Pentagon to open up about UFO's

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wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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I finally got around to watch this movie the other day. I actually really enjoyed it.
I need to re-watch it as well. I remember it being pretty good.
Watched it originally when it came out and have seen it a couple of times since, with children as they have gotten older. (I have a bunch of kids). Will probably end up seeing it at least once more as the next batch gets old enough.

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Jostate

Identifies as a Cowboys fan
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Jun 24, 2005
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The vastness of space guarantees not one intelligent species will ever leave their solar system. The smart species wouldn't try to leave their solar system, and the dumb ones can't because they don't know how to do it.
Guarantee is a pretty definitive word. My crystal ball isn't as clear. I understand that we are talking about more than advances in technology but rather rewriting the laws of physics as we understand it. Again a few hundred years in human history is a relatively small length of time but look at the seeming impossibilities we take for granted each day if presented to someone a few hundred years ago. Who knows what a few 100 thousand years of advancements could bring.

And we had no chance of detecting signals, but it was worth the shot. Such signals would quickly fade into the background radiation, thus after traveling a few light-years from its source of origin, inverse-square law kicks in, thereby immediately destroying information contained within radio signals. In other words, pure static noise. No images. No audio. Just static.
There are some pretty scholarly people at SETI who would disagree. You speak of a field of study still in it's infancy as if it were past tense.


Side note, to all: Of course, there's always the possibility a cosmic accident occured on earth approximately 4-ish billion years ago, that allowed the abiogenesis of life (beginning), when life was never supposed to exist, so to speak. We could be the only beautiful diamond harboring profoundly spectacular living entities, in an otherwise lifeless universe. As far as we can tell, this is it.
Your point about the vastness of the universe is solid. But as insane as the number of miles between stars, almost equally insane is the number of planets in the universe. The estimates put it at one of those "illion" words that all start to sound alike, but are really quite different. The odds of our little ball being the only one to spawn life would be unreasonably unlikely.

Life on earth just may be dancing on the grandest - and only - stage in the infinite universe. And look at what we're doing to the biosphere of life on earth. We've created the 6th mass extinction life has faced.
We did? You would think it would have made a little more noise or something.

The utter devastation we've caused will guarantee only insects and microbial life forms will live long enough to take Earth's final bow. The ending of the play is only a page turn away. Believe me when I say, that page is only a turn away.
Oh good Lord, here we go again. I'll recycle my McDonalds wrapper and maybe that will buy us a few more years.

I'm old enough to have heard the doom and gloom for decades. Inevitably, like the religious zealot on the corner with the "end is near" sign, the eco doomsdayers will be right sometime. But for now their track record isn't so impressive.
 
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UrbanCowboy1

Some cowboys gots smarts real good like me.
Aug 8, 2006
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Your point about the vastness of the universe is solid. But as insane as the number of miles between stars, almost equally insane is the number of planets in the universe. The estimates put it at one of those "illion" words that all start to sound alike, but are really quite different. The odds of our little ball being the only one to spawn life would be unreasonably unlikely.
I get the size argument, but that counter-intuitively makes it worse for the aliens camp. The universe is far more vast than any of us can realize; yet in every direction we have looked, as far away as we can look - there is nothing to indicate non-natural processes occurring. I've heard the 'we're alone' sides (the side I'm on) position being described as taking a cup of water out of the ocean, it not having fish, and us declaring that 'we're definitely alone', but that's not really the case. We've taken a cup of water from the ocean and said "there's no microbiology happening here that we're aware of. There's no amoebas, no plankton, not even single-celled life and there's no evidence of any biological processes having ever happened in this water". Does that definitely prove there isn't life in the ocean? No. But it's a really horrible start - or a great start if you're worried about aliens.

As for me, I do think the evidence says we're alone - or maybe one of the first, if not THE first intelligent life. Yes, the universe is old (13 billion years); but it's only approximately .01% of the way through it's stellar period. To put it another way: if the universe were a person that was going to live to be 100, it wouldn't even be four days old. It's a baby. Combine this with the fact that population I stars (heavier metal stars) like our sun are very recent and it's entirely plausible we're one of the first. We're the ancient aliens if we ever figure out FTL travel.

There's like 50 other reasons why I think we're alone, but that would take too much time to type out, lol. I would love for the UFO report that's coming this month to prove me wrong.
 
Nov 6, 2010
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I get the size argument, but that counter-intuitively makes it worse for the aliens camp. The universe is far more vast than any of us can realize; yet in every direction we have looked, as far away as we can look - there is nothing to indicate non-natural processes occurring. I've heard the 'we're alone' sides (the side I'm on) position being described as taking a cup of water out of the ocean, it not having fish, and us declaring that 'we're definitely alone', but that's not really the case. We've taken a cup of water from the ocean and said "there's no microbiology happening here that we're aware of. There's no amoebas, no plankton, not even single-celled life and there's no evidence of any biological processes having ever happened in this water". Does that definitely prove there isn't life in the ocean? No. But it's a really horrible start - or a great start if you're worried about aliens.

As for me, I do think the evidence says we're alone - or maybe one of the first, if not THE first intelligent life. Yes, the universe is old (13 billion years); but it's only approximately .01% of the way through it's stellar period. To put it another way: if the universe were a person that was going to live to be 100, it wouldn't even be four days old. It's a baby. Combine this with the fact that population I stars (heavier metal stars) like our sun are very recent and it's entirely plausible we're one of the first. We're the ancient aliens if we ever figure out FTL travel.

There's like 50 other reasons why I think we're alone, but that would take too much time to type out, lol. I would love for the UFO report that's coming this month to prove me wrong.
If you're talking about life in our solar system, your "cup from the ocean" argument has some merit. But we've not even been able to make a cup yet when it comes to anything outside our most immediate planetary neighbors.
 

UrbanCowboy1

Some cowboys gots smarts real good like me.
Aug 8, 2006
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If you're talking about life in our solar system, your "cup from the ocean" argument has some merit. But we've not even been able to make a cup yet when it comes to anything outside our most immediate planetary neighbors.
Not just the solar system. No signals, no Dyson spheres, no stellar oddities. Nothing. Getting the JWST up and running will give us even more insight - our great leap in understanding. Scheduled launch for later this year (fingers crossed it doesn't get delayed again.).

There's also some stats that I referred to that makes me think we're alone.
I'll note two of them:
1) Out of the millions of species that our planet has produced, there is only 1 that achieved sentience.
2) Copernican principle states that our planet, sun, and solar system aren't special. Our sun is normal (as in not too rare, but it's far from the most common type of star) and earth is very normal. But our solar system layout is.. odd. Odd enough that I'm of a mindset that it's probably the big factor in earth being able to harbor complex, intelligent life.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/our-solar-system-is-even-stranger-than-we-thought/