It seems even so-called "conservatives" need safe spaces too....

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CowboyJD

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#21
What do you call it when someone who has never been to Eskimo Joe's tries to rally a petition online to get rid of the Eskimo?
I call it the free and open exchange of ideas about allegedly or arguably racist trademarks and use of the economic marketplace pressure to discourage what they believe is a wrong and offensive depiction of the Indigenous Inuit people.

In other words, open competition in the marketplace of ideas.

I don’t know why they would actually need to go to Joe’s to have an idea or opinion about the trademark.

Furthermore, it was an idea/argument that was rejected by the marketplace of ideas and thought on the subject pretty resoundingly.
 
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CowboyJD

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#22
I was with you until you brought the kids into it. That's a little different issue.

BTW Angles has been in OKC since I was a kid. I remember several attempts at shutting the Rd Dog down but I've never heard of these attempts at closing gay bars. I'm sure it's happened somewhere but if Angles has survived 4 decades in OKC it's not as bad as you make it sound.
You don’t know the first thing about the history of the NW 39th street Enclave and Angles if you’ve “never heard of these attempts at closing gay bars in OKC....or elsewhere.

https://www.oklahoman.com/article/2039271/council-settles-out-of-court-with-club-for-homosexuals

The area still regularly sees anti-gay protests trying to shut particular bars or the whole area down.
 
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#23
The exact same thing as someone petitioning to get rid of a gay bar when they have never been to a gay bar. The person wanting to get rid of the Eskimo thinks that the cultural appropriation like that is harmful. The person wanting to get rid of gay people having a hangout thinks that being gay is harmful. And it is the same as the person wanting to stop a Drag Queen from talking to children about a children's book. Despite your attempts to call one "legislating morality" and the other "cancel culture" it is the same human nature of not liking something that someone else is doing and making attempts to stop it based on your feelings, not theirs.
But the underlying problem is postmordernism don't you think?
 

Jostate

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#24
I call it the free and open exchange of ideas about allegedly or arguably racist trademarks and use of the economic marketplace pressure to discourage what they believe is a wrong and offensive depiction of the Indigenous Inuit people.

In other words, open competition in the marketplace of ideas.

I don’t know why they would actually need to go to Joe’s to have an idea or opinion about the trademark.

Furthermore, it was an idea/argument that was rejected by the marketplace of ideas and thought on the subject pretty resoundingly.
Right a failed attempt at cancel culture.
 

Jostate

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#25
You don’t know the first thing about the history of the NW 39th street Enclave and Angles if you’ve “never heard of these attempts at closing gay bars in OKC....or elsewhere.

https://www.oklahoman.com/article/2039271/council-settles-out-of-court-with-club-for-homosexuals

The area still regularly sees anti-gay protests trying to shut particular bars or the whole area down.
A few redneck cops harassing a gay bar is not an attempt at cancel culture. Or maybe as you call it the cops were just participating in the marketplace of ideas, in their own way.
 

CowboyJD

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#26
Right a failed attempt at cancel culture.
Derp....

A few redneck cops harassing a gay bar is not an attempt at cancel culture. Or maybe as you call it the cops were just participating in the marketplace of ideas, in their own way.
Double derp...

Buh bye again, pigeon.

Damn me for giving you the benefit of the doubt.....again.
 

jobob85

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#27
Cop out.

I asked a follow-up question.

If you wanna bail though, no skin off my nose.

Also, it’s “counselor”.

If we were in England, it’d be “counsellor”.
Maybe I am in England.

I don;t think this satirical email was completely canceled with a public social media campaign. I was deemed inappropriate to send to certian students at Sanford Law and brought to the attention of the University. While the response was harsh and questionable, I don't think it fits with "cancel culture" as I know it.
 

CowboyJD

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#28
Maybe I am in England.

I don;t think this satirical email was completely canceled with a public social media campaign. I was deemed inappropriate to send to certian students at Sanford Law and brought to the attention of the University. While the response was harsh and questionable, I don't think it fits with "cancel culture" as I know it.
You’re not. Even if you were, you still misspelled it.

I guess I now desire your notion of “cancel culture” as you know it, because I think you’re gonna have a hard time distinguishing this rationally from examples that you do believe were engaging in cancel culture.

One definition I’ve seen bandied about...

“Cancel culture or call-out culture is a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles – whether it be online, on social media, or in person.”

This certainly meets that definition. They literally tried to cancel/ostracize him from the professional circles of lawyer by asking for his graduation from law school to be denied.
 

jobob85

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#30
You’re not. Even if you were, you still misspelled it.

I guess I now desire your notion of “cancel culture” as you know it, because I think you’re gonna have a hard time distinguishing this rationally from examples that you do believe were engaging in cancel culture.

One definition I’ve seen bandied about...

“Cancel culture or call-out culture is a modern form of ostracism in which someone is thrust out of social or professional circles – whether it be online, on social media, or in person.”

This certainly meets that definition. They literally tried to cancel/ostracize him from the professional circles of lawyer by asking for his graduation from law school to be denied.
I hadn't looked at it that way but, even so, he wasn't "canceled" at any and every law school graduation. I'm sure his credits could/would have transferred over to a law school sympathetic to his plight.
 

TheMonkey

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#31
I hadn't looked at it that way but, even so, he wasn't "canceled" at any and every law school graduation. I'm sure his credits could/would have transferred over to a law school sympathetic to his plight.
That’s practical. Who transfers to another school after completing their law degree? It also would have delayed his bar exam and jeopardized any opportunities he had lined up for employment.

“He said that he would not have been able to take the bar exam without his law school diploma, which he will receive on June 12.”
 

steross

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#32
I was with you until you brought the kids into it. That's a little different issue.
.
I agree it is different. So, one parent feels that any discussion of religion before a child is an adult is horrible as it is introducing a belief as if it is an adult reality. But, that parent is fine with his child being exposed to a drag queen as drag queens exist and he feels are not out to harm children.
Another parent wants to teach their child their religion but hates the idea of exposure to a drag queen.
i have never heard you complain about the exposure to religion that children get all of the time whether the parents want it or not. Yet, one drag queen writes a book and exposes about 8 kids and you are all over it.
I’m only pointing out your written biases while you want to act like a middle ground of judgement when decreeing this an issue of the left. It is a issue of humans.
 

steross

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#33
A few redneck cops harassing a gay bar is not an attempt at cancel culture. Or maybe as you call it the cops were just participating in the marketplace of ideas, in their own way.
Your ability to be condescending and minimize actual discrimination that harms people unlike you while writing with extreme hyperbole about discrimination that even theoretically could affect you or people like you is truly remarkable. I would think it was trolling in its ostentatious way other than you have been exactly the same for years.
 

jobob85

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#34
That’s practical. Who transfers to another school after completing their law degree? It also would have delayed his bar exam and jeopardized any opportunities he had lined up for employment.

“He said that he would not have been able to take the bar exam without his law school diploma, which he will receive on June 12.”
I get all that and agree it was a crappy thing to do. It just doesn't fit with what I believe "cancel culture" is. Not that I think my idea of what it means is right or wrong, just that it is mine. Maybe there are Micro and Macro versions, IDK.
 

TheMonkey

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#35
I get all that and agree it was a crappy thing to do. It just doesn't fit with what I believe "cancel culture" is. Not that I think my idea of what it means is right or wrong, just that it is mine. Maybe there are Micro and Macro versions, IDK.
I guess I don’t see the difference. A news anchor can go to another network. Authors can find other publishers. TV shows can find other distribution channels. Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

The existence of other opportunities doesn’t disqualify it from being cancel culture.
 

CowboyJD

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#36
I hadn't looked at it that way but, even so, he wasn't "canceled" at any and every law school graduation. I'm sure his credits could/would have transferred over to a law school sympathetic to his plight.
Yeah....no.

That’s not how law school works. He had finished instruction and was scheduled to graduate. Another law school isn’t just going to give him a degree and let graduate with a degree at a school he never received instruction from. Furthermore, a graduate degree from somewhere other than Stanford is very different in value in professional development and advancement.

Furthermore, as @TheMonkey pointed out, all those folks that you would consider victims of your particular definition of counter culture could transfer to an employer/business/publisher/whatever sympathetic to their plight as well.
 
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jobob85

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#37
Yeah....no.

That’s not how law school works. He had finished instruction and was scheduled to graduate. Another law school isn’t just going to give him a degree and let graduate with a degree at a school he never received instruction from. Furthermore, a graduate degree from somewhere other than Stanford is very different in value in professional development and advancement.

Furthermore, as @TheMonkey pointed out, all those folks that you would consider victims of your particular definition of counter culture could transfer to an employer/business/publisher/whatever sympathetic to their plight as well.
Every law school will accept transfers. I am sorry I wasn't clear on the fact that I didn't expect them to just award him a degree without completing some courses at the new university. Also, and I am assuming here, another university might make an exception to his circumstances and help him through without having to complete the normal transfer course load.

Given all that, I hadn't given credit to the fact that Stanfrod is a top 5 US law school.
 

Jostate

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#38
I agree it is different. So, one parent feels that any discussion of religion before a child is an adult is horrible as it is introducing a belief as if it is an adult reality. But, that parent is fine with his child being exposed to a drag queen as drag queens exist and he feels are not out to harm children.
Another parent wants to teach their child their religion but hates the idea of exposure to a drag queen.
i have never heard you complain about the exposure to religion that children get all of the time whether the parents want it or not. Yet, one drag queen writes a book and exposes about 8 kids and you are all over it.
I’m only pointing out your written biases while you want to act like a middle ground of judgement when decreeing this an issue of the left. It is a issue of humans.
I kind of avoid taking much of a stand on the political board as much lately because I seem to be making enemies, which I don't like to do. Honestly, I dropped the thing in here about the drag queen children's hour because I thought it might be a little common ground that we would all say " yeah that's getting a little weird". I was wrong. Live and learn.

As far as the religion, if PBS tried to have the Christian children's hour and someone from the church talked about Noah's Ark or Daniel in the Lion's den I think we both know that it wouldn't last as long as the drag queen's hips going swish, swish, swish.
 

wrenhal

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#39
After reading the article again, some things aren't clear.
Did he use the universities mail system for this and was the listserv hosted on campus? Would this make any difference?

The federalist society filed the complaint March 27th, because they were getting harassed because people thought this was real, why did it take the University so long to initiate the investigation?

I don't see anywhere on here where it says the federalist society wanted his diploma revoked or him not being allowed to graduate. It appears that that is a process of Stanford University when they investigate so close to graduation. So why is everybody saying that the Federalist society are the ones that asked for it?
And that goes back to why didn't the university investigate sooner instead of waiting until the federalist society had to prod them to investigate? Shouldn't they investigate all complaints?

My opinion is okay satire, who cares. But if he presented it as if it was fact and it caused harm to them in regards to loss of speakers and harassment by people, then there needs to be some way that he can be held accountable for it. But there's no way to tell because the actual message he sent to the listserv is not shown.
I also believe that the university made this worse than it had to be by dragging their heels on starting the investigation. I don't think the federalist society was wanting to cancel him, they simply wanted some form of justice to be attempted in the fact that he was trying to represent that flyer as real and cause harm to their organization.
I mean we don't honestly know if he meant it as satire or not.

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TheMonkey

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#40
After reading the article again, some things aren't clear.
Did he use the universities mail system for this and was the listserv hosted on campus? Would this make any difference?

The federalist society filed the complaint March 27th, because they were getting harassed because people thought this was real, why did it take the University so long to initiate the investigation?

I don't see anywhere on here where it says the federalist society wanted his diploma revoked or him not being allowed to graduate. It appears that that is a process of Stanford University when they investigate so close to graduation. So why is everybody saying that the Federalist society are the ones that asked for it?
And that goes back to why didn't the university investigate sooner instead of waiting until the federalist society had to prod them to investigate? Shouldn't they investigate all complaints?

My opinion is okay satire, who cares. But if he presented it as if it was fact and it caused harm to them in regards to loss of speakers and harassment by people, then there needs to be some way that he can be held accountable for it. But there's no way to tell because the actual message he sent to the listserv is not shown.
I also believe that the university made this worse than it had to be by dragging their heels on starting the investigation. I don't think the federalist society was wanting to cancel him, they simply wanted some form of justice to be attempted in the fact that he was trying to represent that flyer as real and cause harm to their organization.
I mean we don't honestly know if he meant it as satire or not.

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Lots of assumptions and benefit given in one direction, but I posted the email in the 2nd post on this thread.
The problem is it was too believable. Ken Paxton’s bio is spot-on.
View attachment 90510
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