FDA approves first Alzheimer drug in 20 years, Sticker SHOCK as price revealed

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Binman4OSU

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Biogen has been given the green light to treat Alzheimers by the FDA and is the first new drug for the disease in 20 years.

Biogen CEO Michel Vounatsos announced the list price for the drug cost $56,000 per year to take.

Biogen vowed not to hike the price of the drug from this initial starting price per year for at least 4 years

https://twitter.com/CNBC/status/1402242079431012355
 

oks10

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I understand why something like this has a large price tag but surely I'm not the only one that sees it as a waste of money from the consumer side right?... I would hope that if I'm old and have Alzheimer's that my children would be smarter than to put me on a $56k/yr medication that might work.

What's that cost compared to putting someone in assisted living? I guess if it's close (and does actually work) then I could see the benefit.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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#5
I understand why something like this has a large price tag but surely I'm not the only one that sees it as a waste of money from the consumer side right?... I would hope that if I'm old and have Alzheimer's that my children would be smarter than to put me on a $56k/yr medication that might work.

What's that cost compared to putting someone in assisted living? I guess if it's close (and does actually work) then I could see the benefit.
My mother passed from Alz in 2018. She was fortunate, in the fact my father had the foresight to have long term care for her. That 8k per month paid for her Alz housing. We kept her as long as we could and ultimately had to put her in a memory care facility for her own safety. We also , toward the end, had to have her watched 24/7 by LPN's at 30k per month. If there was a viable drug that would have slowed or sustained her mental acuity. I would have done it. Its a very emotional thing to see your loved one suffer and deteriorate, it would be hard to put a price on stopping the suffering. At the end of the day, families will try to grasp on to anything they can in hopes of saving mom or dad. I equate it to the older person that runs back into the burning house for the photo album. Alz is a horrible disease.
 
Last edited:
Mar 11, 2006
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#6
My MIL was first diagnosed with Alz in 2007. By 2009 it was very noticeable, by 2011 she rarely recognized my wife. By 2013, she hardly opened her eyes --- yet her body was remarkable and she lived until 2019.
If there was a drug that would slow her degeneration of her mind and would have given even an extra year of cognition --- I know my wife would have wanted to pay for it.
But $56K -- wow.

My across the street neighbor is in his late forties. He was diagnosed with Leukemia three years ago. He has a miracle drug that the doctors say is 95% effective, but it cost $9k/month (daily pill). Luckily he is an very good attorney and has great insurance --- but a lifesaving drug costing over $100k/year seems excessive.
 

oks10

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My mother passed from Alz in 2018. She was fortunate, in the fact my father had the foresight to have long term care for her. That 8k per month paid for her Alz housing. We kept her as long as we could and ultimately had to put her in a memory care facility for her own safety. We also , toward the end, had to have her watched 24/7 by LPN's at 30k per month. If there was a viable drug that would have slowed or sustained her mental acuity. I would have done it. Its a very emotional thing to see your loved one suffer and deteriorate, it would be hard to put a price on stopping the suffering. At the end of the day, families will try to grasp on to anything they can in hopes of saving mom or dad. I equate it to the older person that runs back into the burning house for the photo album. Alz is a horrible disease.
I don't personally have any direct experience with it, so thanks for the explanation.
 
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#8
I think most of us understand that big Pharma is corrupt. A perfect example of that is jacking the price of insulin not a new miracle drug!!


Rising Insulin Costs

While this product has been unchanged, its price increased by 353% over a 15-year period between 2001 and 2016 and it continues to rise 12. Humulin U500 has increased from $170 to more than $1400 since 198713. From 2001 to 2019, the price of Humalog increased 1200% for a vial of insulin14.

I understand we live in a free market but this is shameful. And The practice should be outlawed and we should punished the perpetrators who commit this crime.
The companies that commit this type of crime only alibi is “ it’s there fiduciary duty to their shareholders to maximize profits”.
Only in America.
 

wrenhal

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#9
I think most of us understand that big Pharma is corrupt. A perfect example of that is jacking the price of insulin not a new miracle drug!!


Rising Insulin Costs

While this product has been unchanged, its price increased by 353% over a 15-year period between 2001 and 2016 and it continues to rise 12. Humulin U500 has increased from $170 to more than $1400 since 198713. From 2001 to 2019, the price of Humalog increased 1200% for a vial of insulin14.

I understand we live in a free market but this is shameful. And The practice should be outlawed and we should punished the perpetrators who commit this crime.
The companies that commit this type of crime only alibi is “ it’s there fiduciary duty to their shareholders to maximize profits”.
Only in America.
Or epi-pens.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

cowboyinexile

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@Jostate

You mentioned you were looking for stuff we all agree on. I think drug prices is a good place to start. Diabetes and Alzheimers don't care about politics but drug companies charging an arm and leg for medication they can produce for pennies on the dollar is bs. I get that they spend a lot of money on R&D but bumping the price of an effective medication many need to survive 300% just because they can is bs.
 

Jostate

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@Jostate

You mentioned you were looking for stuff we all agree on. I think drug prices is a good place to start. Diabetes and Alzheimers don't care about politics but drug companies charging an arm and leg for medication they can produce for pennies on the dollar is bs. I get that they spend a lot of money on R&D but bumping the price of an effective medication many need to survive 300% just because they can is bs.
The whole healthcare thing in general is one of those things that is so complex someone like me doesn't have much of a chance of knowing how to fix it. We just know it's wrong.
 

llcoolw

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#12
My mother passed from Alz in 2018. She was fortunate, in the fact my father had the foresight to have long term care for her. That 8k per month paid for her Alz housing. We kept her as long as we could and ultimately had to put her in a memory care facility for her own safety. We also , toward the end, had to have her watched 24/7 by LPN's at 30k per month. If there was a viable drug that would have slowed or sustained her mental acuity. I would have done it. Its a very emotional thing to see your loved one suffer and deteriorate, it would be hard to put a price on stopping the suffering. At the end of the day, families will try to grasp on to anything they can in hopes of saving mom or dad. I equate it to the older person that runs back into the burning house for the photo album. Alz is a horrible disease.
I’ve instructed my family to hand me a fatal dose of opiates when that time comes and I start losing it and acting crazy.

Woke up yesterday morning with a handful of pills. Hmmmm
 

llcoolw

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My mother passed from Alz in 2018. She was fortunate, in the fact my father had the foresight to have long term care for her. That 8k per month paid for her Alz housing. We kept her as long as we could and ultimately had to put her in a memory care facility for her own safety. We also , toward the end, had to have her watched 24/7 by LPN's at 30k per month. If there was a viable drug that would have slowed or sustained her mental acuity. I would have done it. Its a very emotional thing to see your loved one suffer and deteriorate, it would be hard to put a price on stopping the suffering. At the end of the day, families will try to grasp on to anything they can in hopes of saving mom or dad. I equate it to the older person that runs back into the burning house for the photo album. Alz is a horrible disease.
Sorry if it seems I’m making light of your loss. Not my intent. Making fun of mine.
 

TheMonkey

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We’re on the middle stage of this with my father-in-law. He forgets names (wife, kids, close friends) and gets confused easily. But take him to a car show and he’ll tell you all about the 70 year old cars you’re looking at.

He remarried about 10 years ago after my mother-in-law passed away. His current wife has been unfortunate. Her first husband died of Huntington’s disease, which is from hell. Her daughter is currently dying from the same thing. Eventually, she’ll lose my father-in-law to Alzheimer’s. That’s not fair at all.
 
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#16
Sorry if it seems I’m making light of your loss. Not my intent. Making fun of mine.
No offense taken.
We’re on the middle stage of this with my father-in-law. He forgets names (wife, kids, close friends) and gets confused easily. But take him to a car show and he’ll tell you all about the 70 year old cars you’re looking at.

He remarried about 10 years ago after my mother-in-law passed away. His current wife has been unfortunate. Her first husband died of Huntington’s disease, which is from hell. Her daughter is currently dying from the same thing. Eventually, she’ll lose my father-in-law to Alzheimer’s. That’s not fair at all.
sorry to hear people going through these things. I donate both money and time to Alz and Cancer orgs. The Alz walk is a great event.
 

llcoolw

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We’re on the middle stage of this with my father-in-law. He forgets names (wife, kids, close friends) and gets confused easily. But take him to a car show and he’ll tell you all about the 70 year old cars you’re looking at.

He remarried about 10 years ago after my mother-in-law passed away. His current wife has been unfortunate. Her first husband died of Huntington’s disease, which is from hell. Her daughter is currently dying from the same thing. Eventually, she’ll lose my father-in-law to Alzheimer’s. That’s not fair at all.
I’ve seen this before. Everything is crystal clear up to a certain president. In other words, ask them who the president is today. That answer will tell you when the decline started. Nan could remember everyone’s name in a 70 year old wedding album and jimmy carter. That was in 2007.
 
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#18
I’ve seen this before. Everything is crystal clear up to a certain president. In other words, ask them who the president is today. That answer will tell you when the decline started. Nan could remember everyone’s name in a 70 year old wedding album and jimmy carter. That was in 2007.
In my experience, it was like she was in a time warp. When she was first introduced into the hospital, with what we thought was a stroke. It turned out to be TIA strokes from Vascular dementia. I saw my mom as a little girl, a young adult, and a young mother. She would be in those moments for hours or days. It was hard on her, and hard on us. You just have to roll with the punches, and accept it. If you didn't , it was a fight. Just understand that they are still there but have a lack of comprehension of what is going on around them at the moment. Heck, while she was at the hospital, I would spend my days there and leave around the closing of visiting hours. The next morning, she told me she went to the clubs with the nurses that night. She was a handful.
 

llcoolw

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In my experience, it was like she was in a time warp. When she was first introduced into the hospital, with what we thought was a stroke. It turned out to be TIA strokes from Vascular dementia. I saw my mom as a little girl, a young adult, and a young mother. She would be in those moments for hours or days. It was hard on her, and hard on us. You just have to roll with the punches, and accept it. If you didn't , it was a fight. Just understand that they are still there but have a lack of comprehension of what is going on around them at the moment. Heck, while she was at the hospital, I would spend my days there and leave around the closing of visiting hours. The next morning, she told me she went to the clubs with the nurses that night. She was a handful.
Consciousness is such a hard subject to get ahold of. I’ve never heard about the roaming thought of age. Usually memory just stops at some wall. Everything prior to the wall works fine, after the wall and you’re lucky to be recognized. Was she ever in the present?