Olympics

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Dec 18, 2019
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#1
How many of you are actually watching this time around? I can remember as a kid I had this chart on my wall tracking medals and looking at the paper every morning to get an update. I haven’t watched a minute this year and my kids won’t either. It’s sad what it’s been turned into who can bash the country the they are representing instead of a fun family environment to watch.
I don’t understand if you hate the country you represent that much why even bother?
 
Mar 11, 2006
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#2
I love the Olympics. My family will watch a lot of the action and will this year as well. Watched swimming and skateboarding last night and plan to watch Katie Ledecky’s final tonight.

The US has over 600 athletes in Tokyo. The number of athletes planning on protest flag/country/anthem is an extremely small minority.
 

CowboyJD

The Voice of Reason...occasionally......rarely
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Dec 10, 2004
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#3
I’m watching the hell out of the Olympics.

I especially like the availability of all the sports on streaming. I can watch all of the sports I’m interested in and ignore those I’m rather than being able to watch only what the network decides to feed me.
 
Dec 18, 2019
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#4
I have a friend in his sixties who barely missed making the Olympic team back in his younger years. We talked about this the other day and he stated there is no way anybody back then would have thought about kneeling or disrespecting the country. If they would have there is no way they would have been able to compete. Now those nitwits are heralded as hero’s. It’s crazy how times have changed.
 
May 4, 2011
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#5
I have a friend in his sixties who barely missed making the Olympic team back in his younger years. We talked about this the other day and he stated there is no way anybody back then would have thought about kneeling or disrespecting the country. If they would have there is no way they would have been able to compete. Now those nitwits are heralded as hero’s. It’s crazy how times have changed.
It's definitely more common, but you do know the idea of protesting during the national anthem started at the 1968 Olympics, right?

John_Carlos,_Tommie_Smith,_Peter_Norman_1968cr.jpg
 

CowboyJD

The Voice of Reason...occasionally......rarely
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Dec 10, 2004
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#6
I have a friend in his sixties who barely missed making the Olympic team back in his younger years. We talked about this the other day and he stated there is no way anybody back then would have thought about kneeling or disrespecting the country. If they would have there is no way they would have been able to compete. Now those nitwits are heralded as hero’s. It’s crazy how times have changed.
Your friend doesn’t know his Olympic history. *shoulder shrug*
 

bleedinorange

Federal Marshal
Jan 11, 2010
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Close, very close
#7
It's definitely more common, but you do know the idea of protesting during the national anthem started at the 1968 Olympics, right?

View attachment 91134
Also 1968. I prefer this response as unpopular as it currently is among the ignorant.

1627304709158.png


George Forman: "I thought that, after I win my last fight, when I bow to the judges, I am going to carry our flag. [Everyone] is going to know where I am from. I sincerely didn't think they would. I waved the flag so they knew I was American".
 

steross

he/him
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
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oklahoma city
#8
It's definitely more common, but you do know the idea of protesting during the national anthem started at the 1968 Olympics, right?

View attachment 91134
An interesting story about the other guy on the podium that day in 1968:

https://www.history.com/news/1968-mexico-city-olympics-black-power-protest-backlash

Snippet:
As the American athletes raised their fists, the stadium hushed, then burst into racist sneers and angry insults. Smith and Carlos were rushed from the stadium, suspended by the U.S. team, and kicked out of the Olympic Village for turning their medal ceremony into a political statement. They went home to the United States, only to face serious backlash, including death threats.

However, Carlos and Smith were both gradually re-accepted into the Olympic fold, and went on to careers in professional football before retiring. Norman, meanwhile, was punished severely by the Australian sports establishment. Though he qualified for the Olympic team over and over again, posting the fastest times by far in Australia, he was snubbed by the team in 1972. Rather than allow Norman to compete, the Australians did not send a sprinter at all.
 
Aug 16, 2012
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#9
I have a friend in his sixties who barely missed making the Olympic team back in his younger years. We talked about this the other day and he stated there is no way anybody back then would have thought about kneeling or disrespecting the country. If they would have there is no way they would have been able to compete. Now those nitwits are heralded as hero’s. It’s crazy how times have changed.
My neighbor and poker buddy was in the 64 and 68 Olympics and was a 4-time US Champion and HOF inductee....for pairs figure skating (with his sister). Added the pause-emphasis as he is about 6'-4" and now weighs a good 250 so you would never in a million years guess he was one of the best in the world at figure skating. Anyway, we have had this discussion many times as he is still a consultant for US Figure Skating. His Olympics and disposition were tempered by the Sabena 548 flight that crashed in 1961 killing the entire US figure skating team. The guy has a good perspective on representing his country as well as the sport itself.
 
Oct 30, 2007
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#10
I've followed NBA draft coverage closer than the Olympics this year. I didn't even know they had started until I heard our men's basketball team lost. I just don't have any interest. It appears that I'm not alone, because our country's TV ratings are the lowest in decades.

 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
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#11
I didn't even know we had athletes planning to protest their own country but it's not surprising in this day and age where it is seen as "cool" by so many. I've just lost interest over the years, not because of anything political, just not as interested in the summer Olympics as I used to be...still like the winter Olympics though for some reason.
 

SiggyPoke

Territorial Marshal
Nov 4, 2003
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Tulsa
#12
How many of you are actually watching this time around? I can remember as a kid I had this chart on my wall tracking medals and looking at the paper every morning to get an update. I haven’t watched a minute this year and my kids won’t either. It’s sad what it’s been turned into who can bash the country the they are representing instead of a fun family environment to watch.
I don’t understand if you hate the country you represent that much why even bother?
It must be fun to be you.
 

SiggyPoke

Territorial Marshal
Nov 4, 2003
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#14
Actually I have a pretty good life. Good job great kids new house get to live in Stillwater, USA. So yes things are great. Thanks for the concern.
It sounds like you're almost there. All that's left is to watch some Olympic events with the family while not concerning yourself with the few nuts participating who's views you don't agree with. Trust me, those other Olympic athletes who have worked their asses off to get to the games would really appreciate it.
 

PF5

Deputy
Jan 3, 2014
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#15
How many of you are actually watching this time around? I can remember as a kid I had this chart on my wall tracking medals and looking at the paper every morning to get an update. I haven’t watched a minute this year and my kids won’t either. It’s sad what it’s been turned into who can bash the country the they are representing instead of a fun family environment to watch.
I don’t understand if you hate the country you represent that much why even bother?
it's not about hating the US, it is about making a statement about something you find is wrong IN your country...in most cases it's drawing attention to racial injustice in the US...
 
Mar 11, 2006
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#16
it's not about hating the US, it is about making a statement about something you find is wrong IN your country...in most cases it's drawing attention to racial injustice in the US...
For some, maybe. I think for others it is need for attention and the desire to be perceived as a victim. Gwen Berry is a good example.

I think leagues like the English Premier League have a better solution to allow athletes to show support for issues. Their players briefly kneel before the soccer match, but not during the anthems of countries. This provides athletes, that choose to do so, to show they are thinking of something larger and more impactful than their athletic event, but it is not done in a way that is disrespectful to a country, flag, anthem, or to their competitive opponents.
 
May 4, 2011
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Charleston, SC
#17
For some, maybe. I think for others it is need for attention and the desire to be perceived as a victim. Gwen Berry is a good example.

I think leagues like the English Premier League have a better solution to allow athletes to show support for issues. Their players briefly kneel before the soccer match, but not during the anthems of countries. This provides athletes, that choose to do so, to show they are thinking of something larger and more impactful than their athletic event, but it is not done in a way that is disrespectful to a country, flag, anthem, or to their competitive opponents.
And they still get booed for it like they did at the Euro this summer.
 

PF5

Deputy
Jan 3, 2014
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#19
For some, maybe. I think for others it is need for attention and the desire to be perceived as a victim. Gwen Berry is a good example.

I think leagues like the English Premier League have a better solution to allow athletes to show support for issues. Their players briefly kneel before the soccer match, but not during the anthems of countries. This provides athletes, that choose to do so, to show they are thinking of something larger and more impactful than their athletic event, but it is not done in a way that is disrespectful to a country, flag, anthem, or to their competitive opponents.
you are correct, she did it for attention...to bring attention...and I doubt very much she has a desire to "be perceived as a victim"...but please tell me more how you know so much about her intentions..
 
Mar 11, 2006
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#20
you are correct, she did it for attention...to bring attention...and I doubt very much she has a desire to "be perceived as a victim"...but please tell me more how you know so much about her intentions..
I don’t. Just my guess - hence why I typed, “I think”.

She said she was “pissed” that they played the anthem during the June Olympic trials She also said “it was very disrespectful” for the US Olympic committee to play the national anthem. Think about that … A person is competing for the US during the US Olympic trials and she was “pissed” they played the national anthem and not only that thought it was disrespectful.

In the past she called white people retarded and tweeted she wanted to smack and then stomp a white kid. And has said that “Mexicans don’t care about people”. Tell me how does that bring attention to a cause of racial unity?
 
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