Kerr-Drummond being demolished

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Nov 8, 2008
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Oklahoma City
#61
I've been told among the considerations is a new federal regulation requiring larger elevators for buildings of that height. So K-D is probably out of compliance with a variety of federal mandates, meaning it is less expensive to replace than modify. Sad.
Nope, if this were true, we'd have been "grand fathered" in. They don't just around retroactively forcing new rules on buildings. Elevator regulations actually change every few years. This has nothing to do with Big Government... in fact, I think they've wanted to demolish KD for the last decade or so.
 
Apr 14, 2011
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#62
Part of my animosity of K-D comes from living in Lawton and starting my career at Cameron amidst the Shepler buildings which are twins of KD, at least the exterior. I thought when I left Lawton I was living those buildings behind, but in reality, I was just moving to see the originals.
What?? I just looked at the Shepler Buildings online. I had no idea there were replicas of KD around. That architectural style is so ugly, I thought there could surely only be one set. Even the nasty looking Mezzanine looks the same. ha!

On a side note, did you know that there is a mini Gallagher Iba that backs up against the Langston University football field? As well, there is a replica of Old Central on our sister campus in Japan. There is a picture of it in the Wes Watkins Center at the North-West entrance.
 

H2Orange

Sitting on the Group W bench
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Nov 17, 2007
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#63
That's correct on where the new residences will be built - today's O'Colly mentioned that. Shutt said they don't have a plan figured out yet for what to use the existing KD lot for.
Shutt............when he opens his mouth, I can't help but think of this guy.......................



Their batting averages are about the same.
 

brianwr

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Aug 2, 2006
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#64
Part of my animosity of K-D comes from living in Lawton and starting my career at Cameron amidst the Shepler buildings which are twins of KD, at least the exterior. I thought when I left Lawton I was living those buildings behind, but in reality, I was just moving to see the originals.
What?? I just looked at the Shepler Buildings online. I had no idea there were replicas of KD around. That architectural style is so ugly, I thought there could surely only be one set. Even the nasty looking Mezzanine looks the same. ha!
Wow, I just looked at the pictures of those Shepler buildings, and if I hadn't seen them tear down the Willham buildings with my own eyes, I would swear they just picked them up and moved them.
 

Celldweller7

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#65
Wow, I just looked at the pictures of those Shepler buildings, and if I hadn't seen them tear down the Willham buildings with my own eyes, I would swear they just picked them up and moved them.
Cameron is a sad place within the abyss known as Lawton, OK. I lived there for around 15 years. By rule, military towns are usually pretty bad, Lawton just extends the cesspool further than most, creating an atmosphere of complete soullessness.
 

L-Town Poke

can you quack like a duck
Aug 11, 2011
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#66
Cameron is a sad place within the abyss known as Lawton, OK. I lived there for around 15 years. By rule, military towns are usually pretty bad, Lawton just extends the cesspool further than most, creating an atmosphere of complete soullessness.
WOW - I was born down here and am still here 29 years later. Maybe it is because I grew up out east of town in the country, but I don't feel that way at all. I know it has it's bad parts of town but complete soullessness is a reach. BTW Cameron has done alot of building new and tearing down old in the last 10 years and is turning into a decent looking campus (the twins aside). As for Lawton being a cesspool, I guess we will just agree to disagree
 

Celldweller7

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#67
WOW - I was born down here and am still here 29 years later. Maybe it is because I grew up out east of town in the country, but I don't feel that way at all. I know it has it's bad parts of town but complete soullessness is a reach. BTW Cameron has done alot of building new and tearing down old in the last 10 years and is turning into a decent looking campus (the twins aside). As for Lawton being a cesspool, I guess we will just agree to disagree
Yeah, we'll have to agree to disagree. I have a very low view of Lawton (by bad areas, do you mean everything not on the far east & west ends?) I have never met an ex-Lawtonite that had a different opinion than mine. I do know one lifetime Lawton guy that loves the place, but he doesn't get out much.

I have some sentiment for Cameron, as I got my start there, and due to my educational background, I needed that. At the same time, I have issues with universities like Cameron, that really have no admittance standards and they don't get much higher once in the classroom. I think the concept of "college education for everyone!" is well-intentioned, but I don't know that it is necessarily good or useful. Especially not with the rising cost of a college education, as that philosophy decreases the value of said education by making it common. That said, I don't have a solution on how to fix that, at least not one that I can actually support.
 

L-Town Poke

can you quack like a duck
Aug 11, 2011
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#68
Yeah, we'll have to agree to disagree. I have a very low view of Lawton (by bad areas, do you mean everything not on the far east & west ends?) I have never met an ex-Lawtonite that had a different opinion than mine. I do know one lifetime Lawton guy that loves the place, but he doesn't get out much.

I have some sentiment for Cameron, as I got my start there, and due to my educational background, I needed that. At the same time, I have issues with universities like Cameron, that really have no admittance standards and they don't get much higher once in the classroom. I think the concept of "college education for everyone!" is well-intentioned, but I don't know that it is necessarily good or useful. Especially not with the rising cost of a college education, as that philosophy decreases the value of said education by making it common. That said, I don't have a solution on how to fix that, at least not one that I can actually support.
While they may have (no) admittance policy I really do not believe that hurts the education overall as most of the kids that would have flunked out of osu will not finish Cameron either plus the fact that there are alot more militayr and adults in class than 18 year olds. So why does it hurt (the university) that they pay for a semester or two before they drop out, just $ in their pocket. Do not get me wrong - I do not think college is for everyone but they should get a shot. I regret how I acted in highschool and wished I would have done things waayyy differently but as they say I was "young, dumb and full of cu*).
 

Celldweller7

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#69
While they may have (no) admittance policy I really do not believe that hurts the education overall as most of the kids that would have flunked out of osu will not finish Cameron either plus the fact that there are alot more militayr and adults in class than 18 year olds. So why does it hurt (the university) that they pay for a semester or two before they drop out, just $ in their pocket. Do not get me wrong - I do not think college is for everyone but they should get a shot. I regret how I acted in highschool and wished I would have done things waayyy differently but as they say I was "young, dumb and full of cu*).
I have a GED and no high school background whatsoever, I came from a poor academic foundation. I was thankful for the adult education programs offered at the local Vo-Tech in Lawton and for the ability to get into Cameron without an ACT/SAT score.

The question isn't those who flunk out, it is those who finish. I'm not concerned with who doesn't get a degree, but who is getting one. Was that person held to a reasonable standard to get a college degree? It sounds elitist, but it is practical. I believe in equality but not defined as "everyone ought to get a shot, no matter what." That's not creating equality, it is happy Marxism, without the economic baggage. It is social leveling for the sake of making everything common and ordinary.

I think the lower tier regional universities tend to give out degrees too easily and it waters down the market. The undergraduate degree is quickly becoming no more useful than a high school diploma and in some circumstances, less useful (it over-qualifies the job candidate). At the same time, it requires more money and in many cases, debt, to attain it. There are too many universities or at least, the standards are too low, because studies show we are not getting more intelligent as a society, despite the increase in college graduates. People are graduating college without being held to a standard, as long as they show up and turn stuff in, they are passed, just as they are throughout primary & secondary school. Education is not actually the focus.

Sadly, I think OSU is inching down this path, as the university is beginning to shape its policy not on being an academic institution, but a business. The businessmen in charge want an enrollment number and current entrance standards are in the way of that enrollment number and therefore, that barrier will be lowered. When the retention rates drop even lower than they are currently due to the lowered admittance policy, the standard in the classroom will be lowered as well.

The problem is, how does one ascertain what the minium standards of a college education should be? I cannot answer that question with a position I can actually support. Therefore, I am of no use in this discussion.
 
May 18, 2011
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#73
The college experience is changing. Kids don't want traditional style housing so the old buildings are being bulldozed in favor of suite-style housing. I work in academic affairs at a university in Texas and I've lived in both styles of housing as a student. I can tell you this: Kids in the future won't make as many good friends as those of us who lived in old-style housing. THe forced-intimate nature of the buildings goes a long way to busting down barriers and allowing people to really get to know one another. Today, in the suite style housing, kids can just go in their rooms and shut the door and never even converse with their roommates.
 
Nov 22, 2006
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Oklahoma City
#74
$4 Million for a new parking garage at OKC-OSU. When will Oklahoma come kicking and screaming into the 21st Century and begin building public transportation so this kind of wastefulness will cease? Oh...wait - I forgot. Oklahoma is all about the oil business. Never mind.

I have been saying the same thing. Thanks for speaking up in light of the circumstances.
 
Nov 22, 2006
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#75
I have a GED and no high school background whatsoever, I came from a poor academic foundation. I was thankful for the adult education programs offered at the local Vo-Tech in Lawton and for the ability to get into Cameron without an ACT/SAT score.

The question isn't those who flunk out, it is those who finish. I'm not concerned with who doesn't get a degree, but who is getting one. Was that person held to a reasonable standard to get a college degree? It sounds elitist, but it is practical. I believe in equality but not defined as "everyone ought to get a shot, no matter what." That's not creating equality, it is happy Marxism, without the economic baggage. It is social leveling for the sake of making everything common and ordinary.

I think the lower tier regional universities tend to give out degrees too easily and it waters down the market. The undergraduate degree is quickly becoming no more useful than a high school diploma and in some circumstances, less useful (it over-qualifies the job candidate). At the same time, it requires more money and in many cases, debt, to attain it. There are too many universities or at least, the standards are too low, because studies show we are not getting more intelligent as a society, despite the increase in college graduates. People are graduating college without being held to a standard, as long as they show up and turn stuff in, they are passed, just as they are throughout primary & secondary school. Education is not actually the focus.

Sadly, I think OSU is inching down this path, as the university is beginning to shape its policy not on being an academic institution, but a business. The businessmen in charge want an enrollment number and current entrance standards are in the way of that enrollment number and therefore, that barrier will be lowered. When the retention rates drop even lower than they are currently due to the lowered admittance policy, the standard in the classroom will be lowered as well.

The problem is, how does one ascertain what the minium standards of a college education should be? I cannot answer that question with a position I can actually support. Therefore, I am of no use in this discussion.

Eloquent, well put and humble; I like it.
 

Poke4Real

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Sep 12, 2006
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#76
The college experience is changing. Kids don't want traditional style housing so the old buildings are being bulldozed in favor of suite-style housing. I work in academic affairs at a university in Texas and I've lived in both styles of housing as a student. I can tell you this: Kids in the future won't make as many good friends as those of us who lived in old-style housing. THe forced-intimate nature of the buildings goes a long way to busting down barriers and allowing people to really get to know one another. Today, in the suite style housing, kids can just go in their rooms and shut the door and never even converse with their roommates.
I agree. I lived on Kerr 2 from Fall 2005 to Spring 2006 and on Parker 2 from Fall of 2008 to Spring of 2009. I met more people in "traditional housing" than I ever did anywhere else during my time at OSU (classes notwithstanding).

Kerr 2 was a wild time. I can see why they're demolishing them. I still miss the All-Nighter Grill.

Also, God help you if you leaned against the inside of the elevators.
 

Philranger

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Oct 6, 2010
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#78
Speaking of Wilhelm, a relative of mine lived there all four years of college and managed to retrieve about 30-40 bricks from the site after the demolition was complete. I know they kept one and distributed a number of them to old friends that lived there. I don't know what became of the rest of them but I assume they're in said person's garage still...
 
Aug 24, 2010
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Indy
#79
The college experience is changing. Kids don't want traditional style housing so the old buildings are being bulldozed in favor of suite-style housing. I work in academic affairs at a university in Texas and I've lived in both styles of housing as a student. I can tell you this: Kids in the future won't make as many good friends as those of us who lived in old-style housing. THe forced-intimate nature of the buildings goes a long way to busting down barriers and allowing people to really get to know one another. Today, in the suite style housing, kids can just go in their rooms and shut the door and never even converse with their roommates.
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May 29, 2007
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NE OK
#80
The college experience is changing. Kids don't want traditional style housing so the old buildings are being bulldozed in favor of suite-style housing. I work in academic affairs at a university in Texas and I've lived in both styles of housing as a student. I can tell you this: Kids in the future won't make as many good friends as those of us who lived in old-style housing. THe forced-intimate nature of the buildings goes a long way to busting down barriers and allowing people to really get to know one another. Today, in the suite style housing, kids can just go in their rooms and shut the door and never even converse with their roommates.
That probably would have helped my GPA.