GOP truly has become a parody of themselves

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TheMonkey

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#22
Holy crap, I'm trying to stay away from the politics side of the board, but with all the things going on out there someone has the nerve to act like Republicans have cornered the market on irrationality? end of quote
They haven’t cornered the market. They still believe in free market capitalism. But they are the clear market leaders, IMHO.

And I’ve brought it up before, but generalization (everybody does it) is an incredibly weak argument. Classic logical fallacy.
 

wrenhal

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#23
From the NY Times:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/05/opinion/gentrification-los-angeles-little-library.html

INGLEWOOD, Calif. — About a year ago, I decided to build a library on my front lawn. By library, I mean one of those little free-standing library boxes that dot lawns in bedroom communities around the country — charming, birdhouse-like structures filled with books that invite neighbors and passers-by to take a book, or donate a book, or both.

Then one morning, glancing out my front window, I saw a young white couple stopped at the library. Instantly, I was flooded with emotions — astonishment, and then resentment, and then astonishment at my resentment. It all converged into a silent scream in my head of, Get off my lawn!

What I resented was not this specific couple. It was their whiteness, and my feelings of helplessness at not knowing how to maintain the integrity of a Black space that I had created.
This lady is confused. She did something normal and cute, but she seems to want to see everything through race and is trying to force a square peg into a round hole.

--------------------------------------------

Prepandemic, Inglewood was gentrifying, another reason I’d been inspired to do the library: I wanted to signal to my longtime neighbors that we had our own ideas about improvement, and could carry them out in our own way. There are organizations that help people build these little libraries, but I did mine independently. I envisioned it as a place for my neighbors to stay connected during the pandemic. The wooden post on which the library sat was a stake in the ground, literally.

The response to the library was slow at first — it was the first in the area, and some people mistook it for a birdhouse, or a mailbox. But I was pleased to soon see people stopping by to browse and take home books.

Then one morning, glancing out my front window, I saw a young white couple stopped at the library. Instantly, I was flooded with emotions — astonishment, and then resentment, and then astonishment at my resentment. It all converged into a silent scream in my head of, Get off my lawn!

The moment jolted me into realizing some things I’m not especially proud of. I had set out this library for all who lived here, and even for those who didn’t, in theory. I would not want to restrict anyone from looking at it or taking books, based on race or anything else. But while I had seen white newcomers to the neighborhood here and there, the truth was, I hadn’t set it out to appeal to white residents.

Now that they were in front of my house, curious about this new neighborhood attraction, I didn’t know how to feel. By bringing this modern cultural artifact here from white neighborhoods, had I set myself up, set up the neighborhood? Was I contributing to gentrification and sending the wrong message about how I wanted the neighborhood to be?

What I resented was not this specific couple. It was their whiteness, and my feelings of helplessness at not knowing how to maintain the integrity of a Black space that I had created. I was seeing up close how fragile that space can be, how its meaning can be changed in my mind, even by people who have no conscious intention to change it. That library was on my lawn, but for that moment it became theirs. I built it and drove it into the ground because I love books and always have. But I suddenly felt that I could not own even this, something that was clearly andintimately mine.

As the couple wandered on, no books in hand, I thought about how fragile my feeling of being settled is. It didn’t matter that I own my house, as many of my neighbors do. Generations of racism, Jim Crow, disinvestment and redlining have meant that we don’t really control our own spaces. In that moment, I had been overwhelmed by a kind of fear, one that’s connected to the historical reality of Black people being run off the land they lived on, expelled by force, high prices or some whim of white people.

One of the most famous examples of that displacement happened several miles south of Inglewood. Bruce’s Beach, a Black-owned resort, once thrived along the coast of tony Manhattan Beach, until it was seized by eminent domain in 1924 by white city officials. They claimed they needed the land for a public park, but they didn’t build one for more than three decades. It’s clear they simply wanted the bustling holiday and leisure spot and the Black people it attracted gone. That parcel was recently returned to the descendants of Willa and Charles Bruce, who owned it — an extraordinary example of reparation, but an isolated one that still leaves the problem of Black unsettledness intact.

When my uncle, Paul Aubry, bought a house in Los Angeles in the predominantly white, working-class South Central neighborhood of the late 1940s, he wasn’t just buying a house; he was putting his stake in the ground, making his claim to the American ideal of belonging.

My uncle’s claim was rejected. A cross was burned on his lawn. As more Black families moved to the neighborhood, white people moved out in droves. The ground shifted under Uncle Paul’s feet. That white flight forged the chiefly Black and brown South Central of popular imagination and created similar demographics in other city neighborhoods across the country, including Inglewood.

It has to be said that there’s nothing inherently wrong with the Black-, Latino- and immigrant-rich neighborhoods that resulted from those flights. Community has always been our greatest asset, and its greatest source of capital. But now, as younger generations of white people move back to the neighborhoods their parents shunned, in the phenomenon I call “white return,” it all suddenly feels up for grabs — again.

Instead of the blatant racism of what happened at Bruce’s Beach, we now have gentrification. It’s perfectly legal, but ultimately it causes the same racial displacement, on a much larger scale. The stratospheric rise in home prices alone has meant that the Black population of Los Angeles has been declining for decades, and has dropped to around 9 percent.

The anti-gentrification strategy articulated by many of my longtime Black neighbors is this: Stay put. Don’t sell. Stand your ground. While that is possible for some of us (I won’t be selling because, really, where would I go?), it’s not for everyone, and it’s not a permanent solution. It also doesn’t solve the bigger crisis of belonging.

Ultimately, the moment with the couple I saw through my window raised for me a serious moral question about how I should act. Screaming at them to get off my lawn would be adopting the values of the oppressor, as my racial-justice activist father used to say. Yet my resentment was not analogous to the white resentment of generations past (and of now, I’d argue). White resentment has always been legitimized, and reinforced, by legal and cultural dominance, a dynamic evident in everything from the rise of Trumpism to the current battle against the political boogeyman of critical race theory.

My little library, affirming as it is, is also an illusion; it can’t save our neighborhood. Still, in 2021, it has become increasingly important to maintain and grow Black space, on its own terms. As I watched the white couple peruse my little library, the most complicated feeling of all was the brief, bittersweet satisfaction I took in watching them drawn to my lawn, and to my idea. It felt empowering and hopeful on the one hand, defeating on the other.

So what message do I hope they took from my library? The same message I wanted to send to the rest of my neighbors, my community: Black presence has value — in every sense of the word, and on its own terms.

That value should make the casual displacement of Black people untenable, even immoral. And that will take much more than a little library to rectify.

Erin Aubry Kaplan (@aubry_erin) is a journalist and author who has lived in Inglewood, Calif., since 2001


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#25
This lady is confused. She did something normal and cute, but she seems to want to see everything through race and is trying to force a square peg into a round hole.

--------------------------------------------

Prepandemic, Inglewood was gentrifying, another reason I’d been inspired to do the library: I wanted to signal to my longtime neighbors that we had our own ideas about improvement, and could carry them out in our own way. There are organizations that help people build these little libraries, but I did mine independently. I envisioned it as a place for my neighbors to stay connected during the pandemic. The wooden post on which the library sat was a stake in the ground, literally...What I resented was not this specific couple. It was their whiteness, and my feelings of helplessness at not knowing how to maintain the integrity of a Black space that I had created...
Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
So she leads us to believe it's a place for ALL neighbors, Black or White, but then clearly let's us know it's "a Black space". Maybe her next improvement project should be an adjacent sign stating "Black neighbors only".
 

Jostate

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#26
So she leads us to believe it's a place for ALL neighbors, Black or White, but then clearly let's us know it's "a Black space". Maybe her next improvement project should be an adjacent sign stating "Black neighbors only".
There are nuts and racists on both sides. The part that amazes me is the NYT thought it was a good idea to run this.
 
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Mar 11, 2006
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#27
Holy crap, I'm trying to stay away from the politics side of the board, but with all the things going on out there someone has the nerve to act like Republicans have cornered the market on irrationality? end of quote
This thread could be titled “Tell me you only consume media that validates your bias without telling me you only consume media that validates your bias”
 

TheMonkey

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#30
If you don’t know your bias then you are not very self-aware. But I suspect you, along with some, know their own bias.
But I thought I told you my bias without telling you. Otherwise, how would you know what media validates my bias?
 

steross

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#31
Holy crap, I'm trying to stay away from the politics side of the board, but with all the things going on out there someone has the nerve to act like Republicans have cornered the market on irrationality? end of quote
Democrats are being what they have been for years. The Republicans have changed significantly. Bob Dole just died and was a classic republican leader. Compare him to Trump, Gaetz, McCarthy as what is republican leadership these days.
 

steross

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#32
From the NY Times:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/05/opinion/gentrification-los-angeles-little-library.html

INGLEWOOD, Calif. — About a year ago, I decided to build a library on my front lawn. By library, I mean one of those little free-standing library boxes that dot lawns in bedroom communities around the country — charming, birdhouse-like structures filled with books that invite neighbors and passers-by to take a book, or donate a book, or both.

Then one morning, glancing out my front window, I saw a young white couple stopped at the library. Instantly, I was flooded with emotions — astonishment, and then resentment, and then astonishment at my resentment. It all converged into a silent scream in my head of, Get off my lawn!

What I resented was not this specific couple. It was their whiteness, and my feelings of helplessness at not knowing how to maintain the integrity of a Black space that I had created.
Of course, you cut off the rest of the article that explains the historic context of why it was a feeling she felt.

You poor white man being slighted (out of context) in the NYT. At least you’ve got your safe space here to protect your fragile feelings from our world that is just so rough on your kind now.
 

wrenhal

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Aug 11, 2011
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#33
From the NY Times:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/05/opinion/gentrification-los-angeles-little-library.html

INGLEWOOD, Calif. — About a year ago, I decided to build a library on my front lawn. By library, I mean one of those little free-standing library boxes that dot lawns in bedroom communities around the country — charming, birdhouse-like structures filled with books that invite neighbors and passers-by to take a book, or donate a book, or both.

Then one morning, glancing out my front window, I saw a young white couple stopped at the library. Instantly, I was flooded with emotions — astonishment, and then resentment, and then astonishment at my resentment. It all converged into a silent scream in my head of, Get off my lawn!

What I resented was not this specific couple. It was their whiteness, and my feelings of helplessness at not knowing how to maintain the integrity of a Black space that I had created.
Of course, you cut off the rest of the article that explains the historic context of why it was a feeling she felt.

You poor white man being slighted (out of context) in the NYT. At least you’ve got your safe space here to protect your fragile feelings from our world that is just so rough on your kind now.
Her feeling that is basically that she's torn over the fact that she wants to feel a sense of community but her politics drives her to only want a sense of community with other black people.

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#35
Democrats are being what they have been for years. The Republicans have changed significantly. Bob Dole just died and was a classic republican leader. Compare him to Trump, Gaetz, McCarthy as what is republican leadership these days.
Hmmm — are you trying to prove my point above?

Dems were for open borders 15 years ago?
Dems were for eliminating college and other forms of debt 10 years ago?
Dems were for eliminating the filibuster 8 years ago?
Dems were for packing the Supreme Court 6 years ago?

Bill Clinton has not died but was a classic Democrat leader. Compare him to Adam Schiff, Ilan Omar, Cori Bush, or Eric Swalwell.

Partisans want to use party extremists (Gaetz and MTG on the right and Omar and AOC on the left) to attempt to paint the entire opposition party as crazies. Gaetz, MTG, Omar, and AOC are crazy, but their views are still the minority of their party. Saying one party have moved more than the other is a fools game.
 
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#36
Democrats are being what they have been for years. The Republicans have changed significantly. Bob Dole just died and was a classic republican leader. Compare him to Trump, Gaetz, McCarthy as what is republican leadership these days.
I don’t recall the former party of Joe Lieberman supporting a defund the police movement, nor do I recall the same party supporting no bail and no prosecution policies. Also don’t recall that……, well, you get the idea.
 

steross

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#37
Hmmm — are you trying to prove my point above?

Dems were for open borders 15 years ago?
Dems were for eliminating college and other forms of debt 10 years ago?
Dems were for eliminating the filibuster 8 years ago?
Dems were for packing the Supreme Court 6 years ago?

Bill Clinton has not died but was a classic Democrat leader. Compare him to Adam Schiff, Ilan Omar, Cori Bush, or Eric Swalwell.

Partisans want to use party extremists (Gaetz and MTG on the right and Omar and AOC on the left) to attempt to paint the entire opposition party as crazies. Gaetz, MTG, Omar, and AOC are crazy, but their views are still the minority of their party. Saying one party have moved more than the other is a fools game.
Why did you leave the very first name that I listed to try to make your point?
Because, it destroys your point.

And, I need to see some links to those democratic leaders calling for open borders unless we can say BS hyperbole now like republican leaders want to bring back segregation.
 

steross

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#38
I don’t recall the former party of Joe Lieberman supporting a defund the police movement, nor do I recall the same party supporting no bail and no prosecution policies. Also don’t recall that……, well, you get the idea.
Leadership is the topic for those that can keep up. Name one leader calling for that.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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#40
Leadership is the topic for those that can keep up. Name one leader calling for that.
The OP article was about a fringe Wisconsin GOP candidate that no one has ever heard of …and that was used as the example that GOP has become a parody of themselves. That candidate was not GOP leadership.

Maybe the “need to keep up”should be directed elsewhere.

Maybe, just maybe, you could see both parties have loons.