Covid-19

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StillwaterTownie

Federal Marshal
Jun 18, 2010
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Frist off, they are a tiny minority and do you even know if everyone at that conference didn't get the vaccine...Btw, it's time to burn mask if we ALL get the vaccine...I'm sure that wasn't the point, but it is the truth.
Btw, every Republican leader that I can think of has not only gotten the vaccine, but they have also pretty much said it was a good thing....here's our local leaders.
Oklahoma Senators Inhofe, Lankford get COVID vaccinations | KOKH (okcfox.com)
'It's Consistent With Scripture': Franklin Graham Urges Christians to Take the COVID-19 Vaccine - Beliefnet News
Most Christians welcome the COVID-19 vaccines, but some are skeptical | The Christian Chronicle

Bottom line you continue to attempt to paint a false narrative picture that it's only Republicans or Christians who don't want the vaccine when the truth is that its a minority of them just as it is in other groups who have problems with taking vaccines. Christians all over the country are getting the vaccine, churches are hosting vaccination sites, and leaders are stepping out to advocate for them among other Christians. Yet you want to point out the negative rather than helping to convince them to get them.
Meanwhile
Donald Trump and wife got their shots
Mike Pence and wife same
Nearly every Republican member of congress and senate got theirs
Governor Stitt got his
Mayor Bynum got his
Most, if not all, of our Tulsa City Council got theirs
I don't believe that Gary Null is a Republican. He votes Independent for president. I don't know if he's a Christian.

41% of Republicans polled saying they're not getting vaccinated for COVID-19 is too much to be a tiny minority. A CBS News poll put it at 34%.

The CDC does not advise it's a good time to burn your mask for all circumstances, if fully vaccinated against COVID-19.
  • You can gather indoors with fully vaccinated people without wearing a mask or staying 6 feet apart.
  • You can gather indoors with unvaccinated people of any age from one other household (for example, visiting with relatives who all live together) without masks or staying 6 feet apart, unless any of those people or anyone they live with has an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
 
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Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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I don't believe that Gary Null is a Republican. He votes Independent for president. I don't know if he's a Christian.

41% of Republicans polled saying they're not getting vaccinated for COVID-19 is too much to be a tiny minority. A CBS News poll put it at 34%.

The CDC does not advise it's a good time to burn your mask for all circumstances, if fully vaccinated against COVID-19.
  • You can gather indoors with fully vaccinated people without wearing a mask or staying 6 feet apart.
  • You can gather indoors with unvaccinated people of any age from one other household (for example, visiting with relatives who all live together) without masks or staying 6 feet apart, unless any of those people or anyone they live with has an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
That 41% seems really high especially since basically all of the party leadership has taken the jabs. When was the poll conducted? I’d be wary of polls that attempt to paint a one sided Political picture. Here’s something to think about...50% of Oklahomans over 18 have taken at least one dose...how did we vote in the last several elections? If 41% of us weren’t taking the jab that 50% adult voting age participation number would be MUCH lower. Bottom line, you are spreading a false narrative.
 
May 4, 2011
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Charleston, SC
That 41% seems really high especially since basically all of the party leadership has taken the jabs. When was the poll conducted? I’d be wary of polls that attempt to paint a one sided Political picture. Here’s something to think about...50% of Oklahomans over 18 have taken at least one dose...how did we vote in the last several elections? If 41% of us weren’t taking the jab that 50% adult voting age participation number would be MUCH lower. Bottom line, you are spreading a false narrative.
Not weighing in on the rest of this, but it's a pretty repeated finding that about 40% of Republicans say they won't or probably won't get vaccinated. Also, even if 100% of Oklahomans were Republicans, that means youd expect 60% of adults to get vaccinated. Based on the slowdown we've seen in vaccine uptake, that's looking close to right.
 

StillwaterTownie

Federal Marshal
Jun 18, 2010
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That 41% seems really high especially since basically all of the party leadership has taken the jabs. When was the poll conducted? I’d be wary of polls that attempt to paint a one sided Political picture. Here’s something to think about...50% of Oklahomans over 18 have taken at least one dose...how did we vote in the last several elections? If 41% of us weren’t taking the jab that 50% adult voting age participation number would be MUCH lower. Bottom line, you are spreading a false narrative.
NO, I'm not spreading a false narrative. Instead, you should be expressing happiness that LIBERAL CBS in its poll found only 34% of Republicans indicated that they weren't getting vaccinated against COVID-19.
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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Not weighing in on the rest of this, but it's a pretty repeated finding that about 40% of Republicans say they won't or probably won't get vaccinated. Also, even if 100% of Oklahomans were Republicans, that means youd expect 60% of adults to get vaccinated. Based on the slowdown we've seen in vaccine uptake, that's looking close to right.
Yes, some Republicans are among those numbers but stories that say it's 34 to 41% of them that won't take it is high and discounts all the others (native Americans, Blacks, Hispanics, others) who, sadly, won't yet take it in as large numbers as we want, either...because...that doesn't fit the narrative the pollsters are wanting to push in their stories (i.e. "Dude, look how stupid Republicans are"). Bottom line, it's a percentage of people of all walks of life that don't want to take the vaccine, but some on the left have a massive agenda against those in the Republican party and anyone associated with their enemy #1 former POTUS Trump...so much so that they are willing to skew every poll and talking point against one demographic while ignoring all the others. That massive bias skews the number and is just not a scientific nor remotely accurate way to study things. Btw, percentages of populations below a certain age is starting to show up as a bigger issue than is racial or political demographics. We need to do our part in convincing our teen and young adults to get the vaccine in order to end the spread of variants and the virus in general. Once these demographic vaccine rates match the older ones we should have herd immunity.

On a positive note, I'm learning that in my big church that I have been worried about in terms of vaccine rates, the vaccines are starting to be advised for those wanting to go on mission trips. We have some scheduled for this summer and it's being advised. We are seeing numbers in all demographics step up as people realize that it's the safe and prudent thing to do.
 
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Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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I imagine there will still be reluctance to get the J&J if the other two are available.
I think India will take it in droves with what is going on right now over there...if we won't take this safe vaccine then I say we ship it to India in mass to save lives.

Bottom line, if we do our part by getting the vaccine and convincing others to do the same we can get this thing OVER in country...Internationally is going to take a global vaccine effort of epic proportions...which is underway.
 
May 4, 2011
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Yes, some Republicans are among those numbers but stories that say it's 34 to 41% of them that won't take it is high and discounts all the others (native Americans, Blacks, Hispanics, others) who, sadly, won't yet take it in as large numbers as we want, either...because...that doesn't fit the narrative the pollsters are wanting to push in their stories (i.e. "Dude, look how stupid Republicans are"). Bottom line, it's a percentage of people of all walks of life that don't want to take the vaccine, but some on the left have a massive agenda against those in the Republican party and anyone associated with their enemy #1 former POTUS Trump...so much so that they are willing to skew every poll and talking point against one demographic while ignoring all the others. That massive bias skews the number and is just not a scientific nor remotely accurate way to study things.

On a positive note, I'm learning that in my big church that I have been worried about in terms of vaccine rates, the vaccines are starting to be advised for those wanting to go on mission trips. We have some scheduled for this summer and it's being advised. We are seeing numbers in all demographics step up as people realize that it's the safe and prudent thing to do.
A few things here. First, I explicitly said I'm not weighing in on other things and did not mention race/ethnicity. I was clearly responding only to what seemed like your statements that 40% of Republicans aren't vaccine hesitant or resistant. Effects of republican vaccine hesitancy are already showing up in maps of vaccine uptake.

Screenshot_20210424-082757_Chrome.jpg


The second thing is your statement comes across as conflating being a Republican with being White. I'm guessing/hoping that's not what you meant, but obviously there are non-White Republicans, especially in Oklahoma where there are substantial proportions of Native people (and others) who are Republican. Your statement also comes across as trying to deflect from Republican hesitancy as though somehow they cancel each other out or justify one another. Both are issues and both get a fair amount of attention from every public health group I work with.

If we're going to talk about race/ethnicity, hesitancy has consistently dropped among Latinos. We still have some elevated rates among Native and Black populations, though. At present, lower vaccine uptake among Latinos has a lot more to do with barriers to access, but even that is changing. This is an area of expertise for me and part of what I do for a living.
 

Rack

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Oct 13, 2004
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We have passed the 1 BILLION shots given milestone worldwide...need to step it up on shots per day worldwide to really wipe this thing out. Single shot doses needed badly in the developing world.

The USA passed 226 MILLION doses and we need to continue to encourage those who are hesitant as well as our 16 and up youth to get this shot in order to complete starve out the virus.
41.6% of us have received one shot or more...we need to push this number over 50% in order to be getting closer to herd immunity and an end to mass spread. This according to all the virologist who say we need 75% coverage for true herd immunity. Hopefully that's them aiming high.
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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A few things here. First, I explicitly said I'm not weighing in on other things and did not mention race/ethnicity. I was clearly responding only to what seemed like your statements that 40% of Republicans aren't vaccine hesitant or resistant. Effects of republican vaccine hesitancy are already showing up in maps of vaccine uptake.

View attachment 89917

The second thing is your statement comes across as conflating being a Republican with being White. I'm guessing/hoping that's not what you meant, but obviously there are non-White Republicans, especially in Oklahoma where there are substantial proportions of Native people (and others) who are Republican. Your statement also comes across as trying to deflect from Republican hesitancy as though somehow they cancel each other out or justify one another. Both are issues and both get a fair amount of attention from every public health group I work with.

If we're going to talk about race/ethnicity, hesitancy has consistently dropped among Latinos. We still have some elevated rates among Native and Black populations, though. At present, lower vaccine uptake among Latinos has a lot more to do with barriers to access, but even that is changing. This is an area of expertise for me and part of what I do for a living.
You are making a similar point that I am in a different way. My point is that attempts to single out one group while completely ignoring others as hesitant is not going to get those we all want to get the vaccine to get it. That practice only furthers the political divide. Folks like @StillwaterTownie seem to be determined to see it in a "black and white" way when it's a "grey" area that deserves our love and attention when dealing with hesitancy across all demographics. Building disdain for one group or another is counter productive for this cause. That is my point.