NIL will ruin college football without some massive overhauls

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Cimarron

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Jun 28, 2007
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#21
This^^^
Watch for SMU to probably become a big player again as well with their wealthy alumni.
I'm not sure the SMU payments were excessively huge, it's that they were the only ones doing it (or at least the only one that got caught anyone cared about).
 
Aug 16, 2012
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#24
Simple ways to square up NIL (by the way, there are no NCAA rules about NIL yet, only loose guidelines):

1- money sources can have no ties to a school.
2- no one from a company's management core can be a donor to a school in question
3- no blanket policies
 
Aug 16, 2012
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#25

osupsycho

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#26
I'd like to see those stats.
Not sure what stats you are talking about. I am talking about simple logic that he will be facing defenders that are not going to hit as hard (and likely as often) as he would if he was at FSU. At FSU he would be facing a lot of NFL ready defenders (Notre Dame, Clemson, Miami, Florida, etc etc), where at the HBCU it is a lot closer to high school level of punishment.
 

Cimarron

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#27
Not sure what stats you are talking about. I am talking about simple logic that he will be facing defenders that are not going to hit as hard (and likely as often) as he would if he was at FSU. At FSU he would be facing a lot of NFL ready defenders (Notre Dame, Clemson, Miami, Florida, etc etc), where at the HBCU it is a lot closer to high school level of punishment.
I would like to see the stats that injury is any different at various levels of the NCAA. It's not simple logic because you say it is.

I hear those sorts of "simple logic" in my work all the time but often it's not so simple or even logical.
 

osupsycho

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#28
I would like to see the stats that injury is any different at various levels of the NCAA. It's not simple logic because you say it is.

I hear those sorts of "simple logic" in my work all the time but often it's not so simple or even logical.
When players are bigger, faster and more athletic you stand a higher chance of getting injured just because the hits are going to be more often and with more force. I am just saying overall the athletes at the top of FBS football are going to be much more physical than the athletes at FCS football.
 

PF5

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#29
need to put a cap on NIL...per school?...per athlete?...per sport?...not sure of the answer(s) but this NIL $*&! is out of control, but then again, our whole world is out of control....
 

Cimarron

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#33
When players are bigger, faster and more athletic you stand a higher chance of getting injured just because the hits are going to be more often and with more force. I am just saying overall the athletes at the top of FBS football are going to be much more physical than the athletes at FCS football.
Are the lower division games shorter with fewer plays?

There is some actual research to this question.

There was no evidence of a significant difference in the number of injuries between Division I and Division II or Division II and Division III

https://digitalcommons.liu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1053&context=post_honors_theses
 

Cimarron

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#34
NCAA adopts interim name, image and likeness policy
Interim policy goes into effect Thursday

June 30, 2021 | Michelle Brutlag Hosick

NCAA college athletes will have the opportunity to benefit from their name, image and likeness beginning Thursday. Governance bodies in all three divisions today adopted a uniform interim policy suspending NCAA name, image and likeness rules for all incoming and current student-athletes in all sports.

"This is an important day for college athletes since they all are now able to take advantage of name, image and likeness opportunities," NCAA President Mark Emmert said. "With the variety of state laws adopted across the country, we will continue to work with Congress to develop a solution that will provide clarity on a national level. The current environment — both legal and legislative — prevents us from providing a more permanent solution and the level of detail student-athletes deserve."

The policy provides the following guidance to college athletes, recruits, their families and member schools:
  • Individuals can engage in NIL activities that are consistent with the law of the state where the school is located. Colleges and universities may be a resource for state law questions.
  • College athletes who attend a school in a state without an NIL law can engage in this type of activity without violating NCAA rules related to name, image and likeness.
  • Individuals can use a professional services provider for NIL activities.
  • Student-athletes should report NIL activities consistent with state law or school and conference requirements to their school.
"Today, NCAA members voted to allow college athletes to benefit from name, image and likeness opportunities, no matter where their school is located," said Division I Board of Directors chair Denise Trauth, president at Texas State. "With this interim solution in place, we will continue to work with Congress to adopt federal legislation to support student-athletes."

While opening name, image and likeness opportunities to student-athletes, the policy in all three divisions preserves the commitment to avoid pay-for-play and improper inducements tied to choosing to attend a particular school. Those rules remain in effect.

"The new policy preserves the fact college sports are not pay-for-play," said Division II Presidents Council chair Sandra Jordan, chancellor at the University of South Carolina Aiken. "It also reinforces key principles of fairness and integrity across the NCAA and maintains rules prohibiting improper recruiting inducements. It's important any new rules maintain these principles."

Division III Presidents Council chair Fayneese Miller, president at Hamline, said the Association will continue to work with Congress to develop a national law that will help colleges and universities, student-athletes and their families better navigate the name, image and likeness landscape.

"The new interim policy provides college athletes and their families some sense of clarity around name, image and likeness, but we are committed to doing more," Miller said. "We need to continue working with Congress for a more permanent solution."

The temporary policy will remain in place until federal legislation or new NCAA rules are adopted. With the NIL interim policy, schools and conferences may choose to adopt their own additional policies. Click here to access educational materials.

https://www.ncaa.org/about/resource...adopts-interim-name-image-and-likeness-policy


The new policy preserves the fact college sports are not pay-for-play. It also reinforces key principles of fairness and integrity across the NCAA and maintains rules prohibiting improper recruiting inducements.

Well, so much for that!
 

osupsycho

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#35

Cimarron

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#36
Great now do one on the severity of the injuries, not just the number...
Like I said before, I'm not saying you're right or wrong. But research exits that allows us to speak from a position of knowledge rather than assumptions. Also, I provided you the link, I'll let you read and find an answer to your question.
 

steross

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#39
Great now do one on the severity of the injuries, not just the number...
I agree with him, such a supposition needs data. Bigger faster stronger is true. But also more interested, skilled, and trained. Without data, it is hard to know what factors have the largest impact.

Similar to the data on head injuries between NFL and rugby. Years of hearing how crazy rugby players are not to wear helmets but the data showed more head injury in the helmets.
 
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Feb 11, 2007
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#40
I agree with him, such a supposition needs data. Bigger faster stronger is true. But also more interested, skilled, and trained. Without data, it is hard to know what factors have the largest impact.

Similar to the data on head injuries between NFL and rugby. Years of hearing how crazy rugby players are not to wear helmets but the data showed more head injury in the helmets.
The way college and professional football is played it seems to me that head injury is impossible to prevent.