Covid-19

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Sep 12, 2008
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My brother has gotten his hospital bill from his wife's hospitalization. He has good insurance, so this isn't what he's going to have to pay, but his total hospital bill is over $800k. That doesn't include things like physician bills, radiology, etc. Her total expenditure could be well over $1 million. And she died.

For those of you who are "the cure can't be worse than the disease", how many $1 million hospital bill could we afford before the economy collapses?
I am very sorry for your brothers loss.

COVID is the gift that keeps on giving. We will be feeling the impact and ramifications for many years to come.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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Boulder, CO
My brother has gotten his hospital bill from his wife's hospitalization. He has good insurance, so this isn't what he's going to have to pay, but his total hospital bill is over $800k. That doesn't include things like physician bills, radiology, etc. Her total expenditure could be well over $1 million. And she died.

For those of you who are "the cure can't be worse than the disease", how many $1 million hospital bill could we afford before the economy collapses?
I had a guy trimming trees for me a few years back who fell from about 40 feet up. Fractured his pelvis, severed his femoral artery, & multiple other injuries. Was LifeFlighted to OUMC & spent over a month there. Zero insurance, bill of over half a million.

Have homeless people regularly at our hospital that rack up hundreds of thousands in bills.

Don't even get me started on all of the people who have SoonerCare, but can't make it to the free clinic that's open 12 hours a day, so they come to the ER @ 2am on a Sunday for the 'cough' they've had for days.

It happens.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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Nov 8, 2004
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I had a guy trimming trees for me a few years back who fell from about 40 feet up. Fractured his pelvis, severed his femoral artery, & multiple other injuries. Was LifeFlighted to OUMC & spent over a month there. Zero insurance, bill of over half a million.

Have homeless people regularly at our hospital that rack up hundreds of thousands in bills.

Don't even get me started on all of the people who have SoonerCare, but can't make it to the free clinic that's open 12 hours a day, so they come to the ER @ 2am on a Sunday for the 'cough' they've had for days.

It happens.
You didn't even begin to address my question. Those are non-answers. We still have the random guy falling off the ladder, we still have the people on SoonerCare, we still have homeless people. But now we also have COVID-19 being the leading cause of death in the United States for 2020, and people staying on mechanical ventilators for weeks and racking up huge hospital bills (some of which also don't have insurance). So, Mr. "cure worse than the disease", if we doubled the number of people who contracted the disease since March without any kind of social distancing or other mitigation, how long would the system last without collapsing?
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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Wishing I was in Stillwater
https://www.denverpost.com/2021/01/19/colorado-convention-center-denver-coronavirus-decommission/

“The state’s hospital capacity is expected to meet the healthcare needs of COVID-19 as shown by modeling data and information from hospital partners,” the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management announced on Twitter
Again, this doesn't address the question I asked.
https://www.denverpost.com/2020/04/08/colorado-coronavirus-covid-timeline/
 
Feb 11, 2007
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Oklahoma City
My brother has gotten his hospital bill from his wife's hospitalization. He has good insurance, so this isn't what he's going to have to pay, but his total hospital bill is over $800k. That doesn't include things like physician bills, radiology, etc. Her total expenditure could be well over $1 million. And she died.

For those of you who are "the cure can't be worse than the disease", how many $1 million hospital bill could we afford before the economy collapses?
Remember what Nancy Pelosi said about the 400 page Obamacare bill: "We have to pass it to see what is in it".
 
Jul 25, 2018
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Boulder, CO
You didn't even begin to address my question. Those are non-answers. We still have the random guy falling off the ladder, we still have the people on SoonerCare, we still have homeless people. But now we also have COVID-19 being the leading cause of death in the United States for 2020, and people staying on mechanical ventilators for weeks and racking up huge hospital bills (some of which also don't have insurance). So, Mr. "cure worse than the disease", if we doubled the number of people who contracted the disease since March without any kind of social distancing or other mitigation, how long would the system last without collapsing?[/QUOTE]

You're right, those bills that are being racked up daily, pre & post COVID have nothing to do with this.

Last I knew, we have mitigation measures in place, so the bolded part makes zero sense.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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Boulder, CO
Jul 25, 2018
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/mar...ir-in-the-uk-heres-why/ar-BB1cXOR3?ocid=ientp

A battle has broken out in the U.K. over the use of rapid coronavirus tests — known formally as "lateral flow tests."

A heated debate is taking place over just how accurate they are at detecting Covid-19 cases, and whether they should be rolled out as a cheaper and faster way to carry out mass testing.
The tests can be self-administered and detect current Covid-19 infection, with results usually within 30 minutes. They involve taking a swab from both nostrils, but not the throat, and can be processed without laboratory equipment

But the tests have divided the scientific community, with critics saying that the tests are less accurate than PCR tests, which are still widely seen as the "gold standard" in terms of sensitivity and accuracy (although the results tend to take longer than 24 hours), and could lead to multiple false negative results

The study also confirmed that the more virus detected in the nose and throat (known as the viral load), the more infectious the individual is: "This is the first time this has been confirmed in a large-scale study and explains part of why some people pass Covid-19 on and others do not," the study noted.

As such, people with higher viral loads are more likely to pass the infection on to others, making these infected individuals the most important to detect, so they can be isolated in order to reduce onward transmission.

The wider use of lateral flow tests could help pick up more of these highly infectious individuals that transmit the virus more easily, the study said.

"Modelling suggests that lateral flow devices would identify individuals responsible for 84% of transmissions using the least sensitive of four (lateral flow) kits tested, and 91% using the most sensitive," the study said, although it recognized that such tests are less accurate than PCR tests.

"Covid-19 tests that are less sensitive than the standard PCR but, easier to make widely available, such as lateral flow tests, could be a good solution to ensuring those who are highly infectious are able to know they need to isolate more quickly and could allow an easing of lockdown restrictions."

"They would also allow more people to be tested yielding immediate results, including those who do not have symptoms and people at increased risk of testing positive, for example, because of their work or having been a contact themselves."
 

Rack

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Oct 13, 2004
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Vaccine update:

Worldwide over 54.5 million doses have been administered
US 16,525,281 vaccines administered
Oklahoma 251,684 vaccines administered (6,361 doses given per 100K people
) Top 10 state. ;-)
California now leads the way in number of shots administered with Texas running second both around 1.5 million shots given each...Florida just behind them with 1.2 million shots given. New York has now given over a million shots as well.

All good news.

Starting to get a little traction on vaccines...Hope this steps up as new POTUS promises it will.

May God help us end this curse on the nation and the world!
 
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Jul 25, 2018
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https://tulsaworld.com/news/state-a...86c2733.html#tracking-source=home-top-story-1

klahoma’s COVID-19 surge might finally have peaked, or perhaps it could be entering a plateau phase.
What happens next, though, still isn’t certain. Dr. Jennifer Clark said the more contagious COVID-19 variant confirmed in at least 20 states so far presents an unknown variable.

Clark said cases across the globe and U.S. appear to be trending downward, or at least plateauing. In Oklahoma, COVID-19 hospitalizations have stabilized. The rate isn’t sustainable long-term, she said, but they are at a more manageable level of late.

So has COVID’s worst surge in Oklahoma hit its peak?

“It’s hard to say. I’m not willing to bet my children’s life on it yet that we have peaked and are coming down,” Clark told her Zoom audience Wednesday during her weekly Project ECHO session on COVID data. “But things have definitely slowed down.”
 
May 4, 2011
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Charleston, SC
https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/mar...ir-in-the-uk-heres-why/ar-BB1cXOR3?ocid=ientp

A battle has broken out in the U.K. over the use of rapid coronavirus tests — known formally as "lateral flow tests."

A heated debate is taking place over just how accurate they are at detecting Covid-19 cases, and whether they should be rolled out as a cheaper and faster way to carry out mass testing.
The tests can be self-administered and detect current Covid-19 infection, with results usually within 30 minutes. They involve taking a swab from both nostrils, but not the throat, and can be processed without laboratory equipment

But the tests have divided the scientific community, with critics saying that the tests are less accurate than PCR tests, which are still widely seen as the "gold standard" in terms of sensitivity and accuracy (although the results tend to take longer than 24 hours), and could lead to multiple false negative results

The study also confirmed that the more virus detected in the nose and throat (known as the viral load), the more infectious the individual is: "This is the first time this has been confirmed in a large-scale study and explains part of why some people pass Covid-19 on and others do not," the study noted.

As such, people with higher viral loads are more likely to pass the infection on to others, making these infected individuals the most important to detect, so they can be isolated in order to reduce onward transmission.

The wider use of lateral flow tests could help pick up more of these highly infectious individuals that transmit the virus more easily, the study said.

"Modelling suggests that lateral flow devices would identify individuals responsible for 84% of transmissions using the least sensitive of four (lateral flow) kits tested, and 91% using the most sensitive," the study said, although it recognized that such tests are less accurate than PCR tests.

"Covid-19 tests that are less sensitive than the standard PCR but, easier to make widely available, such as lateral flow tests, could be a good solution to ensuring those who are highly infectious are able to know they need to isolate more quickly and could allow an easing of lockdown restrictions."

"They would also allow more people to be tested yielding immediate results, including those who do not have symptoms and people at increased risk of testing positive, for example, because of their work or having been a contact themselves."
Related to this, I don't see how modeling doesn't support the expansion of testing through these devices. Would you use it in the ICU? No, but that's not the point of this kind of expansion. It's to make testing easier, literally less painful, and more accessible so that you massively expand who gets tested. You'd only need this to expand testing by about 25% in order for this kind of testing to make a significant improvement in how many cases you're catching. Another thing is this kind of testing could be used in settings where getting a test is actually an incentive, especially leisure. What incentive does the asymptomatic person currently have for getting randomly tested periodically? If work or school requires it or of you're around at risk people, but from a behavioral science perspective, it's all negative reinforcement (i.e., when you are reinforced by taking away something bad). Testing in those settings may actually be a punishment because then I get sent home and/or my kid does. If they don't have to get tested, why would they? I don't know how much social responsibility can be sustained for something like that especially when people are going to get repeated negative tests. I say this as someone who has been tested 7 times and I still have more to go, but if I'm feeling exhausted by it, then there's a not small group that's avoiding it altogether.

Implement something like this with a same-day test before being able to go to bars, restaurants, entertainment, etc. and you now have a population that wants to get tested regularly and investing in options like this could make that feasible.
 
May 4, 2011
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Charleston, SC
https://tulsaworld.com/news/state-a...86c2733.html#tracking-source=home-top-story-1

klahoma’s COVID-19 surge might finally have peaked, or perhaps it could be entering a plateau phase.
What happens next, though, still isn’t certain. Dr. Jennifer Clark said the more contagious COVID-19 variant confirmed in at least 20 states so far presents an unknown variable.

Clark said cases across the globe and U.S. appear to be trending downward, or at least plateauing. In Oklahoma, COVID-19 hospitalizations have stabilized. The rate isn’t sustainable long-term, she said, but they are at a more manageable level of late.

So has COVID’s worst surge in Oklahoma hit its peak?

“It’s hard to say. I’m not willing to bet my children’s life on it yet that we have peaked and are coming down,” Clark told her Zoom audience Wednesday during her weekly Project ECHO session on COVID data. “But things have definitely slowed down.”
Nationwide declines have definitely started. How long they will be sustained and when/if we plateau or rise again is anyone's guess.

Screenshot_20210121-120256_Chrome.jpg
Screenshot_20210121-120239_Chrome.jpg
 
Jul 25, 2018
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Boulder, CO
Nationwide declines have definitely started. How long they will be sustained and when/if we plateau or rise again is anyone's guess.

View attachment 88496 View attachment 88497
I'm cautiously optimistic that Biden's plan for 100 million doses in 100 days can happen.

Still don't understand the lack of straight answers coming out about the stockpile. Pfizer now says they do have one. ????
 
May 4, 2011
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Charleston, SC
I'm cautiously optimistic that Biden's plan for 100 million doses in 100 days can happen.

Still don't understand the lack of straight answers coming out about the stockpile. Pfizer now says they do have one. ????
Don't the feds store them after getting them from pfizer and Moderna? If so, it easily could be that things went so slowly that the feds stopped storing them and Pfizer has extra doses. It seems like doses are only part of the problem and the logistics have been a much bigger problem. We averaged 900k doses over the last week. Getting to 1mil is in sight.
 

Rack

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Don't the feds store them after getting them from pfizer and Moderna? If so, it easily could be that things went so slowly that the feds stopped storing them and Pfizer has extra doses. It seems like doses are only part of the problem and the logistics have been a much bigger problem. We averaged 900k doses over the last week. Getting to 1mil is in sight.
In what state are you taking about when you say “we?” Do you mean one million a week nationally? Obviously we want to get that to daily sooner rather than later. Thanks for the info
 
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May 4, 2011
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Charleston, SC
In what state are you taking about when you say “we?” Do you mean one million a week nationally? Obviously we want to get that to daily sooner rather than later.
Yes, nationally. Biden's goal is 100 million doses in 100 days, as the previous poster referenced, ergo 1 million per day.

Edit: spotting some confusion in the last post, over the last week we have averaged 900k doses PER DAY.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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Boulder, CO
Don't the feds store them after getting them from pfizer and Moderna? If so, it easily could be that things went so slowly that the feds stopped storing them and Pfizer has extra doses. It seems like doses are only part of the problem and the logistics have been a much bigger problem. We averaged 900k doses over the last week. Getting to 1mil is in sight.
I don't know the specifics of the distribution chain. I know our facility has a bunch of the coolers & is used as a regional distributor of both vaccines.

It appears that claims of no stockpile are false, according to Pfizer. Seems to be politics & semantics at play here.

"Vaccine maker Pfizer says it has second doses of coronavirus vaccines ready to ship as needed – something that should reassure governors infuriated by the federal government’s announcement that it does not have a reserve stockpile of vaccine doses.
Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said Friday there was no reserve stockpile, even though the Trump administration has been telling states for weeks it is holding onto second doses of vaccine to make sure people who get one dose can get the second shot on time.
Pfizer says it’s holding the vaccine doses.
“Operation Warp Speed (OWS) has asked us to start shipping second doses only recently. As a result, we have on hand all the second doses of the previous shipments to the US. We are working around the clock to produce millions more each day,” Pfizer said in a statement sent to CNN.​
 

Binman4OSU

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Stupid about AGW!!
I don't know the specifics of the distribution chain. I know our facility has a bunch of the coolers & is used as a regional distributor of both vaccines.

It appears that claims of no stockpile are false, according to Pfizer. Seems to be politics & semantics at play here.

"Vaccine maker Pfizer says it has second doses of coronavirus vaccines ready to ship as needed – something that should reassure governors infuriated by the federal government’s announcement that it does not have a reserve stockpile of vaccine doses.
Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said Friday there was no reserve stockpile, even though the Trump administration has been telling states for weeks it is holding onto second doses of vaccine to make sure people who get one dose can get the second shot on time.
Pfizer says it’s holding the vaccine doses.
“Operation Warp Speed (OWS) has asked us to start shipping second doses only recently. As a result, we have on hand all the second doses of the previous shipments to the US. We are working around the clock to produce millions more each day,” Pfizer said in a statement sent to CNN.​
NY canceled 23K appointments for COVID vaccines today because they are out of shots to give


►Britain's National Health Service is preparing at least two London buses to serve as makeshift ambulances so four COVID patients can be transported at once, The Guardian reports. The buses, to be staffed by intensive car physicians and nurses, are designed to ease the strain the pandemic has put on London ambulance services.