The Biden Administration Thread

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Jostate

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Well that does certainly prove that he is moving the country forward in a positive way. Besides CNN, I assume this was also on ABC World News. :)
But did they correct him or just leave it as a bragging point for how great he's doing?
 
Mar 11, 2006
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She is absolutely certifiable, but proof that even crazy people can say something sane every now and then.

Her first sentence is spot on. Amazing we have a spending bill to increase the IRS government workforce by 87k. A version of a Fair Tax should be implemented - our tax code is way too confusing and burdensome.
And now the new bill is even contradictory to current tax laws with the minimum corporate tax.

(Yes, I know the 87k aren’t all armed)
https://twitter.com/repmtg/status/1557710812185231361?s=21&t=vvOs1OXYVPMc94Tzle8ovw
 
She is absolutely certifiable, but proof that even crazy people can say something sane every now and then.

Her first sentence is spot on. Amazing we have a spending bill to increase the IRS government workforce by 87k. A version of a Fair Tax should be implemented - our tax code is way too confusing and burdensome.
And now the new bill is even contradictory to current tax laws with the minimum corporate tax.

(Yes, I know the 87k aren’t all armed)
https://twitter.com/repmtg/status/1557710812185231361?s=21&t=vvOs1OXYVPMc94Tzle8ovw
You know it will be 87,000 of the most qualified people this country has even seen to interpret thousands of pages of the tax code.

That’s my fear of this whole deal. Where are they going to find 87k people qualified to take the job? My accountant has over 40 years experience with the tax code. If I get audited I have to hire him to defend me and who is better qualified to prove everything is correct? The 40 year guy or the new hire who was hired based on pronouns or something else? I’ll still be out the money to pay my accountant for doing nothing wrong.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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You know it will be 87,000 of the most qualified people this country has even seen to interpret thousands of pages of the tax code.

That’s my fear of this whole deal. Where are they going to find 87k people qualified to take the job? My accountant has over 40 years experience with the tax code. If I get audited I have to hire him to defend me and who is better qualified to prove everything is correct? The 40 year guy or the new hire who was hired based on pronouns or something else? I’ll still be out the money to pay my accountant for doing nothing wrong.
The 87k employee hire is confusing to me. That sounds like a ridiculous high amount because that is about the number of employees they have now. However, I have not seen that number disputed.

Even if it is half of that number, that is a disgusting amount of additional people to hire instead of fixing the bloated tax code. But we have people believing this is a positive change and that making simple changes to the tax code to be more fair, that actually raises revenue, (with control of House, Senate, and President) is somehow too difficult.
 

steross

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The 87k employee hire is confusing to me. That sounds like a ridiculous high amount because that is about the number of employees they have now. However, I have not seen that number disputed.

Even if it is half of that number, that is a disgusting amount of additional people to hire instead of fixing the bloated tax code. But we have people believing this is a positive change and that making simple changes to the tax code to be more fair, that actually raises revenue, (with control of House, Senate, and President) is somehow too difficult.
https://www.facebook.com/Taxgirl

Continuing my conversation about reconciliation, here are some quick facts on the IRS budget.
Yes, there’s more money in the bill for IRS. If you’ve been following my commentary, you’d know that the opposite has been happening for some time. For example, in FY 2020, the IRS budget came in at nearly $2 billion less than it was ten years ago.
As I’ve written before, those reductions have clearly affected staffing. While the IRS had nearly 95,000 FTE positions in the fiscal year 2011, that number dropped to 75,773 for the last FY. And it’s not going up—an estimated 63% of current IRS employees will be eligible to retire or likely to resign in the next six years (the workforce has been aging and has not been replaced).
The extra money is to help IRS pick up 87,000 new workers — not just agents — over the next decade. **This is an important distinction.** New workers include those in several departments, including customer service and IT.
The workforce would not increase more than 15% in any year. That can be contrasted against the current attrition rate of 7.3%.

As the Taxpayer Advocate noted in her most recent report to Congress, “t is not feasible for an agency the size of the IRS to staff up and train new employees quickly. The IRS also is limited in its ability to hire new employees when funding is provided on a one-time basis because there is no assurance it will have sufficient funding in future years to retain those employees.”


Anyone who has had to interact with IRS on a regular basis, especially over the past few years, knows that employee shortages have directly impacted taxpayer services — and not in a good way.

Here’s a concrete example: In FY 2021, the IRS received about 282 million telephone calls. Customer service representatives only answered about 32 million, or 11%, of those calls. That is a resources issue.

Another example: It took until June 2021 before the IRS had processed most 2019 returns. The IRS closed the filing season with 9.8 million individual returns in its Error Resolution System that required manual processing for each return. Overall, 77% of individual taxpayers received refunds in 2021, so processing delays translated directly into refund delays. Again, a resources issue.
I have some more thoughts on IRS hiring and service, but for now, these are some facts.
As always, good conversation and thoughtful questions are appreciated, but insults and trolls are not. Thanks.
 

OSUCowboy787

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Dec 31, 2008
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The 87k employee hire is confusing to me. That sounds like a ridiculous high amount because that is about the number of employees they have now. However, I have not seen that number disputed.

Even if it is half of that number, that is a disgusting amount of additional people to hire instead of fixing the bloated tax code. But we have people believing this is a positive change and that making simple changes to the tax code to be more fair, that actually raises revenue, (with control of House, Senate, and President) is somehow too difficult.
Here's an idea, kill the tax code all together and go to a straight up consumption tax. You pay taxes on what you buy at a high rate but they touch nothing else. The rich would 'pay their fair share' and the poor would pay less because they would buy less. Give vouchers and exempt food items from taxes and there you go. No more loopholes etc
 
Our return is a little more complicated than a lot of individuals. Regular income, schedule F and a small home based business. I’ve often wondered if I took my information to 5 different accountants would they all come up with the same amount of tax owed? Would two out the five get to the same number?
 

Duke Silver

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Our return is a little more complicated than a lot of individuals. Regular income, schedule F and a small home based business. I’ve often wondered if I took my information to 5 different accountants would they all come up with the same amount of tax owed? Would two out the five get to the same number?
Nope
 
Feb 11, 2007
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Our return is a little more complicated than a lot of individuals. Regular income, schedule F and a small home based business. I’ve often wondered if I took my information to 5 different accountants would they all come up with the same amount of tax owed? Would two out the five get to the same number?
This has been done regularity in the past. The same tax return was given to several major accounting firms....as you might guess all came back with widely different tax owed numbers.