Bitter COLD in Oklahoma!

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Donnyboy

Lettin' the high times carry the low....
A/V Subscriber
Oct 31, 2005
25,525
22,465
1,743
Your numbers are way off. Assuming 3 full days of disrupted power, that's 99.61% reliable. Get your story straight.
/sarcasm

Seriously, it's frustrating to be subjected to the cold that we were, but people really need to realize what they're asking when they want the grid to be able to handle events like this. It would be like me designing every part of a building for tornado-level wind speeds. It's nonsense, because it would cost 100x the same building designed for current code-level events.
Yeah if you take the uncontrolled loss of the Bryan/College station event about 15 years ago/ the 2011 winter event/and this one and then take the 51 year average it’s more like 99.99999999999 but who’s counting :p
 

andylicious

Territorial Marshal
Nov 16, 2013
5,017
2,488
743
35
tractor
Yes or contracted to lock in a set price all year long. A small town lets say agrees to buy from ong. They have a year long contract. In the contract they negotiate a price that they will buy it for that doesn't change during the contract.
Yep, except it normally is an October to March contract
 

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
7,180
3,464
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
How would you have managed it and how would other places have managed it. People don’t understand the scope of this storm. These were the coldest temps ever recorded in Texas for three days. Not one minute then back to 30 by noon. Texas is also gigantic.....and wasn’t the only one with problems. It it gets to 125 degrees or negative 30 with the largest single day snow even in history this summer/winter and stays there for three days in VT, MA,CT, ME, NY, NJ, PA,RI, NH then we’ll see how they do. Here’s a hint.....the won’t do well there were large customer outages and the forced outage rate of plants went up 22% in the 2014 polar vortex in the PJM (Penn, Jersey, Maryland covers more than those states largest interconnect in the eastern grid control area) interconnect when temps were similar then to what they were here and they should be made for it.
People are mad because the grid is so good we take it for granted. It is the most essential piece of infrastructure we have and it is far and away the cheapest and most dependable. It hiccuped during a weather event that will change design criteria.

So fix it.....fix something that is 99.9% reliable over the last 51 years and is cheaper than it was 25 years ago. And do it without changing people monthly bills that are probably less than they pay for a phone to play candy crush on or building anything near anyone.
I think I’m starting to love you
Your numbers are way off. Assuming 3 full days of disrupted power, that's 99.61% reliable. Get your story straight.
/sarcasm

Seriously, it's frustrating to be subjected to the cold that we were, but people really need to realize what they're asking when they want the grid to be able to handle events like this. It would be like me designing every part of a building for tornado-level wind speeds. It's nonsense, because it would cost 100x the same building designed for current code-level events.
I feel sorry for the palm tree lovers. I lost ten 50 year old oaks. And gained a 30 gallon bag of frozen critters.
If you want your electricity to work get a generator
They did, the first two days. Even preppers were caught off guard as the gas pumps froze In some places or no electricity to pump, some were closed because no employees made it or they ran out.