DNC self destruct in t minus 20

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Sep 6, 2012
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Edmond
#1
https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/11/02/clinton-brazile-hacks-2016-215774

Its a long article heres an excerpt

I had promised Bernie when I took the helm of the Democratic National Committee after the convention that I would get to the bottom of whether Hillary Clinton’s team had rigged the nomination process, as a cache of emails stolen by Russian hackers and posted online had suggested. I’d had my suspicions from the moment I walked in the door of the DNC a month or so earlier, based on the leaked emails. But who knew if some of them might have been forged? I needed to have solid proof, and so did Bernie.


So I followed the money. My predecessor, Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, had not been the most active chair in fundraising at a time when President Barack Obama’s neglect had left the party in significant debt. As Hillary’s campaign gained momentum, she resolved the party’s debt and put it on a starvation diet. It had become dependent on her campaign for survival, for which she expected to wield control of its operations.

Debbie was not a good manager. She hadn’t been very interested in controlling the party—she let Clinton’s headquarters in Brooklyn do as it desired so she didn’t have to inform the party officers how bad the situation was. How much control Brooklyn had and for how long was still something I had been trying to uncover for the last few weeks.

By September 7, the day I called Bernie, I had found my proof and it broke my heart.
 

El Gato Bandito

that log had a child
Jan 5, 2009
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#2
This isn't exactly ground breaking news. Everyone knows DWS screwed everything up, hence why she was forced to resign her position.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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Edmond
#3
Maybe not but Brazille, definitely did fill in the gaps of Clinton control. Now its out for public consumption. This is way different coming from a Dem.
 

Donnyboy

Lettin' the high times carry the low....
A/V Subscriber
Oct 31, 2005
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#5
How is that not illegal? And the massive sums of money the Obama campaigns raised where did they go if they weren't paying off DNC debt?
 

Lab Rat

Hold on while I make a chart
Jan 5, 2012
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#7
https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/11/02/clinton-brazile-hacks-2016-215774

Its a long article heres an excerpt

I had promised Bernie when I took the helm of the Democratic National Committee after the convention that I would get to the bottom of whether Hillary Clinton’s team had rigged the nomination process, as a cache of emails stolen by Russian hackers and posted online had suggested. I’d had my suspicions from the moment I walked in the door of the DNC a month or so earlier, based on the leaked emails. But who knew if some of them might have been forged? I needed to have solid proof, and so did Bernie.


So I followed the money. My predecessor, Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, had not been the most active chair in fundraising at a time when President Barack Obama’s neglect had left the party in significant debt. As Hillary’s campaign gained momentum, she resolved the party’s debt and put it on a starvation diet. It had become dependent on her campaign for survival, for which she expected to wield control of its operations.

Debbie was not a good manager. She hadn’t been very interested in controlling the party—she let Clinton’s headquarters in Brooklyn do as it desired so she didn’t have to inform the party officers how bad the situation was. How much control Brooklyn had and for how long was still something I had been trying to uncover for the last few weeks.

By September 7, the day I called Bernie, I had found my proof and it broke my heart.
I'm a registered Democrat, in the same way that Will Rogers was when he said, I'm not a member of any organized political party... I'm a Democrat. Hence, I acknowledge the severe dysfunction and incompetence the party has experienced over the past several years.

That doesn't mean that I support Bernie, as I believe that Bernie is too narrow-minded and far-left to adequately represent the entire party or lead the country. This recent op-ed from liberal WaPo columnist Dana Milbank titled Democrats are setting themselves up to lose points out many of the errors of the party and its leaders, including Bernie. The article stated this quote from John Kasich's advisor John Weaver, “They can have the left and the center, but for some reason the leadership of the DNC doesn’t want that,” and that's essentially how I feel about Bernie.

Another interesting op-ed this week from the New Yorker titled
The Democratic Civil War Is Getting Nasty, Even if No One Is Paying Attention reflects on the huge strategic mistakes of Hillary's team and how the Democratic Party leadership has essentially been AWOL.

I don't know how or when the DNC will get its stuff together, but I don't have faith that Tom Perez can do it. And while I like some of the names being floated for a 2020 presidential run (like Joe Biden), it seems that all of the potential candidates are former or current US Senators (Biden, Bernie Sanders, Tim Kaine, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, Sherrod Brown, Kirsten Gillibrand, Chris Murphy, etc.). The Democrats have a habit of nominating senators for president and VP. The last Democratic presidential nominee who wasn't a senator was Bill Clinton. The last Democratic vice presidential nominee who wasn't a senator was Geraldine Ferraro in 1984. While senators often have the qualifications to be president or VP, they will be viewed as political insiders by today's voters. For the Democrats to have a chance in 2020, they've got to choose a candidate that can connect with independent voters, and I'm not sure that any current senators (from either party) will be able to do that.
 

jakeman

Unhinged Idiot
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Apr 4, 2005
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Limbo
#11
I'm a registered Democrat, in the same way that Will Rogers was when he said, I'm not a member of any organized political party... I'm a Democrat. Hence, I acknowledge the severe dysfunction and incompetence the party has experienced over the past several years.

That doesn't mean that I support Bernie, as I believe that Bernie is too narrow-minded and far-left to adequately represent the entire party or lead the country. This recent op-ed from liberal WaPo columnist Dana Milbank titled Democrats are setting themselves up to lose points out many of the errors of the party and its leaders, including Bernie. The article stated this quote from John Kasich's advisor John Weaver, “They can have the left and the center, but for some reason the leadership of the DNC doesn’t want that,” and that's essentially how I feel about Bernie.

Another interesting op-ed this week from the New Yorker titled
The Democratic Civil War Is Getting Nasty, Even if No One Is Paying Attention reflects on the huge strategic mistakes of Hillary's team and how the Democratic Party leadership has essentially been AWOL.

I don't know how or when the DNC will get its stuff together, but I don't have faith that Tom Perez can do it. And while I like some of the names being floated for a 2020 presidential run (like Joe Biden), it seems that all of the potential candidates are former or current US Senators (Biden, Bernie Sanders, Tim Kaine, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, Sherrod Brown, Kirsten Gillibrand, Chris Murphy, etc.). The Democrats have a habit of nominating senators for president and VP. The last Democratic presidential nominee who wasn't a senator was Bill Clinton. The last Democratic vice presidential nominee who wasn't a senator was Geraldine Ferraro in 1984. While senators often have the qualifications to be president or VP, they will be viewed as political insiders by today's voters. For the Democrats to have a chance in 2020, they've got to choose a candidate that can connect with independent voters, and I'm not sure that any current senators (from either party) will be able to do that.

The democrat's leaders don't want the center, because they despise anyone that doesn't march in lock step with their identity politics, and the center isn't going to do that. The center would rather elect a lunatic. Until they cast off the fringe far left I don't think they stand much of a chance in a national election.
 

Lab Rat

Hold on while I make a chart
Jan 5, 2012
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#12
The democrat's leaders don't want the center, because they despise anyone that doesn't march in lock step with their identity politics, and the center isn't going to do that. The center would rather elect a lunatic. Until they cast off the fringe far left I don't think they stand much of a chance in a national election.
I don't think that they need to cast off the far left, but they do need to embrace the center. Obviously the current DNC leadership hasn't been able to do this for a long time. Joe Biden might be able to, but I really don't know if anyone else can. Perhaps Michael Bloomberg or someone from outside the political realm. However, I don't think the Democrats would choose someone with zero experience in public service. They would at least choose someone who has held an unelected or appointed position (like Sally Yates, Preet Bharara, or retired Gen. John Allen).
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
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Tulsa, OK
#13
I don't think that they need to cast off the far left, but they do need to embrace the center. Obviously the current DNC leadership hasn't been able to do this for a long time. Joe Biden might be able to, but I really don't know if anyone else can. Perhaps Michael Bloomberg or someone from outside the political realm. However, I don't think the Democrats would choose someone with zero experience in public service. They would at least choose someone who has held an unelected or appointed position (like Sally Yates, Preet Bharara, or retired Gen. John Allen).
If the Dems had nominated Jim Webb this past election he may have wiped the floor with Trump but he couldn't get any traction at all in the primaries. He would make a good candidate in '20 but the DNC is going to have come back off the liberal ledge for that to happen, something they have shown zero desire or ability to do.
 

Lab Rat

Hold on while I make a chart
Jan 5, 2012
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#14
If the Dems had nominated Jim Webb this past election he may have wiped the floor with Trump but he couldn't get any traction at all in the primaries. He would make a good candidate in '20 but the DNC is going to have come back off the liberal ledge for that to happen, something they have shown zero desire or ability to do.
I liked Jim Webb and he would have been capable of reaching independents and undecideds in the general election. However, I agree with you that he had trouble exciting the base of the party and it cost him in the primaries. Obviously, that's a very difficult task. Trump was able to do it on the right in 2016, and Obama managed to do it on the left in 2008. The one (and only) thing they have in common is great charisma. I hate to say it, but I don't think that Jim Webb has that same level of charisma. It's a shame, too, because he could bring fresh ideas and a broader outreach to the Democratic party.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
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#15
So what we have here is one confirmed cheater pointing a finger at another cheater.

Maybe Brazile is now seeing all this under the table money from Russia flowing around and has figured out they bipassd here table.
 

Deere Poke

I'd rather be in the woods
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Feb 13, 2014
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#18
I don't think that they need to cast off the far left, but they do need to embrace the center. Obviously the current DNC leadership hasn't been able to do this for a long time. Joe Biden might be able to, but I really don't know if anyone else can. Perhaps Michael Bloomberg or someone from outside the political realm. However, I don't think the Democrats would choose someone with zero experience in public service. They would at least choose someone who has held an unelected or appointed position (like Sally Yates, Preet Bharara, or retired Gen. John Allen).
The mainstream party is the far left today. It took them almost a year to say something bad about antifa. For 11 months of that year they were cheering them on for rioting and burning down cities. When are the people in the middle in the democratic party going to see this and realize the rest of the centrist democrats have already jumped ship and joined the GOP. Where they can at least have a civilized debate to push forward their ideas.

Why do you think republicans can't get anything done? The modern Republican party is compromised of at least 3 parties trying to work together.
 

cowboyinexile

Have some class
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Jun 29, 2004
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#20
I liked Jim Webb and he would have been capable of reaching independents and undecideds in the general election. However, I agree with you that he had trouble exciting the base of the party and it cost him in the primaries. Obviously, that's a very difficult task. Trump was able to do it on the right in 2016, and Obama managed to do it on the left in 2008. The one (and only) thing they have in common is great charisma. I hate to say it, but I don't think that Jim Webb has that same level of charisma. It's a shame, too, because he could bring fresh ideas and a broader outreach to the Democratic party.
I like Webb. Initially I hoped he would get the nomination but when it became more of a coronation for Hillary it wasn't meant to be.

A problem with him and most of the potential democratic challengers are that they are old. Webb is 71. Biden is 74. Warren (born an Okie btw) is 68. Sanders is 76. Franken looks young at 66. The push from the left will be for new millennial voters. Regardless of ideology I don't see how some of these potential candidates will connect with someone who is 17 years old right now.

Personally I'd like to see how Kamala Harris would do. She is relatively new to Washington and seems to not be willing to deal with bullshit. Black woman from California will alienate the Trump crowd but honestly that type of voter is unlikely to vote for anyone with a D in front of their name.

If you look at the current list of governors the Democratic party is pretty bare. Hickenlooper doesn't excite me and beyond that it's what, Kasich switching parties? You could go back to the Senate and say Booker but the people who will reject Harris immediately will do the same for him.

It probably doesn't matter though. At this point in 2005 Obama was a state senator so in the next couple of years someone is likely to rise up.