Patriot Front - Idaho Incident

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Binman4OSU

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Aug 31, 2007
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#1
An Anon Donor, bailed all of them out of Jail next day.

https://twitter.com/washingtonpost/status/1536686409448398848

https://twitter.com/FoxNews/status/1536552782144077824

https://twitter.com/MikeSington/status/1536679175527862273
 

Binman4OSU

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#7
Man the police just can't win. One year they are targeted by BLM for being racist, the next they are targeted by white supremacists for not being racist enough.
The scary part about me seeing this language and white supremacists starting to blame cops.

1. 65%+ of all Domestic Terrorist incidents are carried out by white supremacists in the US
2. They are VERY violent
3. They will relentlessly pursue, harass and attack a target they see as their enemy

If they get a movement going where enough of these groups start to agree and start to point the finger at cops and directing their filth and hate at the police....that crap might escalate REALLY fast.
 

LS1 Z28

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#8
Why were they arrested?
They were arrested on misdemeanor "conspiracy to riot" charges. I've read that the police recovered documents stating what their plans were, but I haven't heard any details. It will be interesting to see if they actually have enough evidence to prove that they intended to commit a crime.

I'm kind of torn on this deal. These guys were clearly idiots looking to stir things up, but I don't like arresting someone on the suspicion that they might commit a crime.
 

Binman4OSU

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#9
They were arrested on misdemeanor "conspiracy to riot" charges. I've read that the police recovered documents stating what their plans were, but I haven't heard any details. It will be interesting to see if they actually have enough evidence to prove that they intended to commit a crime.

I'm kind of torn on this deal. These guys were clearly idiots looking to stir things up, but I don't like arresting someone on the suspicion that they might commit a crime.
I thought I read somewhere that 3 were ex cons who were charged with firearms charges out of this deal.
 

CowboyJD

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#10
They were arrested on misdemeanor "conspiracy to riot" charges. I've read that the police recovered documents stating what their plans were, but I haven't heard any details. It will be interesting to see if they actually have enough evidence to prove that they intended to commit a crime.

I'm kind of torn on this deal. These guys were clearly idiots looking to stir things up, but I don't like arresting someone on the suspicion that they might commit a crime.
Conspiracy charges require proof of overt acts in furtherance of the conspiracy.

In other words, actual acts towards committing the crime. Mere suspicion that they might commit a crime isn’t what they were arrested for.
 

LS1 Z28

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#12
I thought I read somewhere that 3 were ex cons who were charged with firearms charges out of this deal.
I haven't heard that, but that doesn't mean it isn't true. This is what I read earlier today:

https://www.cnn.com/2022/06/13/us/idaho-patriot-front-arrests-pride-what-we-know/index.html
Hammond referred to those arrested as young men who "seem to not have a purpose." Asked what he thought the group might have done had police not thwarted their alleged plans, he said, "I have not seen that these people had any firearms, so I think it would've been mostly just disruption and trying to cause fear." Police found at least one smoke grenade, White said...

..."It is clear to us, based on the gear that the individuals had with them, the stuff they had in their possession in the U-Haul with them, along with paperwork that was seized from them, that they came to riot downtown," White said.
 

LS1 Z28

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#13
Conspiracy charges require proof of overt acts in furtherance of the conspiracy.

In other words, actual acts towards committing the crime. Mere suspicion that they might commit a crime isn’t what they were arrested for.
That's interesting. The reports are that someone called the police after seeing them load up in a truck in riot gear. They were stopped en route before they ever reached the event, so I'm not sure what criminal acts they would've committed.
 

Binman4OSU

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#14
That's interesting. The reports are that someone called the police after seeing them load up in a truck in riot gear. They were stopped en route before they ever reached the event, so I'm not sure what criminal acts they would've committed.
Says here all were charged with one count of Conspiracy to Riot..which is a misdemeanor and punishable up to 6 months in jail and $1000 fine.

https://www.vice.com/en/article/88q4zg/patriot-front-31-arrested


For years, many members of the white nationalist group Patriot Front have mostly managed to keep their identities under wraps.
But now, the mask is off. Thirty-one members of the notoriously secretive, optics-obsessed group, including their leader, were arrested in Idaho over the weekend. And mugshots and names of all 31 arrestees were released by the Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office.
The group was traveling in the back of a U-Haul on Saturday, apparently headed to downtown Coeur d’Alene where an annual LGBTQ Pride event (and a far-right counter-event) was underway, when they were intercepted by local law enforcement.
Coeur d’Alene police said that a “concerned citizen” called the cops when they noticed a group who resembled “a little like an army” clambering into the back of a U-Haul with shields.
Video footage showed police rolling up the rear door to reveal men packed like sardines into the back of the truck. All the men were in Patriot Front uniform—khakis, navy jackets, sunglasses, caps, gloves, and white balaclavas covering their faces.



Unsurprisingly, all 31 of the men who were arrested are white and male, per the group’s requirements. According to a booking memo, all men were aged between 20 and 40 (Patriot Front typically requires members to be under the age of 35).
They hailed from a dozen different states: seven from Texas, six from Utah, and five from Washington. Just two are from Idaho, but neither is from Coeur d’Alene.



They were booked on misdemeanor charges of conspiracy to riot. Law enforcement recovered shields, shin guards, and a smoke grenade in the rented U-Haul truck.
The arrests set off an online feeding frenzy among antifascist activists trying to glean more information about the men behind the names and mugshots.
An activist group in Spokane, Washington, identified brothers Mishael Buster and Josiah Buster, both arrested in Idaho. They are the sons of Matt Buster, who leads a congregation called the “Real Men’s Ministry” and has ties to former Washington state rep. Matt Shea, who was accused by his colleagues of domestic terrorism.
Activists in Portland, Oregon, identified another arrestee, Jared Boyce, as being formerly affiliated with a slightly more moderate far-right group Patriot Prayer, particularly in connection with the anti-lockdown movement in March 2020.



Patriot Front formed in 2017 as a splinter faction of a neo-Nazi group Vanguard America, which came under heavy scrutiny after members were seen at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville marching alongside James Alex Fields, who later rammed his car into a crowd of protesters and killed one.
Thomas Rousseau, 23, the former leader of Vanguard America’s Texas chapter, created Patriot Front around some of the hard lessons that the far-right had learned from Charlottesville. Rousseau realized that openly embracing neo-Nazi iconography and rhetoric, as Vanguard America had done, was detrimental to the movement’s broader goals of radicalizing more people to white nationalist ideology. Instead, Patriot Front cultivates a preppy Americana aesthetic and relies on euphemism to express old racist tropes and ideas.
Another key lesson from Charlottesville that Rousseau built into Patriot Front was how members should mobilize in public. The majority of white supremacists who marched in Charlottesville did so with their faces uncovered, meaning they were easily identifiable; many of those who attended reported losing their jobs as a result of their participation.
Patriot Front goes to great lengths to conceal their identities. When they appear in public, they do so with their faces completely covered. They typically arrive to events flash-mob style—in a fleet of unmarked cars, U-Hauls or Penske moving trucks—and then leave quickly. Members are required to fulfill a quota for distributing the group’s propaganda—like fliers and posters—which they scatter across their respective “regions,” and are required to take videos or photos of their handiwork, which are then sent to Rousseau as “proof''). Members are also asked to pay out of pocket for those stickers and posters, which Rousseau himself prints.
They have an exhaustive vetting process, and are required to use aliases even when communicating with one another.
Despite all these precautions, they’ve been infiltrated several times by antifascist activists who’ve leaked their communications, hundreds of gigabytes in total that left-wing media outlet Unicorn Riot has organized and published. Activists also have a blog dedicated to doxing Patriot Front members, called “Patriot Fail.” There were just four names that overlapped with the list of members that activists had previously identified.
All arrestees, who have since been bonded out, were expected in court Monday to be arraigned on a single misdemeanor charge for conspiracy to riot. The FBI has said that they are also investigating.
What these arrests mean for the future of Patriot Front are currently unclear. If convicted on conspiracy to riot misdemeanor charges, they could get six months in county jail, a maximum fine of $1,000, or both.

Membership numbers have been kept under wraps in the past, but was estimated earlier this year to be around 220. And on Monday, local activists in Charlottesville, Virginia noticed afresh Patriot Front propaganda sticker in the alleyway dedicated to Heather Heyer, who was killed during a white supremacist attack four years ago.
 

swamppoke

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#15
The scary part about me seeing this language and white supremacists starting to blame cops.

1. 65%+ of all Domestic Terrorist incidents are carried out by white supremacists in the US
2. They are VERY violent
3. They will relentlessly pursue, harass and attack a target they see as their enemy

If they get a movement going where enough of these groups start to agree and start to point the finger at cops and directing their filth and hate at the police....that crap might escalate REALLY fast.
Where does your 65% number come from? I wonder, but it really doesn't matter, because it is all in how things are classified, no?

Me, I would have put all the BLM "mostly peaceful" (but killed/wounded many and caused billions of $$ damage) riots as acts of "Domestic Terror". But of course, they aren't. That alone would have really skewed the numbers. But that was "Social Justice", right?
 

CowboyJD

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#16
That's interesting. The reports are that someone called the police after seeing them load up in a truck in riot gear. They were stopped en route before they ever reached the event, so I'm not sure what crime they would've committed.
Conspiracy to commit a riot.

A conspiracy is an agreement to commit a crime with an overt act towards and/or advancing that agreement to commit a crime.

I haven't read the particular statutes, but using the commonly understood legal meanings, I would conclude that there would have to be some evidence of what they planned to do together (riot, assault and battery) when they got to the Pride Parade and the overt acts towards that crime (that would be arming themselves, getting a Uhaul, putting on their cute costumes and gathering together to go riot) for a conviction.

I'm not saying they have evidence to convict. I don't know that one way or the other. I'm saying charging someone with "conspiracy" isn't charging them based upon crimes they "might have committed". I'm saying it is a crime itself to agree/plan to violate the law AND take overt acts towards completing the plan/agreement to commit a crime.

Conspiracy doesn't punish for crimes they "might commit". It punishes as a crime the agreement to commit a crime and some overt acts towards accomplishing that crime. Basically, conspiracy is planning a crime and taking acts towards committing that crime.

Someone agrees with another to kidnap someone....buys rope, duct tape, guns, etc., but gets caught before kidnapping the person...they've committed the crime of conspiracy to commit kidnapping and aren't being prosecuted because they "might have" committed kidnapping if they hadn't been caught.
 

Binman4OSU

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#17
Where does your 65% number come from? I wonder, but it really doesn't matter, because it is all in how things are classified, no?

Me, I would have put all the BLM "mostly peaceful" (but killed/wounded many and caused billions of $$ damage) riots as acts of "Domestic Terror". But of course, they aren't. That alone would have really skewed the numbers. But that was "Social Justice", right?
it is actually 67%

https://www.csis.org/analysis/war-comes-home-evolution-domestic-terrorism-united-states
1655235805382.png


From 2001 to 2016 it was actually higher

1655237188759.png
 
Last edited:

llcoolw

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#18
Conspiracy to commit a riot.

A conspiracy is an agreement to commit a crime with an overt act towards and/or advancing that agreement to commit a crime.

I haven't read the particular statutes, but using the commonly understood legal meanings, I would conclude that there would have to be some evidence of what they planned to do together (riot, assault and battery) when they got to the Pride Parade and the overt acts towards that crime (that would be arming themselves, getting a Uhaul, putting on their cute costumes and gathering together to go riot) for a conviction.

I'm not saying they have evidence to convict. I don't know that one way or the other. I'm saying charging someone with "conspiracy" isn't charging them based upon crimes they "might have committed". I'm saying it is a crime itself to agree/plan to violate the law AND take overt acts towards completing the plan/agreement to commit a crime.

Conspiracy doesn't punish for crimes they "might commit". It punishes as a crime the agreement to commit a crime and some overt acts towards accomplishing that crime. Basically, conspiracy is planning a crime and taking acts towards committing that crime.

Someone agrees with another to kidnap someone....buys rope, duct tape, guns, etc., but gets caught before kidnapping the person...they've committed the crime of conspiracy to commit kidnapping and aren't being prosecuted because they "might have" committed kidnapping if they hadn't been caught.
Isn’t a conspiracy to commit a misdemeanor a felony? Hope so. It’s fun to say.
 

CowboyJD

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#19
Isn’t a conspiracy to commit a misdemeanor a felony? Hope so. It’s fun to say.
Depends upon statute. In Oklahoma that issue was decided by the Court of Criminal Appeals with Gene Stipe and David Walters shenanigans. It’s a misdemeanor.