Today's Democratic Party

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Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
53,512
17,983
1,743
#1
Victor Davis Hanson: The secret that Biden, Obama, Hillary won't say aloud about today's Democratic Party

By Victor Davis Hanson, Tribune Media Services

How often during the last year of wokeness have middle- and lower-class Americans listened to multimillionaires of all races and genders lecture them on their various pathologies and oppression's?

University presidents with million-dollar salaries virtue-signal on the cheap their own sort of "unearned white privilege."

Meghan Markle and the Obamas, from their plush estates, indict Americans for their biases.

Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors Brignac decries the oppressive victimization she and others have suffered — from one of her four recently acquired homes.


Do we need another performance-art sermon on America’s innate unfairness from billionaire entertainers such as Beyoncé, Jay-Z or Oprah Winfrey, or from multimillionaire Delta or Coca-Cola CEOs?

During the 1980s cultural war, the left’s mantra was "race, class and gender." Occasionally we still hear of that trifecta, but the class part has increasingly disappeared. The neglect of class is ironic given that a number of recent studies conclude class differences are widening as never before.

Middle-class incomes among all races have stagnated, and family net worth has declined. Far greater percentages of rising incomes go to the already rich. Student debt, mostly a phenomenon of the middle and lower classes, has hit $1.7 trillion.

States such California have bifurcated into medieval-style societies. California’s progressive coastal elites boast some of the highest incomes in the nation. But in the more conservative north and central interior, nearly a third of the population lives below the poverty line — explaining why one of every three American welfare recipients lives in California.

California’s heating, cooling, gasoline and housing costs are the highest in the continental United States. Most of these spiraling costs are attributable to polices embraced by an upper-class elite — in Silicon Valley, Hollywood and marquee universities — whose incomes shield them from the deleterious consequences of their utopian bromides. The poor and middle classes have no such insulation.

So why are we not talking about class?

First, we are watching historic changes in political alignment.

By 2018, Democratic representatives were in control of all 20 of the wealthiest congressional districts. In the recent presidential primaries and general election, 17 of the 20 wealthiest ZIP codes gave more money to Democratic candidates than to Republicans.

Increasingly, the Democrats are a bicoastal party of elites from corporate America, Wall Street, Silicon Valley, the media, universities, entertainment and professional sports. All have made out like bandits from globalization.

Democrats have lost much of their support from working-class whites, especially in the interior of the country. But they are also fast forfeiting the Hispanic middle class and beginning to lose solidarity among middle-class African Americans.

The Democratic Party does not wish to admit it has become the party of wealth. All too often its stale revolutionary speechifying sounds more like penance arising from guilt than genuine advocacy for middle-class citizens of all races.

The wealthy leftist elite has mastered the rhetoric of ridicule for the lower-middle classes, especially struggling Whites. Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden wrote off their political opponents as supposedly crude, superstitious and racist, smearing them as "clingers," "deplorables," irredeemables" and "chumps."

Class is fluid; race is immutable. So by fixating on race, the left believes that it can divide America into permanent victimizers and victims — at a time when race and class are increasingly disconnecting.

The two parties are switching class constituents. Some 65% of the Americans making more than $500,000 a year are Democrats, and 74% of those who earn less than $100,000 a year are Republicans, according to IRS statistics. Gone are the days of working people automatically voting Democratic, or Republicans being caricatured as a party of stockbrokers on golf courses.

The wealthy of all races are the loudest voices of the woke movement. Their frequent assumptions of "victimhood" are absurd.

Americans who struggle to pay soaring gas, food, energy and housing prices are berated for their "white privilege" by an array of well-paid academics, media elite and CEOs.

Note that the woke military is the brand of admirals, generals and retired top brass on corporate boards, not of the enlisted. It’s multimillionaire CEOs who bark at the nation for their prejudices, not saleswomen or company truck drivers.

America is a plutocracy, not a genocracy. Wealth, not race, is the factor most likely to ensure someone power, influence and the good life.

In the pre-civil rights past, race was often fused to class, and the two terms were logically used interchangeably to cite oppression and inequality. But such a canard is fossilized. And so are those who desperately cling to it.

The more the elites scream their woke banalities, the more they seem to fear that they, not most Americans, are really the privileged, coddled and pampered ones — and sometimes the victimizers.

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/biden-obama-hillary-democratic-party-victor-davis-hanson
 

cowboyinexile

Have some class
A/V Subscriber
Jun 29, 2004
18,921
10,966
1,743
41
Fairmont, MN
#2
Friendly reminder, for those that don't have this dude blocked, he was cool with viva la revolution 6 months ago. He's a troll and the best thing you can do is ignore him. I won't respond to his multiple attemptst to engage me on this. He will probably quote me multiple times but he isn't worth it. I'm only saying this as a public service announcement. OP isn't worth your time to interact with regardless of your political affiliation.

His pathetic partisan bantering isn't worth anyone's time. If you don't have him on ignore I suggest you do so as even if you agree with him, there are more enlightened conversations to be had in threads he avoids.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
53,512
17,983
1,743
#4
Friendly reminder, for those that don't have this dude blocked, he was cool with viva la revolution 6 months ago. He's a troll and the best thing you can do is ignore him. I won't respond to his multiple attemptst to engage me on this. He will probably quote me multiple times but he isn't worth it. I'm only saying this as a public service announcement. OP isn't worth your time to interact with regardless of your political affiliation.

His pathetic partisan bantering isn't worth anyone's time. If you don't have him on ignore I suggest you do so as even if you agree with him, there are more enlightened conversations to be had in threads he avoids.
Why do you spread things about me that that aren’t true?
You have a choice to respond to me or not. It’s you that follows me around posting inaccuracies about me, not the other way around.
Do you disagree with the article? Instead of spreading your misguided hate, why not respond to the opinion piece or just do the simple thing, which so far you have not shown the ability to do, just ignore my threads.
 

PF5

Deputy
Jan 3, 2014
1,116
332
713
#5
Why do you spread things about me that that aren’t true?
You have a choice to respond to me or not. It’s you that follows me around posting inaccuracies about me, not the other way around.
Do you disagree with the article? Instead of spreading your misguided hate, why not respond to the opinion piece or just do the simple thing, which so far you have not shown the ability to do, just ignore my threads.
key words 'opinion piece'...one persons opinion...here's an opinion piece as well...

The Republican revolt against democracy, explained in 13 charts

The Trump years revealed a dark truth: The Republican Party is no longer committed to democracy.

The Republican Party is the biggest threat to American democracy today. It is a radical, obstructionist faction that has become hostile to the most basic democratic norm: that the other side should get to wield power when it wins elections.

1) Trump’s supporters have embraced anti-democratic ideas
MAGA Voters - They go further than “merely” believing the 2020 election was stolen, a nearly unanimous view among the bunch. Over 90 percent oppose making it easier for people to vote; roughly 70 percent would support a hypothetical third term for Trump (which would be unconstitutional).

2) Republicans are embracing violence
The ultimate expression of anti-democratic politics is resorting to violence. More than twice as many Republicans as Democrats — nearly two in five Republicans — said in a January poll that force could be justified against their opponents.
The more party leaders like Trump attack the democratic political system as rigged against them, the more Republicans will believe it and conclude that extreme measures are justifiable.

3) Republicans see Democrats as something worse than mere rivals
While many Democrats see Republicans in a dark light, a majority still see them more as political rivals than as enemies. Among Republicans, however, a solid majority see Democrats as their enemy.
When you believe the opposing party to be an enemy, the costs of letting them win become too high, and anti-democratic behavior — rigging the game in your favor, even outright violence — starts to become thinkable.

4) Republicans dislike compromise
America’s founders designed our political system around compromise. But for years now, majorities of Republican voters have opposed compromise on principle, consistently telling pollsters that they prefer politicians who stick to their ideological guns rather than give a little to get things done. It’s no wonder the past decade saw unprecedented Republican obstructionism in Congress

5) The Republican Party is a global outlier — and not in a good way
The GOP is an extreme outlier compared to mainstream conservative parties in other wealthy democracies, like Canada’s CPC or Germany’s CDU. Its closest peers are almost uniformly radical right and anti-democratic parties. This includes Turkey’s AKP (a regime that is one of the world’s leading jailers of journalists), and Poland’s PiS (which has threatened dissenting judges with criminal punishment).
The verdict of these experts is clear: The Republican Party is one of the most anti-democratic political parties in the developed world.

6) The Republican turn against democracy begins with race
The 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act cemented Democrats as the party of racial equality, causing racially resentful Democrats in the South and elsewhere to defect to the Republican Party. This sorting process, which took place over the next few decades, is the key reason America is so polarized.
It also explains why Republicans are increasingly willing to endorse anti-democratic political tactics and ideas. In the past, restrictions on the franchise served to protect white political power in a changing country; today, as demographic change threatens to further undermine the central place of white Americans, many are becoming comfortable with an updated version of the Jim Crow South’s authoritarian tradition.

7) Partisanship causes Republicans to justify anti-democratic behavior
... a “natural experiment” in Montana’s 2017 at-large House campaign, during which Republican candidate Greg Gianforte assaulted reporter Ben Jacobs during an attempted interview just before Election Day.
Because many voters cast their ballots by mail before the assault happened, Graham and Svolik could compare these to the in-person votes after the assault in order to measure how the news of Gianforte’s attack shifted voters’ behavior.
The blue lines represent precincts where Gianforte did worse on Election Day than in mail-in ballots; the red lines represent the reverse. What you see is a clear trend: In Democratic-leaning and centrist precincts, Gianforte suffered a penalty. But in general, the more right-leaning a precinct was, the less likely he was to suffer — and the more likely he was to improve on his mail-in numbers.
For Svolik and Graham, this illustrates a broader point: Extreme partisanship creates the conditions for democratic decline. If you really care about your side wielding power, you’re more willing to overlook misbehavior in their attempts to win it. They find evidence that this could apply to partisans of either major party — but only one party nominates candidates like Trump and Gianforte (who won not only the 2017 contest but also his reelection bid in 2018 and Montana’s gubernatorial election in 2020).

8) The crucial impact of the right-wing media
The chart here is from a study covering 1997 to 2002, when Fox News was still being rolled out across the country. The study compared members of Congress in districts where Fox News was available to members in districts where it wasn’t, specifically examining how frequently they voted along party lines.
They found that Republicans in districts with Fox grew considerably more likely to vote with the party as it got closer to election time, whereas Republicans without Fox actually grew less likely to do so. The expansion of Fox News, in short, seemingly served a disciplining function: making Republican members of Congress more afraid of the consequences of breaking with the party come election time and thus less inclined to engage in bipartisan legislative efforts.

9) Republicans have an unpopular policy agenda
...compares the relative popularity of the two major legislative efforts of Trump’s first term — tax cuts and Obamacare repeal — to similar high-priority bills in years past. The contrast is striking: The GOP’s modern economic agenda is widely disliked even compared to unpopular bills of the past, a finding consistent with a lot of recent polling data.
Hacker and Pierson argue that this drives Republicans’ emphasis on culture war and anti-Democratic identity politics. This strategy, which they term “plutocratic populism,” allows the party’s super-wealthy backers to get their tax cuts while the base gets the partisan street fight they crave.

10) Some of the most consequential Republican attacks on democracy happen at the state level
This map from the Brennan Center for Justice shows every state that passed a restriction on the franchise between 2010 and 2019. These restrictions, ranging from voter ID laws to felon disenfranchisement, were generally passed by Republican majorities with the intent of hurting turnout among Democratic-leaning constituencies.
Because Republicans dominated the 2010 midterm elections, Republican statehouses got to control the post-2010 census redistricting process at both the House and state legislative level, leading to extreme gerrymandering in Republican-controlled states unlike anything in Democratic ones.
Conservative control of the Supreme Court enabled this state-level push. In 2013, the Court struck down the Voting Rights Act’s “preclearance” requirement — that states with a history of racial discrimination would be required to get permission from the Justice Department on their maps and other major changes to electoral law. In 2019, another Court ruling paved the way for further partisan gerrymandering.

11) The national GOP has broken government
Today’s Senate, where you need 60 votes to get virtually anything done, is a historical anomaly. Its roots can be traced to the unyielding GOP opposition to President Barack Obama in 2009 and 2010, when Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell turned the Senate into a dysfunctional body in which priority legislation was routinely subject to a filibuster. When Republicans won a Senate majority in 2014, McConnell found a new way to deny Obama victories: blocking his judicial appointments.
These actions were an expression of an attitude popular among Republican voters and leaders alike: that Democrats can never be legitimate leaders, even if elected, and thus do not deserve to wield power.

12) Republicans didn’t care when Trump abused his power
The Trump presidency was a test of Republican attitudes toward democracy. Time and again, the president abused his authority in ways that would have been unthinkable under previous presidents. Time and again, members of Congress, state party leaders, right-wing media stars, and rank-and-file voters looked the other way — or even cheered him on.
The chart here, which shows two NBC polls taken about a year apart, is particularly striking. It shows that support for Trump’s first and second impeachment among Republicans remained exactly the same among Republicans: 8 percent.

13) Trump and Trumpism could return in 2024
This chart shows the results of a Morning Consult poll on the 2024 Republican primary held after Trump’s second impeachment trial. It found that 54 percent of Republicans would choose Trump again, even when given a wide range of alternative possibilities. Six percent would choose his son Donald Trump Jr. — who obviously wouldn’t run if his father did — putting the Trump family support in the GOP primary electorate at around 60 percent.
This shouldn’t really be surprising.
All the reasons for the GOP’s turn against democracy — backlash to racial progress, rising partisanship, a powerful right-wing media sphere — remain in force after Trump. The leadership is still afraid of Trump and the anti-democratic MAGA movement he commands.
 
Mar 11, 2006
3,910
2,236
1,743
#6
key words 'opinion piece'...one persons opinion...here's an opinion piece as well...

The Republican revolt against democracy, explained in 13 charts

The Trump years revealed a dark truth: The Republican Party is no longer committed to democracy.

The Republican Party is the biggest threat to American democracy today. It is a radical, obstructionist faction that has become hostile to the most basic democratic norm: that the other side should get to wield power when it wins elections.

1) Trump’s supporters have embraced anti-democratic ideas
MAGA Voters - They go further than “merely” believing the 2020 election was stolen, a nearly unanimous view among the bunch. Over 90 percent oppose making it easier for people to vote; roughly 70 percent would support a hypothetical third term for Trump (which would be unconstitutional).

2) Republicans are embracing violence
The ultimate expression of anti-democratic politics is resorting to violence. More than twice as many Republicans as Democrats — nearly two in five Republicans — said in a January poll that force could be justified against their opponents.
The more party leaders like Trump attack the democratic political system as rigged against them, the more Republicans will believe it and conclude that extreme measures are justifiable.

3) Republicans see Democrats as something worse than mere rivals
While many Democrats see Republicans in a dark light, a majority still see them more as political rivals than as enemies. Among Republicans, however, a solid majority see Democrats as their enemy.
When you believe the opposing party to be an enemy, the costs of letting them win become too high, and anti-democratic behavior — rigging the game in your favor, even outright violence — starts to become thinkable.

4) Republicans dislike compromise
America’s founders designed our political system around compromise. But for years now, majorities of Republican voters have opposed compromise on principle, consistently telling pollsters that they prefer politicians who stick to their ideological guns rather than give a little to get things done. It’s no wonder the past decade saw unprecedented Republican obstructionism in Congress

5) The Republican Party is a global outlier — and not in a good way
The GOP is an extreme outlier compared to mainstream conservative parties in other wealthy democracies, like Canada’s CPC or Germany’s CDU. Its closest peers are almost uniformly radical right and anti-democratic parties. This includes Turkey’s AKP (a regime that is one of the world’s leading jailers of journalists), and Poland’s PiS (which has threatened dissenting judges with criminal punishment).
The verdict of these experts is clear: The Republican Party is one of the most anti-democratic political parties in the developed world.

6) The Republican turn against democracy begins with race
The 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act cemented Democrats as the party of racial equality, causing racially resentful Democrats in the South and elsewhere to defect to the Republican Party. This sorting process, which took place over the next few decades, is the key reason America is so polarized.
It also explains why Republicans are increasingly willing to endorse anti-democratic political tactics and ideas. In the past, restrictions on the franchise served to protect white political power in a changing country; today, as demographic change threatens to further undermine the central place of white Americans, many are becoming comfortable with an updated version of the Jim Crow South’s authoritarian tradition.

7) Partisanship causes Republicans to justify anti-democratic behavior
... a “natural experiment” in Montana’s 2017 at-large House campaign, during which Republican candidate Greg Gianforte assaulted reporter Ben Jacobs during an attempted interview just before Election Day.
Because many voters cast their ballots by mail before the assault happened, Graham and Svolik could compare these to the in-person votes after the assault in order to measure how the news of Gianforte’s attack shifted voters’ behavior.
The blue lines represent precincts where Gianforte did worse on Election Day than in mail-in ballots; the red lines represent the reverse. What you see is a clear trend: In Democratic-leaning and centrist precincts, Gianforte suffered a penalty. But in general, the more right-leaning a precinct was, the less likely he was to suffer — and the more likely he was to improve on his mail-in numbers.
For Svolik and Graham, this illustrates a broader point: Extreme partisanship creates the conditions for democratic decline. If you really care about your side wielding power, you’re more willing to overlook misbehavior in their attempts to win it. They find evidence that this could apply to partisans of either major party — but only one party nominates candidates like Trump and Gianforte (who won not only the 2017 contest but also his reelection bid in 2018 and Montana’s gubernatorial election in 2020).

8) The crucial impact of the right-wing media
The chart here is from a study covering 1997 to 2002, when Fox News was still being rolled out across the country. The study compared members of Congress in districts where Fox News was available to members in districts where it wasn’t, specifically examining how frequently they voted along party lines.
They found that Republicans in districts with Fox grew considerably more likely to vote with the party as it got closer to election time, whereas Republicans without Fox actually grew less likely to do so. The expansion of Fox News, in short, seemingly served a disciplining function: making Republican members of Congress more afraid of the consequences of breaking with the party come election time and thus less inclined to engage in bipartisan legislative efforts.

9) Republicans have an unpopular policy agenda
...compares the relative popularity of the two major legislative efforts of Trump’s first term — tax cuts and Obamacare repeal — to similar high-priority bills in years past. The contrast is striking: The GOP’s modern economic agenda is widely disliked even compared to unpopular bills of the past, a finding consistent with a lot of recent polling data.
Hacker and Pierson argue that this drives Republicans’ emphasis on culture war and anti-Democratic identity politics. This strategy, which they term “plutocratic populism,” allows the party’s super-wealthy backers to get their tax cuts while the base gets the partisan street fight they crave.

10) Some of the most consequential Republican attacks on democracy happen at the state level
This map from the Brennan Center for Justice shows every state that passed a restriction on the franchise between 2010 and 2019. These restrictions, ranging from voter ID laws to felon disenfranchisement, were generally passed by Republican majorities with the intent of hurting turnout among Democratic-leaning constituencies.
Because Republicans dominated the 2010 midterm elections, Republican statehouses got to control the post-2010 census redistricting process at both the House and state legislative level, leading to extreme gerrymandering in Republican-controlled states unlike anything in Democratic ones.
Conservative control of the Supreme Court enabled this state-level push. In 2013, the Court struck down the Voting Rights Act’s “preclearance” requirement — that states with a history of racial discrimination would be required to get permission from the Justice Department on their maps and other major changes to electoral law. In 2019, another Court ruling paved the way for further partisan gerrymandering.

11) The national GOP has broken government
Today’s Senate, where you need 60 votes to get virtually anything done, is a historical anomaly. Its roots can be traced to the unyielding GOP opposition to President Barack Obama in 2009 and 2010, when Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell turned the Senate into a dysfunctional body in which priority legislation was routinely subject to a filibuster. When Republicans won a Senate majority in 2014, McConnell found a new way to deny Obama victories: blocking his judicial appointments.
These actions were an expression of an attitude popular among Republican voters and leaders alike: that Democrats can never be legitimate leaders, even if elected, and thus do not deserve to wield power.

12) Republicans didn’t care when Trump abused his power
The Trump presidency was a test of Republican attitudes toward democracy. Time and again, the president abused his authority in ways that would have been unthinkable under previous presidents. Time and again, members of Congress, state party leaders, right-wing media stars, and rank-and-file voters looked the other way — or even cheered him on.
The chart here, which shows two NBC polls taken about a year apart, is particularly striking. It shows that support for Trump’s first and second impeachment among Republicans remained exactly the same among Republicans: 8 percent.

13) Trump and Trumpism could return in 2024
This chart shows the results of a Morning Consult poll on the 2024 Republican primary held after Trump’s second impeachment trial. It found that 54 percent of Republicans would choose Trump again, even when given a wide range of alternative possibilities. Six percent would choose his son Donald Trump Jr. — who obviously wouldn’t run if his father did — putting the Trump family support in the GOP primary electorate at around 60 percent.
This shouldn’t really be surprising.
All the reasons for the GOP’s turn against democracy — backlash to racial progress, rising partisanship, a powerful right-wing media sphere — remain in force after Trump. The leadership is still afraid of Trump and the anti-democratic MAGA movement he commands.
Do you believe more than one sentence of that? If not, why post it? There is no doubt extremists viewpoints out there, but why spend a second amplifying them? This seems like extremely far-left viewpoints that even Ilan Omar might think is radical.
 

PF5

Deputy
Jan 3, 2014
1,116
332
713
#7
Do you believe more than one sentence of that? If not, why post it? There is no doubt extremists viewpoints out there, but why spend a second amplifying them? This seems like extremely far-left viewpoints that even Ilan Omar might think is radical.
just to prove a point about opinion pieces...and I do believe in more than one sentence...5 to be exact...
 
Mar 11, 2006
3,910
2,236
1,743
#8
just to prove a point about opinion pieces...and I do believe in more than one sentence...5 to be exact...
Other than when Trump is mentioned, would you agree that the word “Democrat” could easily replace the word “Republican”? Items #2 through #12, for example.
 

PF5

Deputy
Jan 3, 2014
1,116
332
713
#9
Other than when Trump is mentioned, would you agree that the word “Democrat” could easily replace the word “Republican”? Items #2 through #12, for example.
ummm probably not #12, Democrats cared that trump 'abuse his power'!...I'm not crazy about either party...that's why I'm an Independent...I am anti-trump and #13 frightens me!!
 
Last edited:
May 31, 2007
1,981
465
1,713
OK & CA
#10
The R’s are no better or worse than the D’s. We are a new age banana republic and this two party nonsense is designed to keep people distracted from that fact. Glancing at this sub it is obviously a proven method.
 

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
7,434
3,515
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
#11
The R’s are no better or worse than the D’s. We are a new age banana republic and this two party nonsense is designed to keep people distracted from that fact. Glancing at this sub it is obviously a proven method.
Like where you’re going with this. Obviously.

The only disagreement I have is that this isn’t new. It’s just out in the open now.

Depending on your age, there was always a “distraction”, a other “thing” that kept you (us) from realizing your point.

For me, it was the Russians. For my 25 year old its the environment and race. My youngest, its reproductive rights. Are these distractions or the subjects we’re told are important? Or both? Possibly, it’s the weaponization of information.

Obviously whatever forces we are discussing it’s very apparent that Americans are divided. There’s a big statement, right? But my issue is that Americans WANT to be divided.

Why?

I believe it’s the mental gymnastics used by those whom are suffering from consuming too much hate, anger and jealousy in trying to prove to themselves it’s not really hate.

It’s hateful to want to break a state in half for two parties. Or to find a news source that YOU agree with. Or to burn a building. Or to carry weapons to protests. Or to threaten travel restrictions to another state. Or a corporation to threaten jobs. Its hateful to want to hurt or see hurt in those you oppose. If you find yourself gleeful in the death of a politician or political celebrity like Rush Limbaugh, sorry that’s hate. Btw, never listened to the man and yes, I hated him as a youngin. Now, I’m sad that his death was so public.

It’s not too late. If you have to hate then hate ignorance. Or hate hate. Or poverty. Or pollution. Or those freaking Sooners. Except @Boomer.....
 
Mar 11, 2006
3,910
2,236
1,743
#12
ummm probably not #12, Democrats cared that trump 'abuse his power'!...I'm not crazy about either party...that's why I'm an Independent...I am anti-trump and #13 frightens me!!
I meant by #12 that you could replace Trump with Obama, Clinton, or Biden and get the same. People entrenched in their party do not seem to care if their leaders abuse power…or at the very least stretch it to favor their viewpoints.
 

cowboyinexile

Have some class
A/V Subscriber
Jun 29, 2004
18,921
10,966
1,743
41
Fairmont, MN
#13
key words 'opinion piece'...one persons opinion...here's an opinion piece as well...

The Republican revolt against democracy, explained in 13 charts

The Trump years revealed a dark truth: The Republican Party is no longer committed to democracy.

The Republican Party is the biggest threat to American democracy today. It is a radical, obstructionist faction that has become hostile to the most basic democratic norm: that the other side should get to wield power when it wins elections.

1) Trump’s supporters have embraced anti-democratic ideas
MAGA Voters - They go further than “merely” believing the 2020 election was stolen, a nearly unanimous view among the bunch. Over 90 percent oppose making it easier for people to vote; roughly 70 percent would support a hypothetical third term for Trump (which would be unconstitutional).

2) Republicans are embracing violence
The ultimate expression of anti-democratic politics is resorting to violence. More than twice as many Republicans as Democrats — nearly two in five Republicans — said in a January poll that force could be justified against their opponents.
The more party leaders like Trump attack the democratic political system as rigged against them, the more Republicans will believe it and conclude that extreme measures are justifiable.

3) Republicans see Democrats as something worse than mere rivals
While many Democrats see Republicans in a dark light, a majority still see them more as political rivals than as enemies. Among Republicans, however, a solid majority see Democrats as their enemy.
When you believe the opposing party to be an enemy, the costs of letting them win become too high, and anti-democratic behavior — rigging the game in your favor, even outright violence — starts to become thinkable.

4) Republicans dislike compromise
America’s founders designed our political system around compromise. But for years now, majorities of Republican voters have opposed compromise on principle, consistently telling pollsters that they prefer politicians who stick to their ideological guns rather than give a little to get things done. It’s no wonder the past decade saw unprecedented Republican obstructionism in Congress

5) The Republican Party is a global outlier — and not in a good way
The GOP is an extreme outlier compared to mainstream conservative parties in other wealthy democracies, like Canada’s CPC or Germany’s CDU. Its closest peers are almost uniformly radical right and anti-democratic parties. This includes Turkey’s AKP (a regime that is one of the world’s leading jailers of journalists), and Poland’s PiS (which has threatened dissenting judges with criminal punishment).
The verdict of these experts is clear: The Republican Party is one of the most anti-democratic political parties in the developed world.

6) The Republican turn against democracy begins with race
The 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act cemented Democrats as the party of racial equality, causing racially resentful Democrats in the South and elsewhere to defect to the Republican Party. This sorting process, which took place over the next few decades, is the key reason America is so polarized.
It also explains why Republicans are increasingly willing to endorse anti-democratic political tactics and ideas. In the past, restrictions on the franchise served to protect white political power in a changing country; today, as demographic change threatens to further undermine the central place of white Americans, many are becoming comfortable with an updated version of the Jim Crow South’s authoritarian tradition.

7) Partisanship causes Republicans to justify anti-democratic behavior
... a “natural experiment” in Montana’s 2017 at-large House campaign, during which Republican candidate Greg Gianforte assaulted reporter Ben Jacobs during an attempted interview just before Election Day.
Because many voters cast their ballots by mail before the assault happened, Graham and Svolik could compare these to the in-person votes after the assault in order to measure how the news of Gianforte’s attack shifted voters’ behavior.
The blue lines represent precincts where Gianforte did worse on Election Day than in mail-in ballots; the red lines represent the reverse. What you see is a clear trend: In Democratic-leaning and centrist precincts, Gianforte suffered a penalty. But in general, the more right-leaning a precinct was, the less likely he was to suffer — and the more likely he was to improve on his mail-in numbers.
For Svolik and Graham, this illustrates a broader point: Extreme partisanship creates the conditions for democratic decline. If you really care about your side wielding power, you’re more willing to overlook misbehavior in their attempts to win it. They find evidence that this could apply to partisans of either major party — but only one party nominates candidates like Trump and Gianforte (who won not only the 2017 contest but also his reelection bid in 2018 and Montana’s gubernatorial election in 2020).

8) The crucial impact of the right-wing media
The chart here is from a study covering 1997 to 2002, when Fox News was still being rolled out across the country. The study compared members of Congress in districts where Fox News was available to members in districts where it wasn’t, specifically examining how frequently they voted along party lines.
They found that Republicans in districts with Fox grew considerably more likely to vote with the party as it got closer to election time, whereas Republicans without Fox actually grew less likely to do so. The expansion of Fox News, in short, seemingly served a disciplining function: making Republican members of Congress more afraid of the consequences of breaking with the party come election time and thus less inclined to engage in bipartisan legislative efforts.

9) Republicans have an unpopular policy agenda
...compares the relative popularity of the two major legislative efforts of Trump’s first term — tax cuts and Obamacare repeal — to similar high-priority bills in years past. The contrast is striking: The GOP’s modern economic agenda is widely disliked even compared to unpopular bills of the past, a finding consistent with a lot of recent polling data.
Hacker and Pierson argue that this drives Republicans’ emphasis on culture war and anti-Democratic identity politics. This strategy, which they term “plutocratic populism,” allows the party’s super-wealthy backers to get their tax cuts while the base gets the partisan street fight they crave.

10) Some of the most consequential Republican attacks on democracy happen at the state level
This map from the Brennan Center for Justice shows every state that passed a restriction on the franchise between 2010 and 2019. These restrictions, ranging from voter ID laws to felon disenfranchisement, were generally passed by Republican majorities with the intent of hurting turnout among Democratic-leaning constituencies.
Because Republicans dominated the 2010 midterm elections, Republican statehouses got to control the post-2010 census redistricting process at both the House and state legislative level, leading to extreme gerrymandering in Republican-controlled states unlike anything in Democratic ones.
Conservative control of the Supreme Court enabled this state-level push. In 2013, the Court struck down the Voting Rights Act’s “preclearance” requirement — that states with a history of racial discrimination would be required to get permission from the Justice Department on their maps and other major changes to electoral law. In 2019, another Court ruling paved the way for further partisan gerrymandering.

11) The national GOP has broken government
Today’s Senate, where you need 60 votes to get virtually anything done, is a historical anomaly. Its roots can be traced to the unyielding GOP opposition to President Barack Obama in 2009 and 2010, when Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell turned the Senate into a dysfunctional body in which priority legislation was routinely subject to a filibuster. When Republicans won a Senate majority in 2014, McConnell found a new way to deny Obama victories: blocking his judicial appointments.
These actions were an expression of an attitude popular among Republican voters and leaders alike: that Democrats can never be legitimate leaders, even if elected, and thus do not deserve to wield power.

12) Republicans didn’t care when Trump abused his power
The Trump presidency was a test of Republican attitudes toward democracy. Time and again, the president abused his authority in ways that would have been unthinkable under previous presidents. Time and again, members of Congress, state party leaders, right-wing media stars, and rank-and-file voters looked the other way — or even cheered him on.
The chart here, which shows two NBC polls taken about a year apart, is particularly striking. It shows that support for Trump’s first and second impeachment among Republicans remained exactly the same among Republicans: 8 percent.

13) Trump and Trumpism could return in 2024
This chart shows the results of a Morning Consult poll on the 2024 Republican primary held after Trump’s second impeachment trial. It found that 54 percent of Republicans would choose Trump again, even when given a wide range of alternative possibilities. Six percent would choose his son Donald Trump Jr. — who obviously wouldn’t run if his father did — putting the Trump family support in the GOP primary electorate at around 60 percent.
This shouldn’t really be surprising.
All the reasons for the GOP’s turn against democracy — backlash to racial progress, rising partisanship, a powerful right-wing media sphere — remain in force after Trump. The leadership is still afraid of Trump and the anti-democratic MAGA movement he commands.
You messed up. You gave a thoughtful and long response to him. Prepare for many short partisan responses that involve question marks.

My advice, put him on ignore. He isn't worth your time.
 

andylicious

Territorial Marshal
Nov 16, 2013
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#14
Like where you’re going with this. Obviously.

The only disagreement I have is that this isn’t new. It’s just out in the open now.

Depending on your age, there was always a “distraction”, a other “thing” that kept you (us) from realizing your point.

For me, it was the Russians. For my 25 year old its the environment and race. My youngest, its reproductive rights. Are these distractions or the subjects we’re told are important? Or both? Possibly, it’s the weaponization of information.

Obviously whatever forces we are discussing it’s very apparent that Americans are divided. There’s a big statement, right? But my issue is that Americans WANT to be divided.

Why?

I believe it’s the mental gymnastics used by those whom are suffering from consuming too much hate, anger and jealousy in trying to prove to themselves it’s not really hate.

It’s hateful to want to break a state in half for two parties. Or to find a news source that YOU agree with. Or to burn a building. Or to carry weapons to protests. Or to threaten travel restrictions to another state. Or a corporation to threaten jobs. Its hateful to want to hurt or see hurt in those you oppose. If you find yourself gleeful in the death of a politician or political celebrity like Rush Limbaugh, sorry that’s hate. Btw, never listened to the man and yes, I hated him as a youngin. Now, I’m sad that his death was so public.

It’s not too late. If you have to hate then hate ignorance. Or hate hate. Or poverty. Or pollution. Or those freaking Sooners. Except @Boomer.....
You left out climate change and green energy. We are a people relying on media that's simply unreliable. @ Boomer does seem like the most highly evolved form of gooner.
 

StillwaterTownie

Federal Marshal
Jun 18, 2010
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#15
Friendly reminder, for those that don't have this dude blocked, he was cool with viva la revolution 6 months ago. He's a troll and the best thing you can do is ignore him. I won't respond to his multiple attemptst to engage me on this. He will probably quote me multiple times but he isn't worth it. I'm only saying this as a public service announcement. OP isn't worth your time to interact with regardless of your political affiliation.

His pathetic partisan bantering isn't worth anyone's time. If you don't have him on ignore I suggest you do so as even if you agree with him, there are more enlightened conversations to be had in threads he avoids.
He was on here a lot years ago and then went on a long hiatus before recently coming back. Fewer people these days agree with his far right viewpoints. I'm not fond of either party from being unable to find great candidates for president since 2016. That Democrats couldn't find someone in 2016 to beat a sorry character as Trump was pitiful.
 

cowboyinexile

Have some class
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Jun 29, 2004
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#16
He was on here a lot years ago and then went on a long hiatus before recently coming back. Fewer people these days agree with his far right viewpoints. I'm not fond of either party from being unable to find great candidates for president since 2016. That Democrats couldn't find someone in 2016 to beat a sorry character as Trump was pitiful.
He was good people years ago. But lately he's a joke.
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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#18
Other than when Trump is mentioned, would you agree that the word “Democrat” could easily replace the word “Republican”? Items #2 through #12, for example.
ummm probably not #12, Democrats cared that trump 'abuse his power'!...I'm not crazy about either party...that's why I'm an Independent...I am anti-trump and #13 frightens me!!
But do they seem to care that Biden is potentially abusing his power. For instance don't you believe that it is overreach and potential violation of the first amendment for them to be working in lockstep with Facebook and others to not only censor information they don't like but get people kicked off of not just one social media platform but all of them just for disagreeing?

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

TheMonkey

Territorial Marshal
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Sep 16, 2004
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#19
But do they seem to care that Biden is potentially abusing his power. For instance don't you believe that it is overreach and potential violation of the first amendment for them to be working in lockstep with Facebook and others to not only censor information they don't like but get people kicked off of not just one social media platform but all of them just for disagreeing?

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
Where is that info coming from?