Equestrian Future

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Jun 27, 2018
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#1
It's assumed that Equestrian will go NCAA one day. I know at one time the plan was to renovate the old swine building as you come into Stillwater close to Western. But since then, equestrian facilities have been improved or built on McElroy.

Does anyone know if the plan with the swine barn is still in play? I think it can be turned into a very attractive facility if developed well.

Equestrian is one sport where OSU can add to it's number of national titles some day.
 
Jan 1, 2011
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#2
I vaguely remember that they tried one time with the NCAA, but there were not enough schools having a team to qualify the sport. Like i said, this is a memory and maybe wrong or partially right. I think it was an emerging sport, what ever that means.
 
Sep 12, 2008
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#4
The NCAA states, "Sports in the emerging sports program are expected to grow to 40 varsity teams within 10 years – the minimum level of sponsorship needed to be considered for the ultimate goal of becoming a full-fledged NCAA championship sport." Although the 10-year mark has been passed for equestrian, the sport remained on the list because of continued growth and support. However, it has faced several threats of removal from the list. In January 2016, some 200 college administrators voted for equestrian to continue in Division II at the NCAA Convention. There are currently 24 members.
 
Nov 8, 2013
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#5
The NCAA states, "Sports in the emerging sports program are expected to grow to 40 varsity teams within 10 years – the minimum level of sponsorship needed to be considered for the ultimate goal of becoming a full-fledged NCAA championship sport." Although the 10-year mark has been passed for equestrian, the sport remained on the list because of continued growth and support. However, it has faced several threats of removal from the list. In January 2016, some 200 college administrators voted for equestrian to continue in Division II at the NCAA Convention. There are currently 24 members.
Interesting. I had to look up the 24 teams. Some I have seen on the OSU Twitter feed. But others surprised me.

Auburn, Baylor, Brown (shock!), College of Charleston, Cornell, Dartmouth, Delaware State, Fresno State, Georgia, LIU Post (who?), Lynchburg, Minnesota Crookston, Oklahoma State, Sacred Heart, Seton Hill (not Seton Hall!), SMU, South Carolina, South Dakota State, Stonehill College, SUNY New Paltz (who?), Sweet Briar, TCU, Texas A&M, UC David, and UT (Tennessee) Martin.

That's an eclectic list of schools spanning big $ D1 universities, sports-heavy mid-majors (SDSU), and some small schools that you'd have to already know to have ever heard of them. But they span the nation pretty well - northeast, southeast, midwest, southwest, and west. The northwest and mountain west areas seem to be missing. I would suspect there could easily be some programs added from those areas. Would be nice to see this become a fully sanctioned NCAA women's sport. I know nothing about Equestrian, however, and can't speculate on what prevents its further growth. #firsteverpostonequestrianandverypossiblymylast :)
 

OkstateKerr

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Jan 13, 2005
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#6
Interesting. I had to look up the 24 teams. Some I have seen on the OSU Twitter feed. But others surprised me.

Auburn, Baylor, Brown (shock!), College of Charleston, Cornell, Dartmouth, Delaware State, Fresno State, Georgia, LIU Post (who?), Lynchburg, Minnesota Crookston, Oklahoma State, Sacred Heart, Seton Hill (not Seton Hall!), SMU, South Carolina, South Dakota State, Stonehill College, SUNY New Paltz (who?), Sweet Briar, TCU, Texas A&M, UC David, and UT (Tennessee) Martin.

That's an eclectic list of schools spanning big $ D1 universities, sports-heavy mid-majors (SDSU), and some small schools that you'd have to already know to have ever heard of them. But they span the nation pretty well - northeast, southeast, midwest, southwest, and west. The northwest and mountain west areas seem to be missing. I would suspect there could easily be some programs added from those areas. Would be nice to see this become a fully sanctioned NCAA women's sport. I know nothing about Equestrian, however, and can't speculate on what prevents its further growth. #firsteverpostonequestrianandverypossiblymylast :)
Problem with the sport is its very cost prohibitive. Expensive nonrevenue sports aren't really high on schools' priority lists.
 
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the truth

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Jul 9, 2004
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#7
Problem with the sport is its very cost prohibitive. Expensive nonrevenue sports aren't really high on schools' priority lists.
its a great offset for FB scholarships/participation tho. can't think of many other womens sports that will count that many numbers toward scholarship/participation like equestrian.
 
Aug 28, 2009
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#12
It's assumed that Equestrian will go NCAA one day.
I’d rather us start a women’s volleyball program and think it’s pretty weird that we don’t have one. I get we’re the Cowboys/girls, but I and I would assume the vast majority of other fans/students/alumni would be much more interested in that than equestrian
 
Sep 8, 2004
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#13
This article details the expenses a typical rider will encounter when deciding to take up equestrian:

https://equinehelper.com/is-horseback-riding-expensive/

The article estimates it takes $4K per year on the average. That's for beginners. Can't imagine how much it would be on a competitive collegiate level.

Seems to me, equestrian is destined to never be more than a niche sport, largely populated by upper middle class families. I hope we keep it, but we certainly should be looking at other women's sports as a potential (and more legitimate) replacement.
 
Apr 14, 2008
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#14
As a horse owner myself, I can tell you it's very expensive. Owned horses more expensive than BMW. Trust me at competitive level, you don't cut corners on care.
 

OkstateKerr

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Jan 13, 2005
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As a horse owner myself, I can tell you it's very expensive. Owned horses more expensive than BMW. Trust me at competitive level, you don't cut corners on care.
Not only that but the size isn't as large as the talent pool for say volleyball or gymnastics. Just aren't as many girls doing the sport because it is hard to keep and maintain horses.
 
Apr 14, 2009
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#16
I don’t believe that some of you folks understand just how this sport works. Maybe Y’all need to do your homework before you throw rocks. The kids don’t bring the houses to school with them. Or do they take them on the away meets.
 
Dec 11, 2011
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#17
I think what these guys are taking into account, is that nobody just takes up equestrian as a competitive sport when they show up to college. They've probably been doing it since they were extremely young, so while they may be provided all the facilities & amenities needed when they are students, they have to supply their own for the full time they are perfecting their craft growing up. That's years of $$$ to be proficient enough to not be a beginner when they are 18-19 & stepping on a college campus to be a member of the equestrian team.
 
Aug 16, 2012
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#18
Not only that but the size isn't as large as the talent pool for say volleyball or gymnastics. Just aren't as many girls doing the sport because it is hard to keep and maintain horses.
According to an OSU media story from 2019, while only five ladies compete in any single competition, there are 40 ladies in the program by University policy as the program is used as an offset for Title IX.

Same article states most of the animals are donated by alums and past team members which is a big cost savings. I tried to find the cost to run the program but could not. Closest I found were programs stating $500,000-$1,000,000 per year.

Wanted to verify this next comment before sharing it, but from what I read at the governing org's website, scholarship money is pooled across all equestrian programs with adjustments made to offset contributions by the individual schools. Typically, none of the ladies are on full scholarship, some are on partial, but most do it at their own expense. Again, I tried to find another source corroborating those claims but could not.
 
Aug 16, 2012
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#19
I think what these guys are taking into account, is that nobody just takes up equestrian as a competitive sport when they show up to college. They've probably been doing it since they were extremely young, so while they may be provided all the facilities & amenities needed when they are students, they have to supply their own for the full time they are perfecting their craft growing up. That's years of $$$ to be proficient enough to not be a beginner when they are 18-19 & stepping on a college campus to be a member of the equestrian team.
Also came across several other articles stating participation wanes because there is no "league" for future participation and as a spectator sport, most people give up horse interest around the end of HS. Pretty much sounds like you live it and love it, or move on around the time college starts. One article states a girl's horse obsession (an actual definable stage in a young girl's development apparently) only last three years typically.
 
Dec 11, 2011
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#20
I look at it like golf, which has also been talked about as a cost-prohibitive sport for people of less means. While you may be provided all the equipment, green fees, etc once you are a member of a competitive team, nobody is lining up to do that for someone who's never picked up a club before. Golf is a sport that you're not going to be a major collegiate level competitor unless you play almost daily for most of your life. That ain't cheap.