Critical race theory in Idaho

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PF5

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Privileged...The Players' Tribune...Kyle Korver

Long, but good read...a few excerpts:

I still remember my reaction when I first heard what happened to Thabo. It was 2015, late in the season. Thabo and I were teammates on the Hawks, and we’d flown into New York late after a game in Atlanta. When I woke up the next morning, our team group text was going nuts. Details were still hazy, but guys were saying, Thabo hurt his leg? During an arrest ? Wait he spent the night in jail?! Everyone was pretty upset and confused.

Well, almost everyone. My response was….. different. I’m embarrassed to admit it.
....
Anyway — on the morning I found out that Thabo had been arrested, want to know what my first thought was? About my friend and teammate? My first thought was: What was Thabo doing out at a club on a back-to-back??

Yeah. Not, How’s he doing? Not, What happened during the arrest?? Not, Something seems off with this story. Nothing like that. Before I knew the full story, and before I’d even had the chance to talk to Thabo….. I sort of blamed Thabo.

I thought, Well, if I’d been in Thabo’s shoes, out at a club late at night, the police wouldn’t have arrested me. Not unless I was doing something wrong.

Cringe.

It’s not like it was a conscious thought. It was pure reflex — the first thing to pop into my head.

-------------------------------------------

There’s an elephant in the room that I’ve been thinking about a lot over these last few weeks. It’s the fact that, demographically, if we’re being honest: I have more in common with the fans in the crowd at your average NBA game than I have with the players on the court.

And after the events in Salt Lake City last month, and as we’ve been discussing them since, I’ve really started to recognize the role those demographics play in my privilege. It’s like — I may be Thabo’s friend, or Ekpe’s teammate, or Russ’s colleague; I may work with those guys. And I absolutely 100% stand with them.

But I look like the other guy.

And whether I like it or not? I’m beginning to understand how that means something.

What I’m realizing is, no matter how passionately I commit to being an ally, and no matter how unwavering my support is for NBA and WNBA players of color….. I’m still in this conversation from the privileged perspective of opting in to it. Which of course means that on the flip side, I could just as easily opt out of it. Every day, I’m given that choice — I’m granted that privilege — based on the color of my skin.

In other words, I can say every right thing in the world: I can voice my solidarity with Russ after what happened in Utah. I can evolve my position on what happened to Thabo in New York. I can be that weird dude in Get Out bragging about how he’d have voted for Obama a third term. I can condemn every racist heckler I’ve ever known.

But I can also fade into the crowd, and my face can blend in with the faces of those hecklers, any time I want.


-----------------------------------------------------

How can I — as a white man, part of this systemic problem — become part of the solution when it comes to racism in my workplace? In my community? In this country?

These are the questions that I’ve been asking myself lately.

And I don’t think I have all the answers yet — but here are the ones that are starting to ring the most true:

I have to continue to educate myself on the history of racism in America.

I have to listen. I’ll say it again, because it’s that important. I have to listen.


I have to support leaders who see racial justice as fundamental — as something that’s at the heart of nearly every major issue in our country today. And I have to support policies that do the same.

I have to do my best to recognize when to get out of the way — in order to amplify the voices of marginalized groups that so often get lost.

But maybe more than anything?

I know that, as a white man, I have to hold my fellow white men accountable.

We all have to hold each other accountable.

And we all have to be accountable — period. Not just for our own actions, but also for the ways that our inaction can create a “safe” space for toxic behavior.


----------------------------------------------------------

It’s about responsibility. It’s about understanding that when we’ve said the word “equality,” for generations, what we’ve really meant is equality for a certain group of people. It’s about understanding that when we’ve said the word “inequality,” for generations, what we’ve really meant is slavery, and its aftermath — which is still being felt to this day. It’s about understanding on a fundamental level that black people and white people, they still have it different in America. And that those differences come from an ugly history….. not some random divide.

And it’s about understanding that Black Lives Matter, and movements like it, matter, because — well, let’s face it: I probably would’ve been safe on the street that one night in New York. And Thabo wasn’t. And I was safe on the court that one night in Utah. And Russell wasn’t.

----------------------------------------

But in many ways the more dangerous form of racism isn’t that loud and stupid kind. It isn’t the kind that announces itself when it walks into the arena. It’s the quiet and subtle kind. The kind that almost hides itself in plain view. It’s the person who does and says all the “right” things in public: They’re perfectly friendly when they meet a person of color. They’re very polite. But in private? Well….. they sort of wish that everyone would stop making everything “about race” all the time.

----------------------------------------------

The fact that black Americans are more than five times as likely to be incarcerated as white Americans is wrong. The fact that black Americans are more than twice as likely to live in poverty as white Americans is wrong. The fact that black unemployment rates nationally are double that of overall unemployment rates is wrong. The fact that black imprisonment rates for drug charges are almost six times higher nationally than white imprisonment rates for drug charges is wrong. The fact that black Americans own approximately one-tenth of the wealth that white Americans own is wrong.

The fact that inequality is built so deeply into so many of our most trusted institutions is wrong.

And I believe it’s the responsibility of anyone on the privileged end of those inequalities to help make things right.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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https://twitter.com/i/status/1403417908567429121
@TheMonkey what did the woman say that you found funny or disagreeable? Lots of issues on this board that there are legitimate different perspectives. But certainly seems or at least I hope, her speech is something all good people. could agree.
 

PF5

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I'm fairly positive this is a cluster f&%k because nobody really knows what critical race theory is...I bet if you asked 100 politicians (or regular citizens) what it means, you would get 90 versions of it...
 

TheMonkey

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@TheMonkey what did the woman say that you found funny or disagreeable? Lots of issues on this board that there are legitimate different perspectives. But certainly seems or at least I hope, her speech is something all good people. could agree.
Mea culpa. I skimmed over that, saw the James Woods quote, and assumed he was being his usual hyperbolic self. She did a great job. I’ve posted critique of CRT. I need to understand it more, but I am not a fan of what I know so far. Thanks for giving me pause to reconsider.

I removed my “funny” reaction.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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I'm fairly positive this is a cluster f&%k because nobody really knows what critical race theory is...I bet if you asked 100 politicians (or regular citizens) what it means, you would get 90 versions of it...
I agree.
Whether or not what the woman was describing was CRT or not, the first hand account of what she witnessed is NOT something that should be taught in schools (and I hope most agree).
 

UrbanCowboy1

Some cowboys gots smarts real good like me.
Aug 8, 2006
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https://twitter.com/i/status/1403417908567429121
The thing I hate most about CRT isn't even that it teaches white children to hate themselves. It's that it teaches black children that no matter what they do, they'll never be good enough. If you support CRT YOU are the racist. YOU are the one that thinks children should be separated based on skin color. And YOU are the ones perpetuating racial stereotypes all while being a wolf in sheep's clothing to the black community.
 

UrbanCowboy1

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I'm fairly positive this is a cluster f&%k because nobody really knows what critical race theory is...I bet if you asked 100 politicians (or regular citizens) what it means, you would get 90 versions of it...
Simple: You can only exist in society (particularly American society) as either an oppressed or oppressor. If you are a part of the oppressor group, no action you can ever take is altruistic towards the oppressed unless it also benefits yourself.

It's simplistic and idiotic and the people that support it should have to preface every speech with "I'm only supporting this, not because I want to help oppressed people, but because I think it will help me more"... because that's what the theory they are supporting says about them. I'm willing to bet that disclaimer doesn't happen.

It's an idea that collapses in upon itself at the slightest inquiry. It can't stand any rigorous examination by its nature. "You are questioning CRT and are white? You are being an oppressor. You are questioning CRT and are black? You are only questioning because you've been influenced by your oppressor."
 

UrbanCowboy1

Some cowboys gots smarts real good like me.
Aug 8, 2006
3,691
1,895
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Phoenix, AZ
Privileged...The Players' Tribune...Kyle Korver

Long, but good read...a few excerpts:

I still remember my reaction when I first heard what happened to Thabo. It was 2015, late in the season. Thabo and I were teammates on the Hawks, and we’d flown into New York late after a game in Atlanta. When I woke up the next morning, our team group text was going nuts. Details were still hazy, but guys were saying, Thabo hurt his leg? During an arrest ? Wait he spent the night in jail?! Everyone was pretty upset and confused.

Well, almost everyone. My response was….. different. I’m embarrassed to admit it.
....
Anyway — on the morning I found out that Thabo had been arrested, want to know what my first thought was? About my friend and teammate? My first thought was: What was Thabo doing out at a club on a back-to-back??

Yeah. Not, How’s he doing? Not, What happened during the arrest?? Not, Something seems off with this story. Nothing like that. Before I knew the full story, and before I’d even had the chance to talk to Thabo….. I sort of blamed Thabo.

I thought, Well, if I’d been in Thabo’s shoes, out at a club late at night, the police wouldn’t have arrested me. Not unless I was doing something wrong.

Cringe.

It’s not like it was a conscious thought. It was pure reflex — the first thing to pop into my head.

-------------------------------------------

There’s an elephant in the room that I’ve been thinking about a lot over these last few weeks. It’s the fact that, demographically, if we’re being honest: I have more in common with the fans in the crowd at your average NBA game than I have with the players on the court.

And after the events in Salt Lake City last month, and as we’ve been discussing them since, I’ve really started to recognize the role those demographics play in my privilege. It’s like — I may be Thabo’s friend, or Ekpe’s teammate, or Russ’s colleague; I may work with those guys. And I absolutely 100% stand with them.

But I look like the other guy.

And whether I like it or not? I’m beginning to understand how that means something.

What I’m realizing is, no matter how passionately I commit to being an ally, and no matter how unwavering my support is for NBA and WNBA players of color….. I’m still in this conversation from the privileged perspective of opting in to it. Which of course means that on the flip side, I could just as easily opt out of it. Every day, I’m given that choice — I’m granted that privilege — based on the color of my skin.

In other words, I can say every right thing in the world: I can voice my solidarity with Russ after what happened in Utah. I can evolve my position on what happened to Thabo in New York. I can be that weird dude in Get Out bragging about how he’d have voted for Obama a third term. I can condemn every racist heckler I’ve ever known.

But I can also fade into the crowd, and my face can blend in with the faces of those hecklers, any time I want.

-----------------------------------------------------

How can I — as a white man, part of this systemic problem — become part of the solution when it comes to racism in my workplace? In my community? In this country?

These are the questions that I’ve been asking myself lately.

And I don’t think I have all the answers yet — but here are the ones that are starting to ring the most true:

I have to continue to educate myself on the history of racism in America.

I have to listen. I’ll say it again, because it’s that important. I have to listen.

I have to support leaders who see racial justice as fundamental — as something that’s at the heart of nearly every major issue in our country today. And I have to support policies that do the same.

I have to do my best to recognize when to get out of the way — in order to amplify the voices of marginalized groups that so often get lost.

But maybe more than anything?

I know that, as a white man, I have to hold my fellow white men accountable.

We all have to hold each other accountable.

And we all have to be accountable — period. Not just for our own actions, but also for the ways that our inaction can create a “safe” space for toxic behavior.

----------------------------------------------------------

It’s about responsibility. It’s about understanding that when we’ve said the word “equality,” for generations, what we’ve really meant is equality for a certain group of people. It’s about understanding that when we’ve said the word “inequality,” for generations, what we’ve really meant is slavery, and its aftermath — which is still being felt to this day. It’s about understanding on a fundamental level that black people and white people, they still have it different in America. And that those differences come from an ugly history….. not some random divide.

And it’s about understanding that Black Lives Matter, and movements like it, matter, because — well, let’s face it: I probably would’ve been safe on the street that one night in New York. And Thabo wasn’t. And I was safe on the court that one night in Utah. And Russell wasn’t.

----------------------------------------

But in many ways the more dangerous form of racism isn’t that loud and stupid kind. It isn’t the kind that announces itself when it walks into the arena. It’s the quiet and subtle kind. The kind that almost hides itself in plain view. It’s the person who does and says all the “right” things in public: They’re perfectly friendly when they meet a person of color. They’re very polite. But in private? Well….. they sort of wish that everyone would stop making everything “about race” all the time.

----------------------------------------------

The fact that black Americans are more than five times as likely to be incarcerated as white Americans is wrong. The fact that black Americans are more than twice as likely to live in poverty as white Americans is wrong. The fact that black unemployment rates nationally are double that of overall unemployment rates is wrong. The fact that black imprisonment rates for drug charges are almost six times higher nationally than white imprisonment rates for drug charges is wrong. The fact that black Americans own approximately one-tenth of the wealth that white Americans own is wrong.

The fact that inequality is built so deeply into so many of our most trusted institutions is wrong.

And I believe it’s the responsibility of anyone on the privileged end of those inequalities to help make things right.

I think this is complete bull. His first thought was the right one, and he would have naturally had it if it had been a white teammate: "What's he doing out at a club on a back-to-back?". The fact that Thabo was out shows that he cared more about having a good time than he did supporting his team to the best of his abilities the next day.

Not questioning this because your teammate is black is the height of racism. You are holding your black teammate to a lower standard because they are black. You don't think they are capable of making smart adult decisions because they have a different skin color than you do.

And to be clear, I'm not knocking going out and partying, and I'm not saying anything regarding Thabo getting arrested - we're talking about Kyle Korver's headspace and his desire to be seen "as an ally". This whole article is pure grandstanding.
 

PF5

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Jan 3, 2014
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I think this is complete bull. His first thought was the right one, and he would have naturally had it if it had been a white teammate: "What's he doing out at a club on a back-to-back?". The fact that Thabo was out shows that he cared more about having a good time than he did supporting his team to the best of his abilities the next day.

Not questioning this because your teammate is black is the height of racism. You are holding your black teammate to a lower standard because they are black. You don't think they are capable of making smart adult decisions because they have a different skin color than you do.

And to be clear, I'm not knocking going out and partying, and I'm not saying anything regarding Thabo getting arrested - we're talking about Kyle Korver's headspace and his desire to be seen "as an ally". This whole article is pure grandstanding.
you have a different mindset than I do...it's not the fact that Thabo was out late, it's the fact Kyle didn't think about Thabo first, he thought about 'surely he did something to deserve this vs. why did they break his leg during arrest...and you think Korver wrote this to grandstand? ok, whatever...grandstanding what? that he admits to somewhat racists thoughts early or at least not getting the whole story and then regretting it later? a white guy can't stand up and defend his black teammates and be sincere? I think that way of thinking is complete bull.
 
Last edited:
Jan 3, 2014
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https://twitter.com/i/status/1405626871199375362
whether you believe in CRT or not, this is a poor example of why it's not present...this is one example out of millions...saw a similar thing on social media that showed a black man with tattoos saying he was pulled over, he's black, he has tattoos, etc, and he complied and nothing happened to him...so this means there is not racial profiling or police brutality because of one dudes example?....
 
Mar 11, 2006
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whether you believe in CRT or not, this is a poor example of why it's not present...this is one example out of millions...saw a similar thing on social media that showed a black man with tattoos saying he was pulled over, he's black, he has tattoos, etc, and he complied and nothing happened to him...so this means there is not racial profiling or police brutality because of one dudes example?....
Sounds like he provided an excellent example as to how hard work, and certainly luck and good timing, can result in success. The fact that he did this without parental support is impressive.
 

TheMonkey

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Heaven forbid people interpret the world through their own, unique experiences instead of trying to align with the tribe of their choice to destroy the enemy tribe. Amiright?
Apparently, those are the only choices available. Amiright?

I am not a fan of Critical Race Theory, but the existence of successful black people is not proof oppression does not exist.
 

Birry

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Apparently, those are the only choices available. Amiright?

I am not a fan of Critical Race Theory, but the existence of successful black people is not proof oppression does not exist.
Seems like you don't understand what CRT is, then. CRT states that oppression is inherent in all cases where majorities or powers exist. He's basically saying that if that's true, then he couldn't have succeeded due to his supposed impossible disadvantages. He's not directly challenging the practical expressions of systemic racism, etc....(which are real) He's challenging the theory, itself, to show that it's not the absolute, factual law that some people have started to believe.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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Seems like you don't understand what CRT is, then. CRT states that oppression is inherent in all cases where majorities or powers exist. He's basically saying that if that's true, then he couldn't have succeeded due to his supposed impossible disadvantages. He's not directly challenging the practical expressions of systemic racism, etc....(which are real) He's challenging the theory, itself, to show that it's not the absolute, factual law that some people have started to believe.
Although I fully admit I have not spent enough time reading through CRT to make an absolute statement, I agree.

I started this thread about Idaho bill. The bill stated that it would "would prohibit public schools from teaching that "any sex, race, ethnicity, religion, color, or national origin is inherently superior or inferior”. And "bans teachings that argue that people should be treated differently based on things like race or gender”

That makes sense to me. And if CRT is truly pushing to teach that --- I agree CRT should be stopped.