats started voting in their primary -- that record turnout was likely because a record number of voters said that they were extremely enthusiastic about voting in the 2020 election.

The record 2020 turnout followed record midterm turnout in 2018 -- a record number where opinions of Trump were the driving factor for voters.

Half of the voter-eligible population turned out to vote in 2018. This 50.0% turnout rate was more than 13 points higher than in 2014 (36.7%). In raw numbers, nearly 120 million turned out in 2018 compared to only a little more than 80 million in 2014.

The 2018 turnout rate was by far the highest in a midterm since 18-year-olds got the vote. It had never previously topped 42% during this era.
Indeed, you have to go back more than 100 years (to 1914) to find higher turnout in a midterm election.

The strong feelings toward Trump also drove record donations to political candidates up and down the ballot.

Through November 30, 2020, the FEC reports that nearly $24 billion was raised by federal candidates, PACs and party committees during the 2020 election cycle. No other year comes anywhere close to that total. For comparison, a little more than $9 billion was raised by federal candidates, PACs and party committees during the 2016 election cycle.

Looking just at the presidential candidates, over $4 billion was taken in. Never before had more than $2 billion been raised. This cycle's record occurred even as just one side had a competitive nomination fight, unlike, in 2008, when the previous record had been set. Keep in mind, though, that about $1 billion of this cycle's money raised came from self-funder Michael Bloomberg.

In the House races, candidates raised $1.9 billion. Again, that's a record for any cycle. The next highest total was in 2018 with Trump in the White House. During the midterm cycle, $1.7 billion was raised by House candidates.

Before 2018, the highest total raised was just a little bit more than $1.1 billion.
In the final major elections during Trump's presidency, the fundraising train has shown no sign of stopping. The candidates for the Georgia Senate runoffs are raising ridiculous amounts. The Democrats alone are raising hundreds of millions of dollars.

The fact that candidates up and down the ballot were able to raise so much money is the
encapsulation of what the Trump era is about. The interest in elections during the past four years isn't just about Trump the individual. It's about everything around Trump and everything that can strengthen or lessen the power he has.
What will be interesting to see is what happens from here. Without Trump in the White House will political interest drop? Or have we entered a new era where more Americans care about politics.

We'll just have to wait and see.
 

StillwaterTownie

Federal Marshal
Jun 18, 2010
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Where else but Stillwater
#3
By turning our Democracy into a Kleptocracy...
So, a lot of Trump supporters feel quite deeply hurt and will never ever get over Trump's reelection defeat for the rest of their lives. They believed the pre-election polls were wrong. Overall, they weren't. They, no doubt, feel Trump is easily one of the best presidents ever, even better than Reagan. One of Trump's biggest supporters, Roger Stone and who he pardoned, thinks he was the best president since Lincoln. That's surely saying a lot for him, since this man has Richard Nixon's face tattooed on his back.

It's too bad how Trump said he learned a lot from "I am not a crook", Richard Nixon. He should have learned something from Reagan who easily won his reelection.

Parts of a hour long phone call exposed today of Trump demanding that Georgia state officials find votes to make him win will just be seen by Trump supporters as more proof election results were based on fraud.

"I think it's fake news, okay? Now would I do that? Absolutely." President Donald Trump

" Nobody knows what is up or down." President Donald Trump (Especially him.)
 
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Jul 25, 2018
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#4
So, a lot of Trump supporters feel quite deeply hurt and will never ever get over Trump's reelection defeat for the rest of their lives. They believed the pre-election polls were wrong. Overall, they weren't. They, no doubt, feel Trump is easily one of the best presidents ever, even better than Reagan. One of Trump's biggest supporters, Roger Stone and who he pardoned, thinks he was the best president since Lincoln. That's surely saying a lot for him, since this man has Richard Nixon's face tattooed on his back.

It's too bad how Trump said he learned a lot from "I am not a crook", Richard Nixon. He should have learned something from Reagan who easily won his reelection.

Parts of a hour long phone call exposed today of Trump demanding that Georgia state officials find votes to make him win will just be seen by Trump supporters as more proof election results were based on fraud.

"I think it's fake news, okay? Now would I do that? Absolutely." President Donald Trump

" Nobody knows what is up or down." President Donald Trump (Especially him.)
Is this English?
 

Midnight Toker

Territorial Marshal
May 28, 2010
9,188
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#5
Analysis: How Trump made people care about politics again
https://apple.news/AXkdKu7r5RAaeQHOehmt5dg
10:01 AM EST January 2, 2021

Love him or hate him, President Donald Trump made most Americans feel strongly about politics in a way no politician has in our lifetimes. Record numbers of Americans felt strongly favorable or unfavorable toward Trump during his time in office. (The strongly favorable and unfavorable was 71% in a Fox News poll last month, for instance.)

Trump's presidency drove historic turnout and record donations to political campaigns in a country whose voters have often shown a disinterest in politics.


Twenty-four years ago, America's political apathy seemed to reach a record high. Just 51.7% of the voting-eligible population cast a ballot, according to the US Elections Project. That was the lowest since 18-year-olds got the vote before the 1972 election. In raw numbers, a little more than 96 million voters decided to take part in that year's presidential election.

The 2020 campaign, by comparison, had a little less than 160 million voters participate. With population growth, the US Elections Project estimates a turnout rate of 66.7% of the voting-eligible population.

It's difficult to understate what an achievement this turnout rate is. A 66.7% turnout rate shattered the previous high since 18-year-old's got the vote of 61.6% in 2008. (The 2008 campaign featured the election of the first Black presidential major party nominee in Barack Obama.) Turnout before 2020 never broke 140 million.

What's amazing is how far back you have to go to beat 66.7% for a turnout rate in a presidential election. There wasn't a higher turnout rate in either the 20th or 21st century.
It would be easy to think that the coronavirus pandemic caused record turnout. It may have played a role, though it's been clear for more than a year that the 2020 dynamic was going to be unique.

I noted in April 2019 -- long before the pandemic and before Democrats started voting in their primary -- that record turnout was likely because a record number of voters said that they were extremely enthusiastic about voting in the 2020 election.

The record 2020 turnout followed record midterm turnout in 2018 -- a record number where opinions of Trump were the driving factor for voters.

Half of the voter-eligible population turned out to vote in 2018. This 50.0% turnout rate was more than 13 points higher than in 2014 (36.7%). In raw numbers, nearly 120 million turned out in 2018 compared to only a little more than 80 million in 2014.

The 2018 turnout rate was by far the highest in a midterm since 18-year-olds got the vote. It had never previously topped 42% during this era.
Indeed, you have to go back more than 100 years (to 1914) to find higher turnout in a midterm election.

The strong feelings toward Trump also drove record donations to political candidates up and down the ballot.

Through November 30, 2020, the FEC reports that nearly $24 billion was raised by federal candidates, PACs and party committees during the 2020 election cycle. No other year comes anywhere close to that total. For comparison, a little more than $9 billion was raised by federal candidates, PACs and party committees during the 2016 election cycle.

Looking just at the presidential candidates, over $4 billion was taken in. Never before had more than $2 billion been raised. This cycle's record occurred even as just one side had a competitive nomination fight, unlike, in 2008, when the previous record had been set. Keep in mind, though, that about $1 billion of this cycle's money raised came from self-funder Michael Bloomberg.

In the House races, candidates raised $1.9 billion. Again, that's a record for any cycle. The next highest total was in 2018 with Trump in the White House. During the midterm cycle, $1.7 billion was raised by House candidates.

Before 2018, the highest total raised was just a little bit more than $1.1 billion.
In the final major elections during Trump's presidency, the fundraising train has shown no sign of stopping. The candidates for the Georgia Senate runoffs are raising ridiculous amounts. The Democrats alone are raising hundreds of millions of dollars.

The fact that candidates up and down the ballot were able to raise so much money is the
encapsulation of what the Trump era is about. The interest in elections during the past four years isn't just about Trump the individual. It's about everything around Trump and everything that can strengthen or lessen the power he has.
What will be interesting to see is what happens from here. Without Trump in the White House will political interest drop? Or have we entered a new era where more Americans care about politics.

We'll just have to wait and see.
Bad presidents have a way of getting the populous riled up. 8 years of Bush gave us record number of voters, and it only took 4 years of absolute insanity for rump to get fired and shatter that record of voters.

Oh, and get rid of private money in elections. Make them beg the voters for money in the form of vouchers.
 

ODMcB

Sheriff
Jun 20, 2012
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#6
Bad presidents have a way of getting the populous riled up. 8 years of Bush gave us record number of voters, and it only took 4 years of absolute insanity for rump to get fired and shatter that record of voters.

Oh, and get rid of private money in elections. Make them beg the voters for money in the form of vouchers.
Amending Citizens United, IOW.
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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#7
Bad presidents have a way of getting the populous riled up. 8 years of Bush gave us record number of voters, and it only took 4 years of absolute insanity for rump to get fired and shatter that record of voters.

Oh, and get rid of private money in elections. Make them beg the voters for money in the form of vouchers.
Just to be unbiased, the same thing happened with Obama....Oh, btw, POTUS Trump, despite all his many flaws (which are indeed many), got more votes than any President running for re-election in American history...even more than Obama got in his first election. Certainly the other side rolled out in record numbers as well, as it appears POTUS elect Joe Biden got even more votes...But partisan painting only one side of an already polarized political landscape only further divides an already unfortunately divided country. Let's all make an effort in 2021 to reach out to the other side and realize they aren't the monsters (i.e. "we the people on all sides") the confirmation bias press (on both sides) that we happen choose to consume is making them appear to be. I propose we all go on a confirmation bias fast in 2021. If the current trend in media failed due to lack of a market we would all be better off.
 
Nov 6, 2010
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#8
What I hope is that Trump will get us all to care about civics rather than politics. Politics sucks, but civics are truly important.
 

oks10

Territorial Marshal
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Sep 9, 2007
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#9
Analysis: How Trump made people care about politics again
https://apple.news/AXkdKu7r5RAaeQHOehmt5dg
10:01 AM EST January 2, 2021

Love him or hate him, President Donald Trump made most Americans feel strongly about politics in a way no politician has in our lifetimes. Record numbers of Americans felt strongly favorable or unfavorable toward Trump during his time in office. (The strongly favorable and unfavorable was 71% in a Fox News poll last month, for instance.)

Trump's presidency drove historic turnout and record donations to political campaigns in a country whose voters have often shown a disinterest in politics.


Twenty-four years ago, America's political apathy seemed to reach a record high. Just 51.7% of the voting-eligible population cast a ballot, according to the US Elections Project. That was the lowest since 18-year-olds got the vote before the 1972 election. In raw numbers, a little more than 96 million voters decided to take part in that year's presidential election.

The 2020 campaign, by comparison, had a little less than 160 million voters participate. With population growth, the US Elections Project estimates a turnout rate of 66.7% of the voting-eligible population.

It's difficult to understate what an achievement this turnout rate is. A 66.7% turnout rate shattered the previous high since 18-year-old's got the vote of 61.6% in 2008. (The 2008 campaign featured the election of the first Black presidential major party nominee in Barack Obama.) Turnout before 2020 never broke 140 million.

What's amazing is how far back you have to go to beat 66.7% for a turnout rate in a presidential election. There wasn't a higher turnout rate in either the 20th or 21st century.
It would be easy to think that the coronavirus pandemic caused record turnout. It may have played a role, though it's been clear for more than a year that the 2020 dynamic was going to be unique.

I noted in April 2019 -- long before the pandemic and before Democrats started voting in their primary -- that record turnout was likely because a record number of voters said that they were extremely enthusiastic about voting in the 2020 election.

The record 2020 turnout followed record midterm turnout in 2018 -- a record number where opinions of Trump were the driving factor for voters.

Half of the voter-eligible population turned out to vote in 2018. This 50.0% turnout rate was more than 13 points higher than in 2014 (36.7%). In raw numbers, nearly 120 million turned out in 2018 compared to only a little more than 80 million in 2014.

The 2018 turnout rate was by far the highest in a midterm since 18-year-olds got the vote. It had never previously topped 42% during this era.
Indeed, you have to go back more than 100 years (to 1914) to find higher turnout in a midterm election.

The strong feelings toward Trump also drove record donations to political candidates up and down the ballot.

Through November 30, 2020, the FEC reports that nearly $24 billion was raised by federal candidates, PACs and party committees during the 2020 election cycle. No other year comes anywhere close to that total. For comparison, a little more than $9 billion was raised by federal candidates, PACs and party committees during the 2016 election cycle.

Looking just at the presidential candidates, over $4 billion was taken in. Never before had more than $2 billion been raised. This cycle's record occurred even as just one side had a competitive nomination fight, unlike, in 2008, when the previous record had been set. Keep in mind, though, that about $1 billion of this cycle's money raised came from self-funder Michael Bloomberg.

In the House races, candidates raised $1.9 billion. Again, that's a record for any cycle. The next highest total was in 2018 with Trump in the White House. During the midterm cycle, $1.7 billion was raised by House candidates.

Before 2018, the highest total raised was just a little bit more than $1.1 billion.
In the final major elections during Trump's presidency, the fundraising train has shown no sign of stopping. The candidates for the Georgia Senate runoffs are raising ridiculous amounts. The Democrats alone are raising hundreds of millions of dollars.

The fact that candidates up and down the ballot were able to raise so much money is the
encapsulation of what the Trump era is about. The interest in elections during the past four years isn't just about Trump the individual. It's about everything around Trump and everything that can strengthen or lessen the power he has.
What will be interesting to see is what happens from here. Without Trump in the White House will political interest drop? Or have we entered a new era where more Americans care about politics.

We'll just have to wait and see.
I'm all for more people caring more about politics (my brother is 32 and has never voted in an election and it drives me crazy that he just completely ignores it) but the trouble comes when so many are finding and sharing/spreading false/fake/misleading information. The last thing I want is for people to get riled up about something that they have no clue what they're talking about and demanding decisions be made based on the wrong information. Also, it's nearly impossible to have a discussion and make progress when one or both sides is arguing based on wrong information and being driven by emotion without the willingness to consider that their opinions might not be 100% correct.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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#10
Bad presidents have a way of getting the populous riled up. 8 years of Bush gave us record number of voters, and it only took 4 years of absolute insanity for rump to get fired and shatter that record of voters.

Oh, and get rid of private money in elections. Make them beg the voters for money in the form of vouchers.
When is the last time you think we had a good President?

There are fans of Obama and fans of Trump. Their fans/base like what they did, but both are perceived as divisive Presidents. And the opposition party made the division even worse during their terms.

With social media fanning the flame of fake news...and “journalists” and “news organizations” not even attempting to separate opinion vs news ...I don’t see this improving anytime soon. Too many people only watch/listen/read “news” that supports their viewpoints.
 

cowboyinexile

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#11
Just to be unbiased, the same thing happened with Obama....Oh, btw, POTUS Trump, despite all his many flaws (which are indeed many), got more votes than any President running for re-election in American history...even more than Obama got in his first election. Certainly the other side rolled out in record numbers as well, as it appears POTUS elect Joe Biden got even more votes...But partisan painting only one side of an already polarized political landscape only further divides an already unfortunately divided country. Let's all make an effort in 2021 to reach out to the other side and realize they aren't the monsters (i.e. "we the people on all sides") the confirmation bias press (on both sides) that we happen choose to consume is making them appear to be. I propose we all go on a confirmation bias fast in 2021. If the current trend in media failed due to lack of a market we would all be better off.
What do you mean by appears?
 

Rack

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Oct 13, 2004
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#12
What do you mean by appears?
Lot's of people think that some of the results may be from cheatin. Obviously he got more total popular votes between the two who BOTH got more votes than anyone in history. I have no opinion on this except that these things should be researched, found, if they exist, and fixed so that we don't have questions in the future about election results. That's what I mean....Bottom line, politics have become toxic and both sides need to learn to love and understand one another more.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#14
Why do you ask? Is it because there is no doubt in your mind that Trump is one of the best presidents ever? If so, do you side with Alex Jones who said he likes Trump even better after listening to that disgraceful phone call he had with the Georgia Sec. of State?
Because your post was such a rambling array of random thoughts, like your reply, which starts with a simple question, then a bunch of stuff that are your own thoughts & ideas.
 

cowboyinexile

Have some class
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#15
Lot's of people think that some of the results may be from cheatin. Obviously he got more total popular votes between the two who BOTH got more votes than anyone in history. I have no opinion on this except that these things should be researched, found, if they exist, and fixed so that we don't have questions in the future about election results. That's what I mean....Bottom line, politics have become toxic and both sides need to learn to love and understand one another more.
Fair enough.

Did you have similar concerns 4 years ago when the vote counts in key swing states were closer and the election totals were very different than polling indicated?
 

Rack

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#16
Fair enough.

Did you have similar concerns 4 years ago when the vote counts in key swing states were closer and the election totals were very different than polling indicated?
Yes, I was surprised by the results last time as well... I think we need to firm up on elections, but the states are in control of their own election laws and that does provide for some balance in the process. Don't confuse me with someone who was hyper upset about Trump losing. I'm just not a fan of the other party...doesn't mean I'm a fan of Trumps, I'm not.
 

cowboyinexile

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#17
Yes, I was surprised by the results last time as well... I think we need to firm up on elections, but the states are in control of their own election laws and that does provide for some balance in the process. Don't confuse me with someone who was hyper upset about Trump losing. I'm just not a fan of the other party...doesn't mean I'm a fan of Trumps, I'm not.
But did you think the election was rigged? You insinuated the current election may have been fraudulent. Did you feel the same way 4 years ago?

Historically this election wasn't that close. So why does this one deserve scrutiny when, for instance, the 2004 election really didn't?
 

ODMcB

Sheriff
Jun 20, 2012
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#18
But did you think the election was rigged? You insinuated the current election may have been fraudulent. Did you feel the same way 4 years ago?

Historically this election wasn't that close. So why does this one deserve scrutiny when, for instance, the 2004 election really didn't?
And why only in the states Trump lost in close races, rather than won in close races...so fake.
 

Rack

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#20
But did you think the election was rigged? You insinuated the current election may have been fraudulent. Did you feel the same way 4 years ago?

Historically this election wasn't that close. So why does this one deserve scrutiny when, for instance, the 2004 election really didn't?
It was pretty close in terms of the states in question that swayed the election. Many irregularities have been reported in those states.

But NO, I don't think the election was "rigged," but I do think all the changes in voter laws leading up to the election made it easier to cheat on than in past elections. The massive numbers of mail in ballots made the election workers jobs harder and voter verification much more easy to get by without scrutiny of each ballot. Reported late night ballot dumps and vote count stops also led to voter scrutiny. Compared to four years ago it had FAR more participation, in fact it had more votes cast than in any POTUS election prior to it, when logic said it "might" have less due to covid. Honestly I don't care all that much anymore because my future isn't tied to the leader of the United States of America, but it is something we should fix IF there is problems with it. I'm not a Trump fan, but I hope the Georgia elections go to the R's so that we have a balance in governance, because I certainly don't trust the Dem's to do any better than the R's if they are able to force their agenda. It's also important to keep in mind that we are in no way in lock step in our opinions on government as a nation. Inferring that the election didn't highlight even more just how divided the nation is and how much we need to reach out to the other side to heal and find balance doesn't help anyone. Your state, assuming you are from Oklahoma, voted for the current POTUS in huge margins with him winning every county. Many other states voted in a similar fashion. IMHO, it's incumbent on the people of the nation to attempt to find common ground moving forward rather than constant division, and a fair and balanced look at elections and election laws seeking some constitutional mild reformation of the process might be a good idea to reduce election scrutiny and distrust in the future. It doesn't matter what you and I think, there are 10's of millions of Americans who think the election was fraudulent and those concerns need to be addressed to provide more faith in the future of the system. That's all I'm saying.
 
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