Colorado PAUSE act

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Donnyboy

Lettin' the high times carry the low....
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Oct 31, 2005
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#43
Question: Are these measures for all meat products sold in the state or just produced. Because if there are not restrictions on imports all they are doing is crushing part of their economy.
 

osupsycho

MAXIMUM EFFORT!!!
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Valhalla
#44
Question: Are these measures for all meat products sold in the state or just produced. Because if there are not restrictions on imports all they are doing is crushing part of their economy.
For Colorado at least it is for all animals born in the state. They are saying you cannot take them to another state to get around the rules such as slaughter age. But pretty sure that moves them into the federal rules on interstate commerce so not sure they will be able to get that part done even if they get the rest.
 

Donnyboy

Lettin' the high times carry the low....
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#45
For Colorado at least it is for all animals born in the state. They are saying you cannot take them to another state to get around the rules such as slaughter age. But pretty sure that moves them into the federal rules on interstate commerce so not sure they will be able to get that part done even if they get the rest.
Even if you can it just means no more cows born there.....just more 10 miles away in Kansas, Ok, Tex.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
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#46
This won't pass, but they will then want "compromise" or the next proposal will seem much softer and perhaps get more widespread support and pass. The end result of this will be more regulations further driving up the cost of production. This is a long term strategy to make production of animal protein to expensive for consumers to afford.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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Edmond
#47
This is a long term strategy to make production of animal protein to expensive for consumers to afford.
This ^^^^


They have done this in the waste industry for years. They push recycling, and guess what recycling is not free. The public thinks it is and even thinks they should get a rebate. 10 years ago, recycling cost about $50 per ton to process. and that number has increased to 60 per ton. 10 years ago landfill fees were around 18 per ton, now they have increased rates by over 10 per ton since Biden has taken office.
 

osupsycho

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#48
Even if you can it just means no more cows born there.....just more 10 miles away in Kansas, Ok, Tex.
Not exactly easy for games that have been there for generations and the places they would move too already have cattle etc so no more room mostly. But what about the slaughter houses? Those can move but will take years to get back up and running. If this passes it WILL cause meat shortages.
 
Dec 16, 2019
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Stillwater
#49
From my understanding I think decriminalizing "hard drugs" is more so that said addicts can get mental help for their addiction rather than just being thrown into jail and not recieving any help, but I may be wrong on this one.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
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#51
How ironic will it be if every animal in the state goes straight to the slaughter house?

I really wish we could bring back COOL
I'm not a fan of COOL. If there truly is added value in Country of Origin Labeling then retailers would demand it and producers/packers would produce it. Why do we need more regulations?

You can already buy country of origin products. Let the market drive it.
 

wrenhal

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Aug 11, 2011
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#52
Sounds like some states that are big on cattle farming are going to benefit from this greatly. Oregon and Colorado are effectively eliminating themselves from competition for cattle dollars.

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If it passes in Colorado there will be food shortages lasting years and thousands will likely end up bankrupt. Colorado has quite a bit of meat processing that would be out of business if this passes. When those shut down for covid (and just those sites), there was meat shortages and that was a temporary shutdown only. This passing would cripple the meat supply likely for years. Also Colorado is the biggest lamb/sheep meat processing state and this passing would mean none of that till other manufacturing could be built in other states and get running (so likely years). The ones trying to get this into law know all this and it is apparently their actual goal. To force vegan/vegetarian on people through lack of options.
I agree that this is a bunch of radicals pushing vegan on the populace.

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Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
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#56

In the United States, food waste is estimated at between 30–40 percent of the food supply. This figure, based on estimates from USDA’s Economic Research Service of 31 percent food loss at the retail and consumer levels, corresponded to approximately 133 billion pounds and $161 billion worth of food in 2010. Wasted food is the single largest category of material placed in municipal landfills...

https://www.fda.gov/food/consumers/food-loss-and-waste

Imagine the impact on climate change if you just stopped wasting so much food.

Something for you tomorrow.

Stop Food Waste Friday
 
Sep 6, 2012
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Edmond
#57
From my understanding I think decriminalizing "hard drugs" is more so that said addicts can get mental help for their addiction rather than just being thrown into jail and not recieving any help, but I may be wrong on this one.
Let me help your addiction and justify using by decriminalizing it. ;)
 
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