Colorado PAUSE act

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Dec 18, 2019
306
79
78
41
Central Oklahoma
#24
Now we are told we should only consume 4 lbs of meat a year you know because of climate change and cow farts. How far does this have to go before the voters in even some of the bluest states step up and say enough is enough?
For anybody that truly believes the nonsense about how cow farts are destroying the climate I have a challenger for you. You sleep in the garage with a running car and I’ll sleep in a barn full of cows. Let’s report back tomorrow morning and see how the night went.
 

andylicious

Territorial Marshal
Nov 16, 2013
5,082
2,500
743
35
tractor
#25
Now we are told we should only consume 4 lbs of meat a year you know because of climate change and cow farts. How far does this have to go before the voters in even some of the bluest states step up and say enough is enough?
For anybody that truly believes the nonsense about how cow farts are destroying the climate I have a challenger for you. You sleep in the garage with a running car and I’ll sleep in a barn full of cows. Let’s report back tomorrow morning and see how the night went.
That requires a conditional statement. If said cows have been enjoying a diet of sweet and tasty wheat I might want to specify a wet suit.
 
Dec 18, 2019
306
79
78
41
Central Oklahoma
#28
And the insanity continues. This times it’s Oregon

Oregon initiative would ban animal slaughter, breeding

IP13 would classify slaughter as aggravated abuse, redefine AI and castration as sexual assault.

Tim Hearden | Apr 22, 2021
An Oregon ballot initiative proposed for 2022 would effectively criminalize the farming of food animals in the state by classifying their slaughter as aggravated abuse and redefining artificial insemination and castration as sexual assault.

Initiative Petition 13, filed with Oregon elections officials in November, would remove farmer exemptions from existing laws barring animal cruelty and specifically target practices used for “(b)reeding domestic, livestock, and equine animals,” according to the text of the initiative.

The proposed Abuse, Neglect, and Assault Exemption Modification and Improvement Act would delete all references to “good animal husbandry” from state statute and only allow an animal to be injured in cases of a human’s self-defense. A veterinarian’s spaying and neutering of household pets would still be exempt.

The initiative’s sponsor, a group called End Animal Cruelty, is beginning to gather the 112,000 signatures they’ll need by next summer and is working through the national progressive network ActBlue to recruit volunteers for the effort, animal activist David Michelson recently told Portland’s KBOO-FM, a donor-supported radio station.

“It would radically transform how we treat animals in the state of Oregon,” Michelson told the station.

‘Sanctuary state for animals’

“If this passes,” he told KBOO, “Oregon would essentially be a sanctuary state for animals. Any animal in the state of Oregon would have their rights more or less codified in law, that they deserve a life free of abuse, neglect or sexual assault.”

Michelson said the initiative wouldn’t ban animal agriculture entirely, nor would it abolish the sale of meat, leather or fur in Oregon. But livestock would have to die of natural causes before it could be used for food production, and “forced impregnation” of livestock would be outlawed, he said. Violators would face criminal prosecution.

Representatives of the Yes on IP13 campaign did not return an email from Farm Progress seeking comment.

Related: Nation's eyes on Colorado meat fight

Livestock groups say the initiative has dangerous implications for their industry. They note that language in the proposal specifically targets livestock transportation, poultry production and commonly accepted slaughter methods as well as fishing, hunting, trapping, wildlife management and other animal-related activities.

“From my experience, I can tell you the reason the cattle industry leans heavily on AI (artificial insemination) is improved genetics, which means they’re more efficient with feed, more efficient with every aspect” including rate of gain, Oregon Cattlemen’s Association executive director Tammy Dennee told Farm Progress. “It certainly would be problematic to have that taken away.

“If you really boil it down, we’re talking about local food production,” she said. “There’s a high degree of consumer awareness about purchasing local and understanding the local food supply, and you do not get better local food production than with a local beef producer.”

Colorado initiative

The proposal comes as animal-welfare activists in Colorado are gathering signatures for a similar 2022 ballot measure called the Protect Animals from Unnecessary Suffering and Exploitation (PAUSE) initiative.

It would ban artificial insemination and other commonly accepted veterinary and animal care practices in Colorado and would ban the slaughter of livestock that have not yet lived more than one-quarter of their anticipated lifetime, which for cattle would be about five years.

Opponents including the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association are sparring with backers over the initiative’s ballot language while holding rallies and engaging in a media blitz to explain animal husbandry practices and reassure residents that ranchers care about the humane treatment of livestock.

Related: Colorado ag unites to celebrate livestock industry

“It’s hard for people to pursue these in some places but easier in others,” said John Robinson, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s senior vice president of membership and communications. “Certainly they’re floating these in low-hanging states.”

The NCBA is serving as “a clearinghouse of information” as it coordinates with state cattlemen’s associations and ranchers to fight the measures, Robinson told Farm Progress.

“It’s important for livestock producers to present a unified front to see that these things are knocked down when they pop up,” he said.

About 1.3 million head

Oregon’s roughly 12,000 beef producers raise about 1.3 million head of cattle in the state’s 36 counties, the OCA’s Dennee said. In addition, many Northern California ranchers truck thousands of head of cattle into Oregon for summer pasture. As cows have a 9-month gestation cycle, AI for spring calving would happen in the summer.

“Given the fact that CCA has members who are right on the border of Oregon and operate in both states, any measures gaining momentum in Oregon similar to Colorado’s proposal could be concerning,” said Katie Roberti, the California Cattlemen’s Association’s communications director.

“There could also be concerns of implications for the California ranchers whose cattle split their time between Oregon and California during the year, depending on when grass and feed is best available,” Roberti said in an email.

Related: Activists urge scrutiny on 'mega-dairies' amid lawsuit

Oregon’s Dennee said her organization will be working with the Oregon Farm Bureau and other farm groups to mount an opposition campaign in the coming months. “This is an important issue for us,” she said. “We will monitor it closely.”

Even if the measure fails to qualify for the ballot or is defeated, psychologist-turned-activist Michelson won’t give up, he told KBOO. He cited recent surveys by Oklahoma State University and an animal-welfare think tank that found 47% of U.S. respondents want to ban slaughterhouses, and large majorities are uncomfortable with the overall treatment of animals.

He noted that women’s suffrage in Oregon passed by ballot initiative on the sixth try.

“We’ll just keep putting it before voters,” he said, “until a better world is here.”
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
11,071
4,312
1,743
#29
And the insanity continues. This times it’s Oregon

Oregon initiative would ban animal slaughter, breeding

IP13 would classify slaughter as aggravated abuse, redefine AI and castration as sexual assault.

Tim Hearden | Apr 22, 2021
An Oregon ballot initiative proposed for 2022 would effectively criminalize the farming of food animals in the state by classifying their slaughter as aggravated abuse and redefining artificial insemination and castration as sexual assault.

Initiative Petition 13, filed with Oregon elections officials in November, would remove farmer exemptions from existing laws barring animal cruelty and specifically target practices used for “(b)reeding domestic, livestock, and equine animals,” according to the text of the initiative.

The proposed Abuse, Neglect, and Assault Exemption Modification and Improvement Act would delete all references to “good animal husbandry” from state statute and only allow an animal to be injured in cases of a human’s self-defense. A veterinarian’s spaying and neutering of household pets would still be exempt.

The initiative’s sponsor, a group called End Animal Cruelty, is beginning to gather the 112,000 signatures they’ll need by next summer and is working through the national progressive network ActBlue to recruit volunteers for the effort, animal activist David Michelson recently told Portland’s KBOO-FM, a donor-supported radio station.

“It would radically transform how we treat animals in the state of Oregon,” Michelson told the station.

‘Sanctuary state for animals’

“If this passes,” he told KBOO, “Oregon would essentially be a sanctuary state for animals. Any animal in the state of Oregon would have their rights more or less codified in law, that they deserve a life free of abuse, neglect or sexual assault.”

Michelson said the initiative wouldn’t ban animal agriculture entirely, nor would it abolish the sale of meat, leather or fur in Oregon. But livestock would have to die of natural causes before it could be used for food production, and “forced impregnation” of livestock would be outlawed, he said. Violators would face criminal prosecution.

Representatives of the Yes on IP13 campaign did not return an email from Farm Progress seeking comment.

Related: Nation's eyes on Colorado meat fight

Livestock groups say the initiative has dangerous implications for their industry. They note that language in the proposal specifically targets livestock transportation, poultry production and commonly accepted slaughter methods as well as fishing, hunting, trapping, wildlife management and other animal-related activities.

“From my experience, I can tell you the reason the cattle industry leans heavily on AI (artificial insemination) is improved genetics, which means they’re more efficient with feed, more efficient with every aspect” including rate of gain, Oregon Cattlemen’s Association executive director Tammy Dennee told Farm Progress. “It certainly would be problematic to have that taken away.

“If you really boil it down, we’re talking about local food production,” she said. “There’s a high degree of consumer awareness about purchasing local and understanding the local food supply, and you do not get better local food production than with a local beef producer.”

Colorado initiative

The proposal comes as animal-welfare activists in Colorado are gathering signatures for a similar 2022 ballot measure called the Protect Animals from Unnecessary Suffering and Exploitation (PAUSE) initiative.

It would ban artificial insemination and other commonly accepted veterinary and animal care practices in Colorado and would ban the slaughter of livestock that have not yet lived more than one-quarter of their anticipated lifetime, which for cattle would be about five years.

Opponents including the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association are sparring with backers over the initiative’s ballot language while holding rallies and engaging in a media blitz to explain animal husbandry practices and reassure residents that ranchers care about the humane treatment of livestock.

Related: Colorado ag unites to celebrate livestock industry

“It’s hard for people to pursue these in some places but easier in others,” said John Robinson, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s senior vice president of membership and communications. “Certainly they’re floating these in low-hanging states.”

The NCBA is serving as “a clearinghouse of information” as it coordinates with state cattlemen’s associations and ranchers to fight the measures, Robinson told Farm Progress.

“It’s important for livestock producers to present a unified front to see that these things are knocked down when they pop up,” he said.

About 1.3 million head

Oregon’s roughly 12,000 beef producers raise about 1.3 million head of cattle in the state’s 36 counties, the OCA’s Dennee said. In addition, many Northern California ranchers truck thousands of head of cattle into Oregon for summer pasture. As cows have a 9-month gestation cycle, AI for spring calving would happen in the summer.

“Given the fact that CCA has members who are right on the border of Oregon and operate in both states, any measures gaining momentum in Oregon similar to Colorado’s proposal could be concerning,” said Katie Roberti, the California Cattlemen’s Association’s communications director.

“There could also be concerns of implications for the California ranchers whose cattle split their time between Oregon and California during the year, depending on when grass and feed is best available,” Roberti said in an email.

Related: Activists urge scrutiny on 'mega-dairies' amid lawsuit

Oregon’s Dennee said her organization will be working with the Oregon Farm Bureau and other farm groups to mount an opposition campaign in the coming months. “This is an important issue for us,” she said. “We will monitor it closely.”

Even if the measure fails to qualify for the ballot or is defeated, psychologist-turned-activist Michelson won’t give up, he told KBOO. He cited recent surveys by Oklahoma State University and an animal-welfare think tank that found 47% of U.S. respondents want to ban slaughterhouses, and large majorities are uncomfortable with the overall treatment of animals.

He noted that women’s suffrage in Oregon passed by ballot initiative on the sixth try.

“We’ll just keep putting it before voters,” he said, “until a better world is here.”
Sounds like some states that are big on cattle farming are going to benefit from this greatly. Oregon and Colorado are effectively eliminating themselves from competition for cattle dollars.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 
Sep 6, 2012
2,407
980
743
Edmond
#31
And the insanity continues. This times it’s Oregon

Oregon initiative would ban animal slaughter, breeding

IP13 would classify slaughter as aggravated abuse, redefine AI and castration as sexual assault.

Tim Hearden | Apr 22, 2021
An Oregon ballot initiative proposed for 2022 would effectively criminalize the farming of food animals in the state by classifying their slaughter as aggravated abuse and redefining artificial insemination and castration as sexual assault.

Initiative Petition 13, filed with Oregon elections officials in November, would remove farmer exemptions from existing laws barring animal cruelty and specifically target practices used for “(b)reeding domestic, livestock, and equine animals,” according to the text of the initiative.

The proposed Abuse, Neglect, and Assault Exemption Modification and Improvement Act would delete all references to “good animal husbandry” from state statute and only allow an animal to be injured in cases of a human’s self-defense. A veterinarian’s spaying and neutering of household pets would still be exempt.

The initiative’s sponsor, a group called End Animal Cruelty, is beginning to gather the 112,000 signatures they’ll need by next summer and is working through the national progressive network ActBlue to recruit volunteers for the effort, animal activist David Michelson recently told Portland’s KBOO-FM, a donor-supported radio station.

“It would radically transform how we treat animals in the state of Oregon,” Michelson told the station.

‘Sanctuary state for animals’

“If this passes,” he told KBOO, “Oregon would essentially be a sanctuary state for animals. Any animal in the state of Oregon would have their rights more or less codified in law, that they deserve a life free of abuse, neglect or sexual assault.”

Michelson said the initiative wouldn’t ban animal agriculture entirely, nor would it abolish the sale of meat, leather or fur in Oregon. But livestock would have to die of natural causes before it could be used for food production, and “forced impregnation” of livestock would be outlawed, he said. Violators would face criminal prosecution.

Representatives of the Yes on IP13 campaign did not return an email from Farm Progress seeking comment.

Related: Nation's eyes on Colorado meat fight

Livestock groups say the initiative has dangerous implications for their industry. They note that language in the proposal specifically targets livestock transportation, poultry production and commonly accepted slaughter methods as well as fishing, hunting, trapping, wildlife management and other animal-related activities.

“From my experience, I can tell you the reason the cattle industry leans heavily on AI (artificial insemination) is improved genetics, which means they’re more efficient with feed, more efficient with every aspect” including rate of gain, Oregon Cattlemen’s Association executive director Tammy Dennee told Farm Progress. “It certainly would be problematic to have that taken away.

“If you really boil it down, we’re talking about local food production,” she said. “There’s a high degree of consumer awareness about purchasing local and understanding the local food supply, and you do not get better local food production than with a local beef producer.”

Colorado initiative

The proposal comes as animal-welfare activists in Colorado are gathering signatures for a similar 2022 ballot measure called the Protect Animals from Unnecessary Suffering and Exploitation (PAUSE) initiative.

It would ban artificial insemination and other commonly accepted veterinary and animal care practices in Colorado and would ban the slaughter of livestock that have not yet lived more than one-quarter of their anticipated lifetime, which for cattle would be about five years.

Opponents including the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association are sparring with backers over the initiative’s ballot language while holding rallies and engaging in a media blitz to explain animal husbandry practices and reassure residents that ranchers care about the humane treatment of livestock.

Related: Colorado ag unites to celebrate livestock industry

“It’s hard for people to pursue these in some places but easier in others,” said John Robinson, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s senior vice president of membership and communications. “Certainly they’re floating these in low-hanging states.”

The NCBA is serving as “a clearinghouse of information” as it coordinates with state cattlemen’s associations and ranchers to fight the measures, Robinson told Farm Progress.

“It’s important for livestock producers to present a unified front to see that these things are knocked down when they pop up,” he said.

About 1.3 million head

Oregon’s roughly 12,000 beef producers raise about 1.3 million head of cattle in the state’s 36 counties, the OCA’s Dennee said. In addition, many Northern California ranchers truck thousands of head of cattle into Oregon for summer pasture. As cows have a 9-month gestation cycle, AI for spring calving would happen in the summer.

“Given the fact that CCA has members who are right on the border of Oregon and operate in both states, any measures gaining momentum in Oregon similar to Colorado’s proposal could be concerning,” said Katie Roberti, the California Cattlemen’s Association’s communications director.

“There could also be concerns of implications for the California ranchers whose cattle split their time between Oregon and California during the year, depending on when grass and feed is best available,” Roberti said in an email.

Related: Activists urge scrutiny on 'mega-dairies' amid lawsuit

Oregon’s Dennee said her organization will be working with the Oregon Farm Bureau and other farm groups to mount an opposition campaign in the coming months. “This is an important issue for us,” she said. “We will monitor it closely.”

Even if the measure fails to qualify for the ballot or is defeated, psychologist-turned-activist Michelson won’t give up, he told KBOO. He cited recent surveys by Oklahoma State University and an animal-welfare think tank that found 47% of U.S. respondents want to ban slaughterhouses, and large majorities are uncomfortable with the overall treatment of animals.

He noted that women’s suffrage in Oregon passed by ballot initiative on the sixth try.

“We’ll just keep putting it before voters,” he said, “until a better world is here.”
Ban cattle and take LSD- Makes perfect sense.

Oregon has become the first US state to decriminalize possession of hard drugs like heroin, cocaine, and LSD
https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/oregon-has-become-the-first-us-state-to-decriminalize-possession-of-hard-drugs-like-heroin-cocaine-and-lsd/ar-BB1aCx1c#:~:text=Oregon has become the first US state to,weeks after accusing hospital staff of racist treatment
 

osupsycho

MAXIMUM EFFORT!!!
A/V Subscriber
Apr 20, 2005
5,575
2,982
1,743
Valhalla
#32
Sounds like some states that are big on cattle farming are going to benefit from this greatly. Oregon and Colorado are effectively eliminating themselves from competition for cattle dollars.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
If it passes in Colorado there will be food shortages lasting years and thousands will likely end up bankrupt. Colorado has quite a bit of meat processing that would be out of business if this passes. When those shut down for covid (and just those sites), there was meat shortages and that was a temporary shutdown only. This passing would cripple the meat supply likely for years. Also Colorado is the biggest lamb/sheep meat processing state and this passing would mean none of that till other manufacturing could be built in other states and get running (so likely years). The ones trying to get this into law know all this and it is apparently their actual goal. To force vegan/vegetarian on people through lack of options.
 

andylicious

Territorial Marshal
Nov 16, 2013
5,082
2,500
743
35
tractor
#33
It amazes me that sectors of our society want to control every portion of other people's lives. The Impossible burger and all the fake meat stuff has really led to some bad conclusions. They do realize you have to have soybeans and chickpeas for that stuff and neither of those really grow well in the southwest.
 
Dec 18, 2019
306
79
78
41
Central Oklahoma
#34
This is a lot more than just ending meat production. It’s a national security issue. How do these idiots propose we replace millions of pounds of protein? A country of 330 million that cannot produce enough food to feed its citizens is no longer a independent nation and reliant on other countries for food.
 
Sep 3, 2010
272
77
1,578
#35
This is a lot more than just ending meat production. It’s a national security issue. How do these idiots propose we replace millions of pounds of protein? A country of 330 million that cannot produce enough food to feed its citizens is no longer a independent nation and reliant on other countries for food.
We’re already there. We currently have 4 packers that kill about 90% of all the cattle In the US. Two of them (JBS and National) are owned by Brazilian companies. We have allowed the industry to consolidate to the point that the ”Big Four” hold the entire complex hostage. They collude and take every opportunity to economically water board the rest of the industry. Meat prices are setting records and the packers have record margins and they will slow bid for fat cattle this week. To your point Smithfield Foods is owned by the Chinese and at least half of the hog and cattle kill is controlled by Brazil. Add to all of this the fact that nearly 90% of the ingredients for our pharmaceuticals and almost all of our electronics are produced in China and you can see where this is going.
 

andylicious

Territorial Marshal
Nov 16, 2013
5,082
2,500
743
35
tractor
#36
We’re already there. We currently have 4 packers that kill about 90% of all the cattle In the US. Two of them (JBS and National) are owned by Brazilian companies. We have allowed the industry to consolidate to the point that the ”Big Four” hold the entire complex hostage. They collude and take every opportunity to economically water board the rest of the industry. Meat prices are setting records and the packers have record margins and they will slow bid for fat cattle this week. To your point Smithfield Foods is owned by the Chinese and at least half of the hog and cattle kill is controlled by Brazil. Add to all of this the fact that nearly 90% of the ingredients for our pharmaceuticals and almost all of our electronics are produced in China and you can see where this is going.
That globalism has really worked out
 
Dec 18, 2019
306
79
78
41
Central Oklahoma
#38
We’re already there. We currently have 4 packers that kill about 90% of all the cattle In the US. Two of them (JBS and National) are owned by Brazilian companies. We have allowed the industry to consolidate to the point that the ”Big Four” hold the entire complex hostage. They collude and take every opportunity to economically water board the rest of the industry. Meat prices are setting records and the packers have record margins and they will slow bid for fat cattle this week. To your point Smithfield Foods is owned by the Chinese and at least half of the hog and cattle kill is controlled by Brazil. Add to all of this the fact that nearly 90% of the ingredients for our pharmaceuticals and almost all of our electronics are produced in China and you can see where this is going.
I understand your point. At least for now we still control the supply. New packing houses can be built when looked at from a national security issue.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
53,438
17,968
1,743
#39
Sounds like some states that are big on cattle farming are going to benefit from this greatly. Oregon and Colorado are effectively eliminating themselves from competition for cattle dollars.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
Colorado ranks #10 in total number of cattle, Oregon #26.

Colorado is the fourth largest state for cattle on feed, Oregon out of the top 10.

Colorado is the fourth largest state for cattle harvest.

It would wreck the US cattle markets and significantly increase the price of all meat products at retail.