Baltimore no longer prosecuting crime

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

andylicious

Territorial Marshal
Nov 16, 2013
5,024
2,490
743
35
tractor
#21
Question: every state has asinine and outdated laws still “on the books”. Should they go about charging people for those crimes even though they are absurd? Example: In Oklahoma bigamy is a crime. I think it’s been charged once, but happens every day.
So you are saying it is commonplace to marry another person in a ceremony while already married? Data please and locales this is occurring in Oklahoma.
 
Oct 30, 2007
4,736
3,862
1,743
#22
Question: every state has asinine and outdated laws still “on the books”. Should they go about charging people for those crimes even though they are absurd? Example: In Oklahoma bigamy is a crime. I think it’s been charged once, but happens every day.
If a law becomes outdated, it's the responsibility of the legislative branch to amend or repeal it. It shouldn't be the executive branch's responsibility to decide which laws they should or shouldn't enforce.

I've never really understood why state legislators don't do their job by purging outdated laws from the books. My guess is that they're more interested in passing new legislation so that they can get re-elected.

Maybe I'm naive by expecting our government to function properly and maintain the proper separation of powers. I should probably expect dysfunction after seeing it for so long.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
72,126
41,239
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
#23
If a law becomes outdated, it's the responsibility of the legislative branch to amend or repeal it. It shouldn't be the executive branch's responsibility to decide which laws they should or shouldn't enforce.

I've never really understood why state legislators don't do their job by purging outdated laws from the books. My guess is that they're more interested in passing new legislation so that they can get re-elected.

Maybe I'm naive by expecting our government to function properly and maintain the proper separation of powers. I should probably expect dysfunction after seeing it for so long.
Why should the legislative branch take up their time and resources repealing laws that are outdated or unenforceable, when the AD could simply use her discretion and not prosecute them?
 
Oct 30, 2007
4,736
3,862
1,743
#24
The DA is an elected, political position. If you don't like how they use their discretion you can vote them out.

Ah, the slippery slope fallacy. Can you see in any real way a prosecutor declining to prosecute rape or murder?
That's true. If a DA goes rogue and abuses their power, the voters can remove them from office. The state of Maryland has options as well. All of these things are illegal at the state level, so they could step in and start prosecuting these crimes if the city of Baltimore refuses to.

I can't see a prosecutor declining to prosecute rape or murder. I was just using that as an example of how most people are okay with ignoring laws that they dislike, but they aren't okay with ignoring the laws that they support.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
72,126
41,239
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
#25
That's true. If a DA goes rogue and abuses their power, the voters can remove them from office. The state of Maryland has options as well. All of these things are illegal at the state level, so they could step in and start prosecuting these crimes if the city of Baltimore refuses to.

I can't see a prosecutor declining to prosecute rape or murder. I was just using that as an example of how most people are okay with ignoring laws that they dislike, but they aren't okay with ignoring the laws that they support.
You think the state has the resources to prosecute crimes that the Baltimore DA declines to prosecute? How would the state have jurisdiction?

https://www.baltimoresun.com/corona...0200318-u7knneb6o5gqvnqmtpejftavia-story.html

Baltimore State’s Attorney Mosby to stop prosecuting drug possession, prostitution, other crimes amid coronavirus
By TIM PRUDENTE and PHILLIP JACKSON
BALTIMORE SUN |
MAR 18, 2020 AT 8:33 PM

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby ordered her staff Wednesday to dismiss pending criminal charges against anyone arrested for possessing drugs including heroin, attempted distribution of any drug, prostitution, trespassing, minor traffic offenses, open container and urinating in public.

Mosby said she’s taking the action to reduce the threat of a coronavirus outbreak behind bars. These crimes pose no risk to public safety and the defendants would be released before trial in normal times, she wrote in a memo to prosecutors. (emphasis added)
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
16,334
17,097
1,743
Tulsa, OK
#27
Why should the legislative branch take up their time and resources repealing laws that are outdated or unenforceable, when the AD could simply use her discretion and not prosecute them?
Because we don't want an AD to be able to use their discretion to prosecute somebody for refusing to ride side saddle on a Sunday while wearing sandals simply because such a law is still on the books. ;)

Seriously, I agree, if the people of Baltimore are ok with this, who are we to tell them otherwise.
 
Oct 30, 2007
4,736
3,862
1,743
#28
You think the state has the resources to prosecute crimes that the Baltimore DA declines to prosecute? How would the state have jurisdiction?

https://www.baltimoresun.com/corona...0200318-u7knneb6o5gqvnqmtpejftavia-story.html

Baltimore State’s Attorney Mosby to stop prosecuting drug possession, prostitution, other crimes amid coronavirus
By TIM PRUDENTE and PHILLIP JACKSON
BALTIMORE SUN |
MAR 18, 2020 AT 8:33 PM

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby ordered her staff Wednesday to dismiss pending criminal charges against anyone arrested for possessing drugs including heroin, attempted distribution of any drug, prostitution, trespassing, minor traffic offenses, open container and urinating in public.

Mosby said she’s taking the action to reduce the threat of a coronavirus outbreak behind bars. These crimes pose no risk to public safety and the defendants would be released before trial in normal times, she wrote in a memo to prosecutors. (emphasis added)
I don't really know anything about Maryland's resources. I'm just saying that option exists if they want to take it. They have the jurisdiction to prosecute anyone that breaks state laws within their state borders.

I can understand (and even support) a prosecutor making these changes during a pandemic to minimize risk, but the original article posted in this thread says that she's making the changes permanent. That's something I won't support unless it comes from the legislative branch.

Why should the legislative branch take up their time and resources repealing laws that are outdated or unenforceable, when the AD could simply use her discretion and not prosecute them?
Why should Congress worry about passing legislation when the POTUS can easily do it through EO? Overreaching the separation of powers out of convenience isn't something I'll support at any level of government.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
72,126
41,239
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
#29
You think the state has the resources to prosecute crimes that the Baltimore DA declines to prosecute? How would the state have jurisdiction?

https://www.baltimoresun.com/corona...0200318-u7knneb6o5gqvnqmtpejftavia-story.html

Baltimore State’s Attorney Mosby to stop prosecuting drug possession, prostitution, other crimes amid coronavirus
By TIM PRUDENTE and PHILLIP JACKSON
BALTIMORE SUN |
MAR 18, 2020 AT 8:33 PM

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby ordered her staff Wednesday to dismiss pending criminal charges against anyone arrested for possessing drugs including heroin, attempted distribution of any drug, prostitution, trespassing, minor traffic offenses, open container and urinating in public.

Mosby said she’s taking the action to reduce the threat of a coronavirus outbreak behind bars. These crimes pose no risk to public safety and the defendants would be released before trial in normal times, she wrote in a memo to prosecutors. (emphasis added)
I don't really know anything about Maryland's resources. I'm just saying that option exists if they want to take it. They have the jurisdiction to prosecute anyone that breaks state laws within their state borders.

I can understand (and even support) a prosecutor making these changes during a pandemic to minimize risk, but the original article posted in this thread says that she's making the changes permanent. That's something I won't support unless it comes from the legislative branch.

Why should the legislative branch take up their time and resources repealing laws that are outdated or unenforceable, when the AD could simply use her discretion and not prosecute them?
Why should Congress worry about passing legislation when the POTUS can easily do it through EO? Overreaching the separation of powers out of convenience isn't something I'll support at any level of government.
Because, as we've seen, EO can usually be undone by the next guy.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
72,126
41,239
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
#30
You think the state has the resources to prosecute crimes that the Baltimore DA declines to prosecute? How would the state have jurisdiction?

https://www.baltimoresun.com/corona...0200318-u7knneb6o5gqvnqmtpejftavia-story.html

Baltimore State’s Attorney Mosby to stop prosecuting drug possession, prostitution, other crimes amid coronavirus
By TIM PRUDENTE and PHILLIP JACKSON
BALTIMORE SUN |
MAR 18, 2020 AT 8:33 PM

Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby ordered her staff Wednesday to dismiss pending criminal charges against anyone arrested for possessing drugs including heroin, attempted distribution of any drug, prostitution, trespassing, minor traffic offenses, open container and urinating in public.

Mosby said she’s taking the action to reduce the threat of a coronavirus outbreak behind bars. These crimes pose no risk to public safety and the defendants would be released before trial in normal times, she wrote in a memo to prosecutors. (emphasis added)
I don't really know anything about Maryland's resources. I'm just saying that option exists if they want to take it. They have the jurisdiction to prosecute anyone that breaks state laws within their state borders.

I can understand (and even support) a prosecutor making these changes during a pandemic to minimize risk, but the original article posted in this thread says that she's making the changes permanent. That's something I won't support unless it comes from the legislative branch.

Why should the legislative branch take up their time and resources repealing laws that are outdated or unenforceable, when the AD could simply use her discretion and not prosecute them?
Why should Congress worry about passing legislation when the POTUS can easily do it through EO? Overreaching the separation of powers out of convenience isn't something I'll support at any level of government.
She's making the changes permanent because she's seen a decrease in violent crime. Whether or not that is due to her discretion or the pandemic itself, well, we'll. One thing is for sure, if it all goes to sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee-it she could pay a political price.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 
Sep 29, 2011
2,481
554
743
61
Breckenridge, CO
#31
My point was based on the idea that the reader would have a basic understanding of the confines of the federal/state relationship in this country. Sorry, I over-assumed.
"This country is by design a union of different states with their own structure and planning which allows ideas to be tried locally without really affecting others. It amazes me that people can sit and complain about a different place trying something that might make their local situation better (or maybe worse) when it will have absolutely no effect on the complainer whatsoever. People simply fear the idea that what they believe in may not be true so bad mouth any test of their pre-conceived notions."

Like, who (in Oklahoma) cares if Tennessee (not the federal govt) outlaws abortion (tries something different) , or Montana (not the federal govt) makes heroin legal (tries something different) or WV (not the federal govt) expands capital punishment (tries something different) to all sorts of crimes? Afterall, such efforts should have absolutely no effect whatsoever on anyone in Oklahoma.

I would think someone stating a concise opinion (you) would understand a theoretical circumstance that directly addresses that opinion.
 
Last edited:
Oct 30, 2007
4,736
3,862
1,743
#32
She's making the changes permanent because she's seen a decrease in violent crime. Whether or not that is due to her discretion or the pandemic itself, well, we'll. One thing is for sure, if it all goes to sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee-it she could pay a political price.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
:lol: Maybe drugs and prostitution make people less violent.

1617032228947.png
 
Aug 11, 2004
1,668
61
1,678
42
Enid, OK
www.faulklawfirm.com
#35
If a law becomes outdated, it's the responsibility of the legislative branch to amend or repeal it. It shouldn't be the executive branch's responsibility to decide which laws they should or shouldn't enforce.

I've never really understood why state legislators don't do their job by purging outdated laws from the books. My guess is that they're more interested in passing new legislation so that they can get re-elected.

Maybe I'm naive by expecting our government to function properly and maintain the proper separation of powers. I should probably expect dysfunction after seeing it for so long.
You didn’t answer the question. So spitting on the sidewalk should be prosecuted? Bigamy (affairs)?
 
Oct 30, 2007
4,736
3,862
1,743
#36
You didn’t answer the question. So spitting on the sidewalk should be prosecuted? Bigamy (affairs)?
The executive branch should enforce every single law on the books. That would force the legislative branch to actually do their job. Just imagine how quickly embarrassing laws like that would get repealed if that happened.
 
Aug 11, 2004
1,668
61
1,678
42
Enid, OK
www.faulklawfirm.com
#37
The executive branch should enforce every single law on the books. That would force the legislative branch to actually do their job. Just imagine how quickly embarrassing laws like that would get repealed if that happened.
Yeah that’s not how it would work. The DA would be recalled or lose an election quick
If he started prosecuting every crime. Half of the population would be in prison for cheating on their spouses.
 
Last edited:

cowboyinexile

Have some class
A/V Subscriber
Jun 29, 2004
18,303
10,774
1,743
41
Fairmont, MN
#38
So you are saying it is commonplace to marry another person in a ceremony while already married? Data please and locales this is occurring in Oklahoma.
I wouldn't say it is commonplace but I bet it happens. Most of us are smart enough to make sure we are divorced before getting married again, but there are plenty of morons out there.

But as an offensive that deserves to be prosecuted? I agree with your sentiment. I'm sure there are a couple of people who tried to pull something but it's gotta be a really rare occurrence.
 

steross

he/him
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
30,765
32,205
1,743
oklahoma city
#39
"This country is by design a union of different states with their own structure and planning which allows ideas to be tried locally without really affecting others. It amazes me that people can sit and complain about a different place trying something that might make their local situation better (or maybe worse) when it will have absolutely no effect on the complainer whatsoever. People simply fear the idea that what they believe in may not be true so bad mouth any test of their pre-conceived notions."

Like, who (in Oklahoma) cares if Tennessee (not the federal govt) outlaws abortion (tries something different) , or Montana (not the federal govt) makes heroin legal (tries something different) or WV (not the federal govt) expands capital punishment (tries something different) to all sorts of crimes? Afterall, such efforts should have absolutely no effect whatsoever on anyone in Oklahoma.

I would think someone stating a concise opinion (you) would understand a theoretical circumstance that directly addresses that opinion.
Doubling down on your lack of understanding of the federal/state relationship with an even longer post saying the same thing didn't really change anything.
 

Jostate

Bluecolla's sock
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
21,546
14,981
1,743
#40
Seriously, I agree, if the people of Baltimore are ok with this, who are we to tell them otherwise.
They have the right to do it just like the people of Minneapolis have the right to try the "no mo police" that was shouted last summer.

We have the right to predict the outcome and mock them if we are correct, or possibly learn from it if their approach is correct.