Jan. 6 sentencing...

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Oct 7, 2008
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Reps can't grant pardons can they? And even if Gossar said the pardons would come from the president, he was going to be out of office in about 3 weeks, not much time to be investigated, charged, then pardoned.

If this is true, it's just a new level of stupidity by any alleged conspirators to actually believe such a promise.
Yeah, the pardons would have come from Trump. And the goal was for Trump to not leave office at all. Rolling Stone is reporting there are three known rioters cooperating with the Jan 6 committee, so we'll find out how much truth there is to this eventually.
 

snuffy

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A Jan. 6 rioter who bragged that she wouldn't go to prison is sentenced to two months

November 4, 20212:19 PM ET
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Violent insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump stand outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6.
Jose Luis Magana/AP
A real estate agent from suburban Dallas who flaunted her participation in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol on social media and later bragged she wasn't going to jail because she is white, has blond hair and a good job was sentenced on Thursday to two months behind bars.

While some rioters sentenced for the same misdemeanor conviction have received only probation or home confinement, prosecutors sought incarceration for Jennifer Leigh Ryan of Frisco, Texas, saying she has shown a lack of candor and remorse for her actions when the pro-Trump mob attacked the Capitol building and delayed Congress' certification of Joe Biden's Electoral College victory.

They also said Ryan's belief that she's shielded from punishment shows she doesn't grasp the seriousness of her crime.

Ryan wasn't facing a felony for more serious conduct, but U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper said she was still among the mob who overnumbered police in an attack that led to the deaths of five people and will have a lasting effect on government institutions.
The Capitol siege: The cases behind the biggest criminal investigation in U.S. history
INVESTIGATIONS
The Capitol siege: The cases behind the biggest criminal investigation in U.S. history
Though Ryan said she was sorry for her actions, Cooper questioned whether she is remorseful and has respect for the law.

"Your actions since Jan. 6 make me doubt some of those things," the judge said.

Prosecutors said Ryan traveled to Washington on a jet chartered by a Facebook friend, described Trump's rally before the riot as a prelude to war, livestreamed her entry into the building as alarms sounded, participated in chants of "Fight For Trump," tweeted a photo of herself next to broken windows outside the Capitol and later said she deserved a medal for what she did.

Her lawyer responded that she was in the building for only two minutes, didn't act violently and has a First Amendment right to speak up on social media.

The judge then referred to Ryan's March 26 tweet in which she wrote, "Definitely not going to jail. Sorry I have blonde hair white skin a great job a great future and I'm not going to jail. Sorry to rain on your hater parade. I did nothing wrong."

In a letter to the judge, Ryan denied believing she was immune to punishment, saying she was responding to people who made fun of her appearance and called for her to be imprisoned. She said her attorney told her at the time that prosecutors would be recommending a sentence of probation.
"I was attacked and I was answering them," Ryan said in court.

She is the 10th person charged in the Jan. 6 attack to get a jail or prison sentence. More than 650 people have been charged for their actions at the Capitol.

Prosecutors said Ryan has since downplayed the violence at the Capitol and falsely claimed to probation authorities that she didn't know there was a riot until she came to the Capitol, even though she had recorded herself in a hotel room watching news coverage of rioters climbing the walls of the Capitol.

After the riot, Ryan said she faced a backlash that included death threats, public heckling and graffiti painted on her real estate signs. She said she had to change her name and disguise herself in public.

Ryan tweeted a photo of herself next to broken windows and holding her fingers in a V sign, with a caption saying, "Window at The capital. And if the news doesn't stop lying about us we're going to come after their studios next..."

Shortly afterward, Ryan posted another tweet about a crowd damaging equipment belonging to news organizations, including The Associated Press. She tweeted it was a "cool moment" when rioters "went to town on the AP equipment."

Ryan is expected to start serving her sentence in January.

Also on Thursday, a Maryland woman who joined the mob's attack was sentenced to three years of probation, including two months of home detention.

Brittiany Angelina Dillon said her actions at the Capitol were "inexcusable and unacceptable." She referred to Jan. 6 as the worst day of her life.

"I never want to step foot in Washington, D.C., again, and I love that city," she said. "Ï don't want to think about that day. It's horrible."

Judge Dabney Friedrich said text messages show Dillon clearly anticipated violence when she went to Washington on Jan. 6 and seemed intent on doing her part to stop Congress from certifying Biden's victory.

The judge said she was troubled by statements that Dillon made before and after the riot, including her reference to law enforcement officers as "devils."

"The attack she participated in was an attack on our institutions of government, the rule of law and our democratic process," Friedrich said.

According to prosecutors, Dillon pushed through a crowd of rioters to approach an entrance to the Capitol but was pushed back before she could make it beyond the building's threshold.

She wasn't accused of engaging in any violence or property damage. Dillon pleaded guilty in July to misdemeanor disorderly conduct in a Capitol building.
 

TheMonkey

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A Jan. 6 rioter who bragged that she wouldn't go to prison is sentenced to two months

November 4, 20212:19 PM ET
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Violent insurrectionists loyal to President Donald Trump stand outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6.
Jose Luis Magana/AP
A real estate agent from suburban Dallas who flaunted her participation in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol on social media and later bragged she wasn't going to jail because she is white, has blond hair and a good job was sentenced on Thursday to two months behind bars.

While some rioters sentenced for the same misdemeanor conviction have received only probation or home confinement, prosecutors sought incarceration for Jennifer Leigh Ryan of Frisco, Texas, saying she has shown a lack of candor and remorse for her actions when the pro-Trump mob attacked the Capitol building and delayed Congress' certification of Joe Biden's Electoral College victory.

They also said Ryan's belief that she's shielded from punishment shows she doesn't grasp the seriousness of her crime.

Ryan wasn't facing a felony for more serious conduct, but U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper said she was still among the mob who overnumbered police in an attack that led to the deaths of five people and will have a lasting effect on government institutions.
The Capitol siege: The cases behind the biggest criminal investigation in U.S. history
INVESTIGATIONS
The Capitol siege: The cases behind the biggest criminal investigation in U.S. history
Though Ryan said she was sorry for her actions, Cooper questioned whether she is remorseful and has respect for the law.

"Your actions since Jan. 6 make me doubt some of those things," the judge said.

Prosecutors said Ryan traveled to Washington on a jet chartered by a Facebook friend, described Trump's rally before the riot as a prelude to war, livestreamed her entry into the building as alarms sounded, participated in chants of "Fight For Trump," tweeted a photo of herself next to broken windows outside the Capitol and later said she deserved a medal for what she did.

Her lawyer responded that she was in the building for only two minutes, didn't act violently and has a First Amendment right to speak up on social media.

The judge then referred to Ryan's March 26 tweet in which she wrote, "Definitely not going to jail. Sorry I have blonde hair white skin a great job a great future and I'm not going to jail. Sorry to rain on your hater parade. I did nothing wrong."

In a letter to the judge, Ryan denied believing she was immune to punishment, saying she was responding to people who made fun of her appearance and called for her to be imprisoned. She said her attorney told her at the time that prosecutors would be recommending a sentence of probation.
"I was attacked and I was answering them," Ryan said in court.

She is the 10th person charged in the Jan. 6 attack to get a jail or prison sentence. More than 650 people have been charged for their actions at the Capitol.

Prosecutors said Ryan has since downplayed the violence at the Capitol and falsely claimed to probation authorities that she didn't know there was a riot until she came to the Capitol, even though she had recorded herself in a hotel room watching news coverage of rioters climbing the walls of the Capitol.

After the riot, Ryan said she faced a backlash that included death threats, public heckling and graffiti painted on her real estate signs. She said she had to change her name and disguise herself in public.

Ryan tweeted a photo of herself next to broken windows and holding her fingers in a V sign, with a caption saying, "Window at The capital. And if the news doesn't stop lying about us we're going to come after their studios next..."

Shortly afterward, Ryan posted another tweet about a crowd damaging equipment belonging to news organizations, including The Associated Press. She tweeted it was a "cool moment" when rioters "went to town on the AP equipment."

Ryan is expected to start serving her sentence in January.

Also on Thursday, a Maryland woman who joined the mob's attack was sentenced to three years of probation, including two months of home detention.

Brittiany Angelina Dillon said her actions at the Capitol were "inexcusable and unacceptable." She referred to Jan. 6 as the worst day of her life.

"I never want to step foot in Washington, D.C., again, and I love that city," she said. "Ï don't want to think about that day. It's horrible."

Judge Dabney Friedrich said text messages show Dillon clearly anticipated violence when she went to Washington on Jan. 6 and seemed intent on doing her part to stop Congress from certifying Biden's victory.

The judge said she was troubled by statements that Dillon made before and after the riot, including her reference to law enforcement officers as "devils."

"The attack she participated in was an attack on our institutions of government, the rule of law and our democratic process," Friedrich said.

According to prosecutors, Dillon pushed through a crowd of rioters to approach an entrance to the Capitol but was pushed back before she could make it beyond the building's threshold.

She wasn't accused of engaging in any violence or property damage. Dillon pleaded guilty in July to misdemeanor disorderly conduct in a Capitol building.
Amazingly, her idiotic tweet is still up there.
1636077736402.png
 

PF5

Deputy
Jan 3, 2014
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Ex-MMA Fighter Gets 41 Months in 1st Sentence for Capitol Riot Violence

A former mixed martial arts fighter who pleaded guilty to assaulting a police officer during the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol was sentenced Wednesday to 41 months in prison. Federal prosecutors had recommended a sentence of 44 months.
Scott Fairlamb, 44, of New Jersey, is the first person sentenced for assaulting a law enforcement officer during the Capitol riot, and his sentence is the longest a rioter has received. Judge Royce Lamberth's sentencing decision is considered a “canary in the coal mine” indicator of what punishment dozens of other rioters could receive for acts of violence.
The offense cut at the heart of American democracy, Lamberth said, expressing outrage over what Fairlamb was caught on video doing. “It’s such a serious crime that I can’t give a below-guideline” sentence,” he said.
Fairlamb spoke and teared up in court on Wednesday as he said his father was a veteran who served the United States proudly. He apologized for disgracing his family’s name and called his behavior “irresponsible” and “reckless.” He said he “takes responsibility” for what he did. He referenced health problems including cancer and a cardiac issue.
A prosecutor argued that the federal sentencing guidelines were important to follow, ahead of similar cases in the future. Fairlamb solicited donations and already has collected $30,000, the attorney said, asking the judge to impose a fine and saying it’s “not right” for the defendant to financially benefit from Jan 6.
Fairlamb’s defense attorney argued for a “time served” sentence. He’s been jailed since his Jan. 22 arrest at his home in Stockholm, New Jersey. The attorney said it was “rare” to see such a “commendable” person “take such a wrong step.” The lawyer also argued that pretrial detention time in D.C.’s jail has been harsh and should count toward leniency.
In addition to the prison term, Lamberth ordered Fairlamb to pay $2,000 in restitution and be under supervised release for three years.

Fairlamb picked up a police baton as he joined the mob that broke past a line of police officers and breached the Capitol, according to prosecutors. A video showed him holding the collapsible baton and shouting, “What [do] patriots do? We f------ disarm them and then we storm the f------ Capitol!”
After he left the building, Fairlamb was caught on video following a line of police officers.
“You guys have no idea what the f--- you’re doing,” he can be seen screaming into an officer’s face, surrounded by people waving flags in support of President Donald Trump.

Fairlamb is seen pushing a Metropolitan Police Department officer, pointing a finger in his face and then punching him. The officer said he didn't suffer any physical injuries, according to prosecutors.
Prosecutors said Fairlamb, who owned Fairlamb Fit gym in Pompton Lakes, New Jersey, incited and emboldened other rioters around him with his violent actions.
“Law enforcement officers were overwhelmed, outnumbered, and in some cases, in serious danger. The rule of law was not only disrespected; it was under attack that day,” prosecutors wrote in a court filing.
An eight-month prison term was previously the longest sentence among the nearly two dozen rioters who have been sentenced. A man who posted threats connected to Jan. 6 but didn't storm the Capitol was sentenced to 14 months in prison.
Defense attorney Harley Breite said during an interview last month that he intended to ask the judge to sentence Fairlamb to the time he already has served in jail, allowing for his immediate release.
“Had this not occurred on federal property, my client would be facing a trespassing and simple assault [case] in any municipal court in this country,” Breite said. “Most importantly, my client has expressed sincere remorse for his actions of that day. And those actions are not indicative of who he really is."
 

PF5

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Jan 3, 2014
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Trump launches last-ditch effort to stop Jan. 6 committee from obtaining White House records on Friday

Lawyers for former President Donald Trump on Thursday asked a federal appeals court to temporarily block the National Archives from turning over his White House records to the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol.
The committee is set to receive the first batch of documents, which lawmakers say is key to their investigation, on Friday. In papers filed with the appeals court Thursday, lawyers for Trump asked the court to temporarily delay the turnover and "maintain the status quo" while they push ahead with an expedited appeal.

Trump has tried to claim executive privilege over the documents, and contends the records should be kept secret "in perpetuity."

White House counsel Dana Remus told the National Archives in a letter obtained by NBC News that the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol was "the most serious attack on the operations of the Federal government since the Civil War," and that Trump's efforts to keep Congress in the dark about what happened "is not in the best interests of the United States."

Judge Tanya Chutkan of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia denied a similar request from Trump's team to "maintain the status quo" earlier this week, noting that that "the status quo in this case" is that the National Archives will disclose the documents on Nov. 12 “absent any intervening court order.”
Her ruling was one of a trio she issued this past week refusing Trump's demand his records be kept secret.

“Plaintiff does not acknowledge the deference owed to the incumbent President’s judgment. His position that he may override the express will of the executive branch appears to be premised on the notion that his executive power ‘exists in perpetuity,’" she wrote. "But Presidents are not kings, and Plaintiff is not President.”
Trump has also argued that certain witnesses who've been subpoenaed by the committee should not have to answer questions because of executive privilege as well. One of them, former Trump adviser Steve Bannon, is the subject of a criminal referral to the Justice Department for refusing to cooperate at all.
 

TheMonkey

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What truth do you think is hidden? That Bannon knew there were going to be protests?
Then it’s silly he’s refusing to testify. He should show up and say that’s what he knew. I mean, since he’s innocent of any wrongdoing apparently.
 
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Then it’s silly he’s refusing to testify. He should show up and say that’s what he knew. I mean, since he’s innocent of any wrongdoing apparently.
I think he is just an ass and is trying to continue a claim that he doesn’t have to testify. But that didn’t answer my question. Again, what truth do you think is hidden?

Are you expecting smoking gun information that Bannon coordinated an attack on the Capitol? That Trump did? That Bannon or Trump promised to fund bail money for protesters/rioters?
 
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TheMonkey

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I think he is just an ass and is trying to continue a claim that he doesn’t have to testify. But that didn’t answer my question. Again, what truth do you think is hidden?

Are you expecting smoking gun information that Bannon coordinated an attack on the Capitol? That Trump did? That Bannon or Trump promised to fund bail money for protesters/rioters?
Are you saying you are confident Brannon had no connection to the groups that helped lead and organize the attack?