Supreme Court deals Biden climate agenda serious blow with EPA decision

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

gogetumpoke

Banned
Banned
Sep 3, 2010
1,206
239
1,693
#21
Does Congress have the expertise to regulate energy and the environment? I doubt it, so let well educated experts the EPA worry about it. Maybe you would prefer every time those experts have an idea to regulate policy that they first have to go to Congress to get it cleared.
Well educated experts like the new Dept. of Energy appointment? Just take a minute and read the article.

https://thenationalpulse.com/2022/0...icial-is-kink-lecturing-beastiality-rolepayer

One of the hardest things about being a handler is that I’ve honestly had people ask, ‘Wait, you have sex with animals?’” Sam says. “They believe it’s abusive, that it’s taking advantage of someone who may not be acting up to a level of human responsibility… The other misperception is that I have some really messed up background, like, did I have some horrible childhood trauma that made me like to have sex with animals.”

Yep, I’m probably going to want anything this guy comes up with to go through Congress.
 

kenny41

Territorial Marshal
Aug 28, 2006
5,748
3,884
1,743
34
OKC/Tulsa
#22
Lots of folks saber rattling against straw men in this thread.

This ruling is a win for limiting executive authority; which is the way it should be. Laws need to be voted on. On the flip side, with this and RvW overturned I’d expect the senate parliamentary procedure of the filibuster is dead before year end. The result will be the legislative branch will actually start voting on things… Might not be ideal depending who you don’t want to have slight majorities in the house and the senate.
 
Feb 11, 2007
4,985
2,128
1,743
Oklahoma City
#24
Does Congress have the expertise to regulate energy and the environment? I doubt it, so let well educated experts the EPA worry about it. Maybe you would prefer every time those experts have an idea to regulate policy that they first have to go to Congress to get it cleared.
I have known friends who joined the EPA because they were rightly concerned about the environment. Once they began working they found much of what they do has little or nothing to do with the environment. They saw completely inexperience people writing the EPA rules. They ended up quitting. One became a physician and the other sells farm and ranches in Oklahoma.
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
17,083
17,429
1,743
Tulsa, OK
#25
I have known friends who joined the EPA because they were rightly concerned about the environment. Once they began working they found much of what they do has little or nothing to do with the environment. They saw completely inexperience people writing the EPA rules. They ended up quitting. One became a physician and the other sells farm and ranches in Oklahoma.
I would imagine many departments and agencies in our government these days is more about cronyism than anything else. I've also heard it said that the most important job of many bureaucrats in DC is to justify their job.
 
Jul 5, 2020
2,161
406
213
59
Broken Arrow
#26
I would imagine many departments and agencies in our government these days is more about cronyism than anything else. I've also heard it said that the most important job of many bureaucrats in DC is to justify their job.
And the most common and simple methods to do that include creating various data “filters” that will no doubtedly result in exceptions that require comment and follow-up, QA worksheets created with the thought of minimizing filter exceptions and “improving processes”. That’s just office/department #1. Then #2 sees what #1 did, so as to not be outdone, they create their own filters and checksheets that expands those from #1, and likely requires additional personnel or workdays. Rinse…repeat. Then soon enough you’ll actually begin to see checklists for checklists.
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
17,083
17,429
1,743
Tulsa, OK
#27
And the most common and simple methods to do that include creating various data “filters” that will no doubtedly result in exceptions that require comment and follow-up, QA worksheets created with the thought of minimizing filter exceptions and “improving processes”. That’s just office/department #1. Then #2 sees what #1 did, so as to not be outdone, they create their own filters and checksheets that expands those from #1, and likely requires additional personnel or workdays. Rinse…repeat. Then soon enough you’ll actually begin to see checklists for checklists.
That's why it's called bureaucracy. If you are able to get something done while bypassing somebody, then that job isn't needed.

So you have to fill out half a dozen forms in triplicate and submit them to three different departments. But before you do that you need to have two studies done by two different agencies and then have those results verified by a third. Those jobs are now justified.