O'Colly fires editor for anti-mask editorial

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snuffy

Calf fries are the original sack lunch.
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Feb 28, 2007
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Oklahoma
#21
Statement from the original op-ed:
I had done my research prior to the class. Senate Bill 658 informed me that a mask could not be required of me within a school setting in the state of Oklahoma. Knowing this, I decided to take a stand.

Statement from the rebuttal:
The full story is not disclosed in this piece, and professors are within their rights and within the law to ask students to wear a mask. Additionally, the way the law is explained in this piece is misleading. What is also not mentioned, is the law does not apply to people such as teachers, principals, individual school officials and professors. Senate Bill 658 does not apply to this situation. Nothing illegal was or is being done by asking students to wear a mask.

Neither of these statements is factual, because our court system hasn't defined whether or not mask mandates can be delegated down to lower levels. Both articles omitted pertinent information to drive a narrative. As much as I hate to say it, this is how journalism works in today's world.
I should have clarified I am not talking about the court or law part, but that why she was asked to leave class.
 

LS1 Z28

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Oct 30, 2007
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#22
I should have clarified I am not talking about the court or law part, but that why she was asked to leave class.
Gotcha. It's hard to imagine someone refusing to wear a mask in classroom with an immunocompromised professor. You have to wonder if she didn't know or if she just didn't care. I hope it's the former, because the latter displays a blatant lack of human decency.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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#23
Gotcha. It's hard to imagine someone refusing to wear a mask in classroom with an immunocompromised professor. You have to wonder if she didn't know or if she just didn't care. I hope it's the former, because the latter displays a blatant lack of human decency.
Some people find odd hills to die on. We continue to have a victimization culture. For years, teachers have had rights to create their own rules for classroom management. Be it no chewing gum, eating, drinking, talking, seating charts, etc.

If she was upset because the professor threw her out of class because she didn’t have a mask and she didn’t have one on her to wear…I probably would agree with her. But she admitted the professor offered her one.
 

TheMonkey

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#24

LS1 Z28

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#25
Some people find odd hills to die on. We continue to have a victimization culture. For years, teachers have had rights to create their own rules for classroom management. Be it no chewing gum, eating, drinking, talking, seating charts, etc.

If she was upset because the professor threw her out of class because she didn’t have a mask and she didn’t have one on her to wear…I probably would agree with her. But she admitted the professor offered her one.
It's really unfortunate that SB658 was passed, because it muddies the waters with situations like this. I think she was an idiot for refusing to wear a mask in a classroom with an at-risk professor, but I don't know if she was within her rights to do so. No one really knows until it's defined by the courts.

It still amazes me that we passed legislation banning mask mandates during a global pandemic. That made us look pretty foolish. I appreciate the freedom that our state provides, but sometimes we lack common sense.
 

wrenhal

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Aug 11, 2011
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#27
What Mr, Travis or the former editor did not say was the whole story. What she printed was so out of line that the entire editorial board published a letter opposing her and sharing the entire story.
She should have been fired.


Correction: Notes from the editors
The O'Colly Editorial Board Sep 11, 2021

The O’Colly editorial staff would like to address the column posted in our Friday paper.

We first would like to state the words in the column are that of an opinion, which is not shared by the whole editorial board.

Although in a column the author or editor may disclose thoughts and opinions on contemporary scenes, it is not something representing the thoughts and opinions of The O’Colly Media Group. As an editorial board, we would like to include some additional information excluded from the column.

Oklahoma State has placed guidelines for professors to decide whether or not to require masks during their in-person instruction. When University Health Services (UHS) reports a positive COVID-19 case in a professor's class, they are allowed to do one of three things.

Move the class online.

Move to hybrid in-person/online instruction, requiring masks for those coming to in-person instruction.

Require masks for their in-person classes.

This column does not state this professor has an immunocompromised system. In an effort to follow OSU’s guidelines after a positive case in their class, the professor required their students to wear a mask in person.

The full story is not disclosed in this piece, and professors are within their rights and within the law to ask students to wear a mask. Additionally, the way the law is explained in this piece is misleading. What is also not mentioned, is the law does not apply to people such as teachers, principals, individual school officials and professors.

Senate Bill 658 does not apply to this situation.

Nothing illegal was or is being done by asking students to wear a mask.

We welcome any and all opinions offering rebuttal of this column, and do not wish to diminish any opinion. As American citizens, we affirm our belief in the First Amendment and the right as journalists to express our personal opinions no matter if our view point is different from those around us.

Anna Pope — News Editor

Dean Ruhl — Sports Editor

Chris Becker — Assistant Sports Editor

Karisa Sheely — Design Editor

Abby Cage — Photo Editor

Ellen Slater — Lifestyle Editor

Ben Hutchens — Digital Editor
I thought in the case of the colleges like OU and OSU, that it wasn't SB658 that applied, but instead it was Stitts executive order against state property having mask mandates. Am I wrong on this?

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Sep 23, 2010
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#28
What's medically wrong with the professor? Should the professor be performing in class if he/she is this compromised? We know the masks have large limitations in regards to their effectiveness. If the professor is in this much danger, he/she should teach through zoom or whatever form the campus uses.
 
Jul 5, 2020
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Broken Arrow
#29
I'm confused on the sides folks are taking on this. So do those who oppose the former editor's stance believe Section 2A3 doesn't apply because it's understood the BOR didn't implement a mask mandate, rather, they just leave it up to each professor? On a separate but related note, do any of you know the status of the temporary injunction to 658 that was issued on 9/1?

SECTION 2. NEW LAW A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 1210.189 of Title 70, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:
A. A board of education of a public school district or a technology center school district, the board of regents of an institution within The Oklahoma State System of Higher Education, the governing board of a private postsecondary educational institution, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, the State Board of Education or the State Board of Career and Technology Education shall not:
ENR. S. B. NO. 658 Page 4
1. Require a vaccination against Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as a condition of admittance to or attendance of the school or institution;
2. Require a vaccine passport as a condition of admittance to or attendance of the school or institution; or
3. Implement a mask mandate for students who have not been vaccinated against COVID-19.
 
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Jostate

Identifies as a Cowboys fan
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#33
Some people find odd hills to die on. We continue to have a victimization culture. For years, teachers have had rights to create their own rules for classroom management. Be it no chewing gum, eating, drinking, talking, seating charts, etc.

If she was upset because the professor threw her out of class because she didn’t have a mask and she didn’t have one on her to wear…I probably would agree with her. But she admitted the professor offered her one.
People have dug their heels in so deep on several of these issues that they make big deals out of little deals.
 

CowboyJD

The Voice of Reason...occasionally......rarely
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#34
Statement from the original op-ed:
I had done my research prior to the class. Senate Bill 658 informed me that a mask could not be required of me within a school setting in the state of Oklahoma. Knowing this, I decided to take a stand.

Statement from the rebuttal:
The full story is not disclosed in this piece, and professors are within their rights and within the law to ask students to wear a mask. Additionally, the way the law is explained in this piece is misleading. What is also not mentioned, is the law does not apply to people such as teachers, principals, individual school officials and professors. Senate Bill 658 does not apply to this situation. Nothing illegal was or is being done by asking students to wear a mask.

Neither of these statements is factual, because our court system hasn't defined whether or not mask mandates can be delegated down to lower levels. Both articles omitted pertinent information to drive a narrative. As much as I hate to say it, this is how journalism works in today's world.
There is presently an injunction against enforcement of SB 658 anyway.

So as of the two persons writing what they did....her’s was dead wrong and their’s was largely correct. If it can’t be enforced, it doesn’t apply to anyone or prohibit anyone from asking students to wear masks.

Presently, public schools can mandate masks in class all they want....until the injunction is overturned.
 
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TheMonkey

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#35
Lol on HIPAA. That's gone out the window on this deal.
Maybe not for the school to know, but I’m pretty sure they couldn’t reveal it to the public without permission.
The science has made it clear that if we're not all wearing N95 masks and wearing them properly, protection is very spotty.
We’ve covered this. I shared clear data on it. This is wrong.
 

LS1 Z28

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#37
There is presently an injunction against enforcement of SB 658 anyway.

So as of the two persons writing what they did....her’s was dead wrong and their’s was largely correct. If it can’t be enforced, it doesn’t apply to anyone or prohibit anyone from asking students to wear masks.

Presently, public schools can mandate masks in class all they want....until the injunction is overturned.
This incident occurred prior to the injunction, and the injunction only allows schools to mandate masks if they offer an opt-out option. So it doesn't really change things all that much.

It will be interesting to see what the courts have to say about this issue. I haven't followed it closely, but I know the gears are turning.
 
Jul 5, 2020
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#38
Definitely looks like it was planned on her part. School commenced on 8/16 and this incident allegedly took place the week of 8/30, so this would have been her third class at a minimum if it’s just a 1-day/week course. So she already knew the policy of the Professor and completed her “research before the class”.
 

llcoolw

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#39
This is very much disputed. The author of SB658 made it very clear that school boards couldn't delegate mask mandate power that is prohibited against them by the law. It appears that OSU has tried to delegate mask mandate power down to the classroom level. Whether or not this is legal can only be determined by the court system.

BTW, I don't care what the law says, refusing to wear a mask in a classroom with an immunocompromised professor makes you a bad person.

I can tell you this, with a cancer survivor in the house, we’ve been handing out free lessons in civility. We have to wear masks regardless. I can’t even put my finger on who these people that walk right up to our faces and say things about sheeple or laugh or make fear jokes. It was so bad we have reveal tshirts that say “ I have cancer, asshole” just for the coup de grâce shot.
 
Nov 23, 2010
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#40
What's medically wrong with the professor? Should the professor be performing in class if he/she is this compromised? We know the masks have large limitations in regards to their effectiveness. If the professor is in this much danger, he/she should teach through zoom or whatever form the campus uses.
Previous post mentioning she had cancer was deleted in case it wasn't public knowledge. I believe it is, I knew it from another Journalism professor mentioning it.

https://twitter.com/Joey_Senat/status/1436437713616609286?s=20