James Webb Telescope first images

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TheMonkey

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#21
Not necessarily. If we want to know the answer to life, the universe, and everything we have to know what existed before the big bang.

42
At one time scientists thought the universe cycled from Big Bang to eventually slowing down and contracting back to a singular mass the size of a grapefruit, which then led to another Big Bang, repeating over and over. I think they realized the universe expansion is accelerating and abandoned that theory.
 
Feb 11, 2007
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#22
The size and complexity of the Universe is hard to even imagine. Earendel the most distant body found also labeled "morning star" or "earlylight" is said to be 12.9 billion light years (light traveling 186,000 miles per second) away. It took several years using our latest detection devices to even discern that it was not just a wave from other lights. Again...it boggles my mind to think of the size and complexity of our Universe.
Beyond all this is dark energy which composes an estimated 95% of the universe. We can not see it but know it must be there because it seems to be causing the expansion of the universe.
 

Boomer.....

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Feb 15, 2007
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#29
The $10 Billion Webb Telescope Has Been Permanently Damaged, Say Scientists

Scientists are reporting that damage sustained to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) during a micrometeoroid strike in late May 2022 may be worse than first thought.

In a new paper published in the wake of Webb’s incredible first images last week a group of scientists outlined the performance of the space telescope during its commissioning phase.

They reported problems that “cannot be corrected” as well as a “small effect on the telescope throughput, which is not yet measurable.”

Writing about the projected lifetime of the Webb telescope the report said: “At present, the largest source of uncertainty is long term effects of micrometeoroid impacts that slowly degrade the primary mirror.”

As I previously reported Webb’s primary 6.5-meter mirror comprises 18 beryllium-gold segments. One of them, called C3, was struck by small dust particles between May 23 and 25, 2022.

Since launch Webb has been struck by five other, smaller micrometeoroids. One minor strike per month is roughly what engineers predicted pre-launch.

“After initial assessments, the team found the telescope is still performing at a level that exceeds all mission requirements,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, Associate Administrator at NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, in a tweet after the C3 strike.

However, the new report suggests that the damage to the C3 segment could be more serious than first thought.

“Of the six micrometeoroid strikes detected thus far through wavefront sensing, five had negligible effects,” reads the report. Wavefront sensing refers to the aberrations found in Webb’s optics. “By contrast, the micrometeoroid which hit segment C3 in the period 22—24 May 2022 UT caused significant uncorrectable change in the overall figure of that segment.”

Moreover, the report said that this event “exceeded prelaunch expectations of damage for a single micrometeoroid, triggering further investigation and modeling by the JWST Project.”

Although it may have enough propellant to last 20 years—a decade longer than previously expected—the engineers who designed Webb know that its mirrors and sunshield will unavoidably slowly degrade from micrometeoroid impacts.

It’s also expected that Webb’s detectors will be gradually damaged by charged particles while its sunshield and innovative five-layer insulation will degrade from space weathering.

Since its mirror is exposed to space micrometeoroid strikes are difficult for Webb to avoid. “Inevitably, any spacecraft will encounter micrometeoroids,” reads the report, which described “six localized surface deformations on the primary mirror that are attributed to impact by micrometeoroids.”

Was the “C3 impact” a fluke? “It is not yet clear whether the May 2022 hit to segment C3 was a rare event or whether the telescope may be more susceptible to damage by micrometeoroids than pre-launch modeling predicted,” said the report.

It’s hoped that it was merely a once-in-several-years event, but the team will now investigate the micrometeoroid population in Webb’s vicinity, how impacts affect beryllium-gold mirrors and how it mitigates further strikes.

A possible solution could be to minimize time spent looking in the direction of orbital motion, which statistically has higher micrometeoroid rates and energies, said the report.

A $10 billion space telescope that sees in the infrared, Webb launched on Christmas Day in 2021 and has since February been orbiting the L2 point about a million miles/1.6 million kilometres from Earth.

Wishing you clear skies and wide eyes.
 
Nov 6, 2010
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#32
I so want to post the scrotum eclipse from a few years back, I just can't manage to find a good clip of it.
 

llcoolw

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#34
At one time scientists thought the universe cycled from Big Bang to eventually slowing down and contracting back to a singular mass the size of a grapefruit, which then led to another Big Bang, repeating over and over. I think they realized the universe expansion is accelerating and abandoned that theory.
I remember this theory emerging ( The Big Crunch ) and then that took me to my crazy place.

The Big Bang moves forward in time only due to chemical reactions going in one direction so, the inverse could also be true.

You could be born out of the grave or crematorium into old age. Walk backwards. Talk backwards. All the way back to the womb.
 

llcoolw

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Feb 7, 2005
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#35
I remember this theory emerging ( The Big Crunch ) and then that took me to my crazy place.

The Big Bang moves forward in time only due to chemical reactions going in one direction so, the inverse could also be true.

You could be born out of the grave or crematorium into old age. Walk backwards. Talk backwards. All the way back to the womb.
But then the next question is, would you remember the first time doing it the second time?
 

TheMonkey

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Sep 16, 2004
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#36
I remember this theory emerging ( The Big Crunch ) and then that took me to my crazy place.

The Big Bang moves forward in time only due to chemical reactions going in one direction so, the inverse could also be true.

You could be born out of the grave or crematorium into old age. Walk backwards. Talk backwards. All the way back to the womb.
So, we discover Benjamin Button was actually a documentary? ;)
 

Jostate

Identifies as a Cowboys fan
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Jun 24, 2005
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#37
The $10 Billion Webb Telescope Has Been Permanently Damaged, Say Scientists

Scientists are reporting that damage sustained to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) during a micrometeoroid strike in late May 2022 may be worse than first thought.

In a new paper published in the wake of Webb’s incredible first images last week a group of scientists outlined the performance of the space telescope during its commissioning phase.

They reported problems that “cannot be corrected” as well as a “small effect on the telescope throughput, which is not yet measurable.”

Writing about the projected lifetime of the Webb telescope the report said: “At present, the largest source of uncertainty is long term effects of micrometeoroid impacts that slowly degrade the primary mirror.”

As I previously reported Webb’s primary 6.5-meter mirror comprises 18 beryllium-gold segments. One of them, called C3, was struck by small dust particles between May 23 and 25, 2022.

Since launch Webb has been struck by five other, smaller micrometeoroids. One minor strike per month is roughly what engineers predicted pre-launch.

“After initial assessments, the team found the telescope is still performing at a level that exceeds all mission requirements,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, Associate Administrator at NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, in a tweet after the C3 strike.

However, the new report suggests that the damage to the C3 segment could be more serious than first thought.

“Of the six micrometeoroid strikes detected thus far through wavefront sensing, five had negligible effects,” reads the report. Wavefront sensing refers to the aberrations found in Webb’s optics. “By contrast, the micrometeoroid which hit segment C3 in the period 22—24 May 2022 UT caused significant uncorrectable change in the overall figure of that segment.”

Moreover, the report said that this event “exceeded prelaunch expectations of damage for a single micrometeoroid, triggering further investigation and modeling by the JWST Project.”

Although it may have enough propellant to last 20 years—a decade longer than previously expected—the engineers who designed Webb know that its mirrors and sunshield will unavoidably slowly degrade from micrometeoroid impacts.

It’s also expected that Webb’s detectors will be gradually damaged by charged particles while its sunshield and innovative five-layer insulation will degrade from space weathering.

Since its mirror is exposed to space micrometeoroid strikes are difficult for Webb to avoid. “Inevitably, any spacecraft will encounter micrometeoroids,” reads the report, which described “six localized surface deformations on the primary mirror that are attributed to impact by micrometeoroids.”

Was the “C3 impact” a fluke? “It is not yet clear whether the May 2022 hit to segment C3 was a rare event or whether the telescope may be more susceptible to damage by micrometeoroids than pre-launch modeling predicted,” said the report.

It’s hoped that it was merely a once-in-several-years event, but the team will now investigate the micrometeoroid population in Webb’s vicinity, how impacts affect beryllium-gold mirrors and how it mitigates further strikes.

A possible solution could be to minimize time spent looking in the direction of orbital motion, which statistically has higher micrometeoroid rates and energies, said the report.

A $10 billion space telescope that sees in the infrared, Webb launched on Christmas Day in 2021 and has since February been orbiting the L2 point about a million miles/1.6 million kilometres from Earth.

Wishing you clear skies and wide eyes.
If I understand correctly, we saved our pennies for 2 decades, went out and bought a new car for ten Billion dollars, then on the way home from the car lot got stuck behind a gravel truck bouncing gravel off down the road?
 

UrbanCowboy1

Some cowboys gots smarts real good like me.
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#39
https://iai.tv/articles/the-big-bang-didnt-happen-auid-2215



Pretty decent read on how the JWT has proven the Big Bang to be false.
So, read up on this. That's definitely not a reputable article. But, just like some people claim that aliens must be real because we sometimes capture things on film that aren't immediately explained, there is a bit more going on here.

For those that don't want to read the article, the problem is that JWST appears to have taken pictures of galaxies from the early universe that are too developed. They have too many stars and the stars are too old for them to have been 'born' only 200-300 million years earlier. And before anyone has even verified the measurements, the article's author has claimed "HA! I knew the Big Bang was false!" when there are several explanations that would account for this age discrepancy and should be looked at. BBT is a solid theory that has decades of predictions that have been proven true. Taking one piece of evidence and then tossing the entire theory out the window is... well.. let's be polite and call it immature.


But before any bold proclamations are made, it's important to remember they need to take more measurements of these super old galaxies. The way they are measuring ages right now is a super basic method that's a best guess until the real data comes in. We need at least another 6 months of observations to 'triangulate' on these galaxies. (triangulate isn't the right word for this, but everyone will know what that means), Until then I'll trust the theory. If new facts come out that require a rethink, then that will be truly exciting!
 

Jostate

Identifies as a Cowboys fan
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Jun 24, 2005
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#40
So, read up on this. That's definitely not a reputable article. But, just like some people claim that aliens must be real because we sometimes capture things on film that aren't immediately explained, there is a bit more going on here.

For those that don't want to read the article, the problem is that JWST appears to have taken pictures of galaxies from the early universe that are too developed. They have too many stars and the stars are too old for them to have been 'born' only 200-300 million years earlier. And before anyone has even verified the measurements, the article's author has claimed "HA! I knew the Big Bang was false!" when there are several explanations that would account for this age discrepancy and should be looked at. BBT is a solid theory that has decades of predictions that have been proven true. Taking one piece of evidence and then tossing the entire theory out the window is... well.. let's be polite and call it immature.


But before any bold proclamations are made, it's important to remember they need to take more measurements of these super old galaxies. The way they are measuring ages right now is a super basic method that's a best guess until the real data comes in. We need at least another 6 months of observations to 'triangulate' on these galaxies. (triangulate isn't the right word for this, but everyone will know what that means), Until then I'll trust the theory. If new facts come out that require a rethink, then that will be truly exciting!
At risk of rabbit holing this to something theological or philosophical I'll say the big bang theory is a hard one for me. Settle down science nerds I'm not about to go flat earth on you.

There are some who tend to lump big bang and evolution into the same sentence and say "see it's all a bunch of crap". To me, evolution is logical and there is a lot of science that supports it. I can fit it in the limited closet space of my mind. The big bang is far bigger, more theoretical, and harder for me to wrap my head around. Of course I don't have a great alternative and just saying "God did it" doesn't quite cover it for me. God and scientific theory don't have to be mutually exclusive, in my view.

All this is to say someone a lot smarter than myself scribbles a bunch of stuff on a chalk board and says "see, that's how it happened!" I'm not dismissing that, but I just won't be surprised, as our knowledge increases, if we find we missed the mark by a bit.