Pentagon to open up about UFO's

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llcoolw

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#61
After seeing one I believe. Nothing man made could do what I saw. Thought it was a helicopter hovering for about 20 minutes just some lights hovering about half mile off. Then the thing took off going up at an angle. Disappeared in about two seconds I have never seen anything move that fast absolutely unreal. Never made a sound. There were hundreds of people that reported seeing a UFO that night so I knew I wasn't crazy.
I believe too. Saw something cover the sky in Okc about 5 years ago. It went from west horizon to East horizon in less than 4 seconds. Crazy part was it did 6-7 zigzags at the same time. It was still light out and the sun was about two hours from setting. Still no clue what it was or even what to speculate.
 

llcoolw

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#62
Yeah - I can buy this. But I doubt we will learn anything substantive from the "pentagon reports" in this article. Hell, in the Osama assault, the US used a stealth helicopter. We saw the remnants of the tail configuration on TV. The public knows it exists. How much info has the pentagon released on it? Zero.
Will the pentagon release info regarding an Alien or Top Secret technological leap aviation system? um no.

harry reid and this huff article is a joke.
Guess who got that helicopter tail?
 
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#64
Note: The post I replied to was a reply to a post I made on page 2


The energy required is unobtainable. But energy requirement is just one aspect of the problem of traversing space in a feasible timeframe. But, the far more problematic issue is shielding requirement.

As we all know, the faster mass moves, the more kinetic energy the mass obtains. Let's say humans figured out how to produce such enormous energy to travel to the nearest star to our own within a lifetime. We're talking some serious speed. So much so that the speed becomes Relativistic speed (Google what relativistic speed is, for a better understanding)

Using equations of Mr. Albert Einstein's discovery of the Theory of Relativity, when traveling Relativistic speed, if even a speck of microscopic dust collided with the spaceship, the kinetic energy of the spaceship would release the energy equivalent of 28 Hiroshima atomic bombs... the spaceship would literally explode with the energy equivalent of 28 Hiroshima atomic bombs.

We're probably the only intelligent species that's capable of building/creating technology in the Milky Way galaxy, because not one signal has been detected. But, that doesn't mean intelligent species do not exist in our galaxy. When it comes to creating technology, physiology is critically important. Example: dolphins and whales are vastly more intelligent than most people think. They have far more complex linguistic than human language, yet will never be able to build technology due to their physiology, as well as their intelligence evolving in a vastly different environment than land dwelling species

Well, instead of continuing this already long post, check out the link below. And be sure to check out the video of an octopus enlisting help from a diver to catch food. Octopi have intelligence equivalent of an 85 iq.. that is average intelligence of humans. We may never find intelligent aliens elsewhere in the universe.. but that doesn't mean we haven't discovered an intelligent species.. we have found them on planet earth. And it's a god damn shame we humans are the reason the oceans will eventually kill most oceanic life.



 
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llcoolw

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Feb 7, 2005
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#66
Note: The post I replied to was a reply to a post I made on page 2


The energy required is unobtainable. But energy requirement is just one aspect of the problem of traversing space in a feasible timeframe. But, the far more problematic issue is shielding requirement.

As we all know, the faster mass moves, the more kinetic energy the mass obtains. Let's say humans figured out how to produce such enormous energy to travel to the nearest star to our own within a lifetime. We're talking some serious speed. So much so that the speed becomes Relativistic speed (Google what relativistic speed is, for a better understanding)

Using equations of Mr. Albert Einstein's discovery of the Theory of Relativity, when traveling Relativistic speed, if even a speck of microscopic dust collided with the spaceship, the kinetic energy of the spaceship would release the energy equivalent of 28 Hiroshima atomic bombs... the spaceship would literally explode with the energy equivalent of 28 Hiroshima atomic bombs.

We're probably the only intelligent species that's capable of building/creating technology in the Milky Way galaxy, because not one signal has been detected. But, that doesn't mean intelligent species do not exist in our galaxy. When it comes to creating technology, physiology is critically important. Example: dolphins and whales are vastly more intelligent than most people think. They have far more complex linguistic than human language, yet will never be able to build technology due to their physiology, as well as their intelligence evolving in a vastly different environment than land dwelling species

Well, instead of continuing this already long post, check out the link below. And be sure to check out the video of an octopus enlisting help from a diver to catch food. Octopi have intelligence equivalent of an 85 iq.. that is average intelligence of humans. We may never find intelligent aliens elsewhere in the universe.. but that doesn't mean we haven't discovered an intelligent species.. we have found them on planet earth. And it's a god damn shame we humans are the reason the oceans will eventually kill most oceanic life.



And when that day comes, we too, will not have only destroyed the oceans but with them, ourselves.
 

Jostate

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#68
We're probably the only intelligent species that's capable of building/creating technology in the Milky Way galaxy, because not one signal has been detected. But, that doesn't mean intelligent species do not exist in our galaxy. When it comes to creating technology, physiology is critically important. [/MEDIA]
* Never mind, I now see I posted the same ramblings a year ago, but I spent too much time saying it again to delete it.



Pretty logical post, but I disagree with this part. It's like little creatures living on a grain of sand in the Sahara desert. If those tiny creatures developed the ability to almost travel to the next grain of sand and look out randomly, with poor vision, at a small random selection of the other grains of sand within a few feet and said, "well we don't see anyone else, so we must be alone".

There are an estimated few hundred billion stars in our galaxy, and we are learning each star likely represents more than one planet. That's a lot of chances for intelligence combined with opposable thumbs to evolve. Our planet has demonstrated, given enough time, random evolutionary chance stumbles across incredibly diverse and creative designs. Given the right conditions, and time. it almost seems inevitable that intelligence and the physical ability to use tools, as a survival mechanism would evolve. I find it hard to believe that it only happened once in a few hundred billion chances.

Now traveling there is a different matter. Because of the insane distance, that's harder to make a logical case for. The more emotional case is simply, human history is consistent with us doing things just three generations prior even the most scholarly people would have thought could never be done. Look at the advancement people have made in the last 200 years. That is less than a millionth of the time in the history of our planet. What could have been accomplished by another civilization with a 500,000 year head start?

All that is just our galaxy. If we want to talk universe the number supports my perspective that there has to be other life developing technology, and your side of the discussion that the distances are far too great to make this anything more than a speculative, hypothetical discussion.
 
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OSU79

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#69
* Never mind, I now see I posted the same ramblings a year ago, but I spent too much time saying it again to delete it.



Pretty logical post, but I disagree with this part. It's like little creatures living on a grain of sand in the Sahara desert. If those tiny creatures developed the ability to almost travel to the next grain of sand and look out randomly, with poor vision, at a small random selection of the other grains of sand within a few feet and said, "well we don't see anyone else, so we must be alone".

There are an estimated few hundred billion stars in our galaxy, and we are learning each star likely represents more than one planet. That's a lot of chances for intelligence combined with opposable thumbs to evolve. Our planet has demonstrated, given enough time, random evolutionary chance stumbles across incredibly diverse and creative designs. Given the right conditions, and time. it almost seems inevitable that intelligence and the physical ability to use tools, as a survival mechanism would evolve. I find it hard to believe that it only happened once in a few hundred billion chances.

Now traveling there is a different matter. Because of the insane distance, that's harder to make a logical case for. The more emotional case is simply, human history is consistent with us doing things just three generations prior even the most scholarly people would have thought could never be done. Look at the advancement people have made in the last 200 years. That is less than a millionth of the time in the history of our planet. What could have been accomplished by another civilization with a 500,000 year head start?
Always be careful with math!

In your example, a 500,000 year head start is one quarter of one percent, or next to nothing.

Happy Pi Day!
 

Jostate

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#70
Always be careful with math!

In your example, a 500,000 year head start is one quarter of one percent, or next to nothing.

Happy Pi Day!
It was probably my semantics that was sloppy more than my math. The planet is about 4.5 billion years old. I was comparing the 200 years of progress to the 435 billion year history of the planet. The 500,000 year head start was random and hypothetical. Either way the point is similar.
 

OSU79

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It was probably my semantics that was sloppy more than my math. The planet is about 4.5 billion years old. I was comparing the 200 years of progress to the 435 billion year history of the planet. The 500,000 year head start was random and hypothetical. Either way the point is similar.
A) I gave you the benefit of the doubt, comparing 500,000 to 200 million (.0025). If you wantto compare 500,000 to 435 billion it's 0.0000011494.

B) I was just effing with you. I understand and agree with your point.

C) I feel compelled to do math on Pi Day. It's part of The Curse of the Engineer.
 

Jostate

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#72
A) I gave you the benefit of the doubt, comparing 500,000 to 200 million (.0025). If you wantto compare 500,000 to 435 billion it's 0.0000011494.

B) I was just effing with you. I understand and agree with your point.

C) I feel compelled to do math on Pi Day. It's part of The Curse of the Engineer.
That's why I went with the "less than". That's lazy, marketing major, math.