Covid-19

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steross

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California just released a new report (July 12th) on cases and deaths from COVID. Of the ~9M youths under 18 years old , there have been ZERO deaths. Repeat ZERO deaths out of 27k cases for youths under 18.

Total deaths in the state is 7.1k. Only 450 of those below 50 years old. 77% of deaths are over 65 years of age. With 56% of total being over 75.

Other interesting stats:
1) The age group with highest percentage of cases is 18-34 year olds. 115k of the 337k statewide cases are in that group (35%). Yet only 83 deaths.

2) 47% of California is under 35 years old. Yet only 83 deaths.

This data matches New York data. This data matches UK data. Why, why, why would we close schools???

It seems like both sides are ignoring science. On one side we have the tin-foil hat group that thinks COVID is a myth and on the other side we have the fear-mongerers who treat this like everyone is an 85 year old invalid.
Sort of like if inner city gangs went to the suburbs and shot older people instead of each other so we listed the death rates of inner city gang members and said, “Gee, this isn’t such a big deal.”
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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Remind me again how deadly this is for someone in their 50's.
Keep trying to fit that sofa into your Prius, Mr. Man Bun.

Not knowing anything about his son's age or health and making the comments you have only make you an ass. So, just stop. What will you say now if his son dies?

There is every reason to be concerned about COVID-19 morbidity and mortality in a 50 year old.

COVID-19 deaths by age group.

1594895152007.png
 

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
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He seems to be a very health man, I’m hoping he’s ok...a very good person. I’m sure he will recover nicely. Wonder if he got it from his kids baseball games?
He has destroyed a lot of good people nearing the end of their careers at many state agencies firing them just prior to retirement without cause. Including a family member of mine so I have first hand knowledge. He just did the same to my family member. BTW, he replaced her with TWO friends and is paying them more so other than scamming people out of the retirement they earned it is political paybacks not money saving. Not to mention the people have no clue how to do the jobs. He is FAR from a good person. He is what anyone without blinders on knew from the illegal way he ran his businesses, he is an unethical scumbag.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
76,276
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Wishing I was in Stillwater
Hitlers rise to power and WW2 were direct results of an economic collapse. As were Moa's and Stalins rise to power. Not sure but it seems those events directly tied to economic collapse may have caused a couple of deaths.

Do you really think for one minute history won't repeat itself when some power hungry dictators can assume power for a loaf of bread.
P.S. I asked for proof of your assertion, not QAnon delusional hysterics. Proof includes things like, you know, actual evidence. Current actual evidence. Like people turning each other into Soylent green and stuff. "This happened in Ancient Rome and could happen again" isn't proof, it's speculation and opinion.

Here, maybe this graphic will help you out...
1594895941472.png
 
Mar 11, 2006
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Sort of like if inner city gangs went to the suburbs and shot older people instead of each other so we listed the death rates of inner city gang members and said, “Gee, this isn’t such a big deal.”
If there were a lot of senior citizens attending elementary and high school then that odd attempt at an analogy may have made some sense.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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Boulder, CO
Keep trying to fit that sofa into your Prius, Mr. Man Bun.

Not knowing anything about his son's age or health and making the comments you have only make you an ass. So, just stop. What will you say now if his son dies?

There is every reason to be concerned about COVID-19 morbidity and mortality in a 50 year old.

COVID-19 deaths by age group.

View attachment 83621
Your disappointment's noted.
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
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Stupid about AGW!!
Interesting. Are children vectors of transmission?
According to the CDC. Yes children can spread the virus and even have their OWN unique complication from it called multisystem inflammatory syndrome

If children meet in groups, it can put everyone at risk. Children can pass this virus onto others

CDC and partners are investigating cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19. Learn more about COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C).

It is also of note that two Sleep away camps had to close in the last 2 weeks due to large outbreaks of COVID in the children campers. One in Missouri and one in Georgia

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/children/protect-children.html

Now while COVID spreads in children, it appears to spread at a rate that is 50% less than adult to adult transmission. However, that still means it does spread in Children

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-...y-different-in-young-kids-versus-adults-67637


The major important thing here is that children are not at a Zero % risk of spreading between themselves. With an Rvalue of 1 or slightly greater in adults in the US this would put the Rvalue at 0.5 if it spreads at 1/2 the rate for child to child which would put in in the same range as MERS

7/15/2020 Oklahoma Pediatric New COVID-19 Cases

2189 total pediatric cases
1713 age 5-17 (121 new)
476 age 0-4 (33 new)
1 death (0 new)
 
Last edited:
Oct 30, 2007
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P.S. I asked for proof of your assertion, not QAnon delusional hysterics. Proof includes things like, you know, actual evidence. Current actual evidence. Like people turning each other into Soylent green and stuff. "This happened in Ancient Rome and could happen again" isn't proof, it's speculation and opinion.
There are approximately 9 million people that starve to death every year due to poverty. The UN said that that number could double due to the economic fallout from the virus. There will undoubtedly be significant loss of life due to the world's economy shutting down.

The debate about reopening schools is an interesting one. I heard an educator say recently that many students didn't retain much of what they learned from home last year. He said that another year of virtual learning could set some kids back significantly in life from an educational standpoint.

I think that we have to reopen schools, but we should do so as safely as possible. Teachers & students should be given the option of virtual teaching/learning if they fall into an at-risk category. This should remove some students from classrooms & allow for better social distancing. The government needs to step up and provide them with the funding they need for safety measures. We just have to make the best of a bad situation.

These are unprecedented times. I sure hope they end soon.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200710100934.htm

The data are striking," said Dr. Raszka. "The key takeaway is that children are not driving the pandemic. After six months, we have a wealth of accumulating data showing that children are less likely to become infected and seem less infectious; it is congregating adults who aren't following safety protocols who are responsible for driving the upward curve."

Additional support for the notion that children are not significant vectors of the disease comes from mathematical modeling, the authors say. Models show that community-wide social distancing and widespread adoption of facial cloth coverings are far better strategies for curtailing disease spread, and that closing schools adds little. The fact that schools have reopened in many Western European countries and in Japan without seeing a rise in community transmissions bears out the accuracy of the modeling.
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
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Stupid about AGW!!
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200710100934.htm

The fact that schools have reopened in many Western European countries and in Japan without seeing a rise in community transmissions bears out the accuracy of the modeling.
Here is the current situation of schools being opened. The ones in Blue are the countries who have currently opened their public schools. The ones in Purple are shut down and the ones in Pink have localized school openings based on the current local situation of COVID in their region

1594908729629.png
 
Jul 25, 2018
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https://www.yahoo.com/gma/icu-death...-suggests-090524375--abc-news-topstories.html
he authors systematically reviewed and performed a meta-analysis on all studies that looked at ICU deaths for adult patients around the world admitted with COVID-19. The death rate for these patients in May was about 40%, down from nearly 60% at the end of March.

"I think we are much better off now," said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security, who is board certified in critical care and infectious diseases. "We have a better understanding of the pathophysiology of disease, we have better tools to improve patient care and we are more knowledgeable about ventilator management in these patients."

"People are getting lower doses of viral inoculants" and "lower exposure" largely due to the strategies implemented to limit spread, Dr. Adalja said. If fewer people become critically ill with the virus due to such measures, then ICU death rates rates may further decline as more novel treatments continue to emerge.
MORE: Arizona doctors worry as ICUs fill: 'We’re leaving the hospital sometimes in tears'
"Things that were slipping through the cracks in the beginning" of the pandemic are no longer being missed, said Dr. Adalja. "We should expect to see this trend continue."