Andrew Yang for Mayor of NYC

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Sep 12, 2008
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#1
NYC Mayoral Democratic Primary Polling:

Yang: 28%
Adams: 17%
Stringer: 13%
Donovan: 8%
Wiley: 8%
Garcia: 2%
Morales: 2%
McGuire: 2%

Can he win it?
 

Midnight Toker

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May 28, 2010
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#4
Yang is my favorite politician. He was the first democrat I ever voted for and I think he'd have won the election had he been nominated. He's an easy going genius who is easy to talk to, who cares less about blaming others and politicizing an issue as he does care about just fixing problems. We need a personality like his in positions of leadership. I only wish i could vote for him in this mayoral race. But hey, maybe i'll get a chance to vote for him for potus again. being the mayor of the most famous city in the country will make him well known and perhaps well enough to be a real player in an election.

he's the only politician who is talking about our data. he's the only one warning us about AI. He wants to take private money out of election campaigns. he's trying to have conversations that nobody else is even thinking about. MATH
 
Jun 4, 2014
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#6
The UBI thing is the topic that got me on Yang. I could be fine with it, but I'd want to see an equitable reduction in other welfare benefits to offset it. Living off the state is a very slippery slope that we are losing ground on.

Most of the other things Toker mentions above I really like about the guy.
 

steross

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#7
The UBI thing is the topic that got me on Yang. I could be fine with it, but I'd want to see an equitable reduction in other welfare benefits to offset it. Living off the state is a very slippery slope that we are losing ground on.

Most of the other things Toker mentions above I really like about the guy.
There was a reduction in other welfare benefits with his plan. That actually cost him votes as his plan stopped SSI payments (the welfare ones) but not SSDI (the disability you pay for with SS taxes).
 

Midnight Toker

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#8
I actually could have voted for Yang as well. I long for the day I can get excited to vote FOR a presidential candidate instead of AGAINST one.
Precisely my thoughts. I was in Yang groups on social media, no fighting, no bickering or arguing. When people brought up contrary points, they actually just talked it out. really refreshing. Some people like to say that rump supporters are worse than rump himself. Well, Yang supporters have the opposite problem, they seem like good folks who would rather get things done than politics as usual. And the best part , to me? These groups were full of democrats, republicans, liberal and conservative, young people and older. We clamor for a uniter? I think he's one of those types of people. Has anyone anything bad to say about the guy? Other than maybe being idealistic.

The UBI thing is the topic that got me on Yang. I could be fine with it, but I'd want to see an equitable reduction in other welfare benefits to offset it. Living off the state is a very slippery slope that we are losing ground on.

Most of the other things Toker mentions above I really like about the guy.
When i first heard about UBI all i wanted to do was argue about how dumb it is, and how it would be impossible to implement and afford. But I said all these things without having seen the details of his plans. In regard to welfare benefits- They could choose between existing welfare benefits or the UBI. Most would choose UBI. So it would inherently decrease the demand on most welfare programs. But it would also stack on top of some others. Just depends.. But they project something in the neighborhood of a few hundred billion in entitlements to be absorbed by UBI.

After my initial skepticism, i talked to Yang supporters who basically talked me through things and won me over. It wasnt long after that i actually sent some of MY money to a damn politician. And a democrat on top of that ?!?! I even got my strongly ardent rump supporter and extreme conservative father to say nice things about him when he heard about his ideas.
 
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steross

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#9
When i first heard about UBI all i wanted to do was argue about how dumb it is, and how it would be impossible to implement and afford. But I said all these things without having seen the details of his plans. In regard to welfare benefits- They could choose between existing welfare benefits or the UBI. Most would choose UBI. So it would inherently decrease the demand on most welfare programs. But it would also stack on top of some others. Just depends.. But they project something in the neighborhood of a few hundred billion in entitlements to be absorbed by UBI.
Same. But, it just shows the deeply ingrained problems with our system that someone like him had to fight to even get on the debate stage, they made rules as they went along to avoid him, and finally, when he did get to debate he got by far the least time. You could say the last part is partially his fault as he did not scream and talk over people as others did. But, that would be joining them not changing things. It is sad.
 

steross

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And, another thing I think we all can agree on, Trump getting elected showed how desperate the American people are for change. And a Trump vs Yang race would have been exactly what the majority of Americans want. Two politicians wanting to change things in their own ways and we get to decide which philosophy is better. That would have been a real political choice. Instead, we got what amounted to a referendum on Trump.
 

Midnight Toker

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#11
Same. But, it just shows the deeply ingrained problems with our system that someone like him had to fight to even get on the debate stage, they made rules as they went along to avoid him, and finally, when he did get to debate he got by far the least time. You could say the last part is partially his fault as he did not scream and talk over people as others did. But, that would be joining them not changing things. It is sad.
They tend to do that to folks who would disrupt the status quo. Did it to sanders too. it's unfortunate, but hey as a former mayor of NYC he would carry a lot of clout.
 

Birry

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Feb 6, 2007
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#12
Precisely my thoughts. I was in Yang groups on social media, no fighting, no bickering or arguing. When people brought up contrary points, they actually just talked it out. really refreshing. Some people like to say that rump supporters are worse than rump himself. Well, Yang supporters have the opposite problem, they seem like good folks who would rather get things done than politics as usual. And the best part , to me? These groups were full of democrats, republicans, liberal and conservative, young people and older. We clamor for a uniter? I think he's one of those types of people. Has anyone anything bad to say about the guy? Other than maybe being idealistic.


When i first heard about UBI all i wanted to do was argue about how dumb it is, and how it would be impossible to implement and afford. But I said all these things without having seen the details of his plans. In regard to welfare benefits- They could choose between existing welfare benefits or the UBI. Most would choose UBI. So it would inherently decrease the demand on most welfare programs. But it would also stack on top of some others. Just depends.. But they project something in the neighborhood of a few hundred billion in entitlements to be absorbed by UBI.

After my initial skepticism, i talked to Yang supporters who basically talked me through things and won me over. It wasnt long after that i actually sent some of MY money to a damn politician. And a democrat on top of that ?!?! I even got my strongly ardent rump supporter and extreme conservative father to say nice things about him when he heard about his ideas.
Isn't UBI kinda coupled with the idea that AI and automation will produce (or already produces) enough that those systems could support populations without human effort? Like, if you no longer need truck drivers due to self-driving trucks, then they're all out of work, but the job is still being done. So tax the heck out of the operation, and re-distribute to the drivers that no longer have a job due to automation.
 

drbwh

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#13
I could possibly have voted for him. I probably would have still voted libertarian, but would have picked him over trump if those were my only two choices. I don’t agree with some of his positions, but I like his thought process and how he appears to be logical and not emotional.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Midnight Toker

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#14
Isn't UBI kinda coupled with the idea that AI and automation will produce (or already produces) enough that those systems could support populations without human effort? Like, if you no longer need truck drivers due to self-driving trucks, then they're all out of work, but the job is still being done. So tax the heck out of the operation, and re-distribute to the drivers that no longer have a job due to automation.
One thing I really like about Yang is his desire to have conversations about issues nobody else seems to be thinking about. With regard to UBI, There certainly is a correlation with the need for UBI due to an the job displacement that exists due to AI.

Truck driving is a fine example and the statistics bear it out. For example, we have over 3 million truck drivers, truck driving is the most common job in 29 of 50 states. Average age is 49 with a high school education and 1 year of college. There are an additional 7 million people working in support roles of this industry in truck stops, motels, maintenance, and freight loading/unloading. Studies have shown that when jobs are lost to AI about 40% of those people dont work again, as most of them are only skilled for the work they had been doing for 20+ years already. And it's uncommon for a 49 year old unemployed truck driver, for example, with a 30+ year old high school diploma to learn to code. So we are likely looking at early retirement for a lot of folks,, which also means a loss of tax revenue for uncle sam. And this is just one industry.

So it's certainly a conversation that needs to be had because it'll be a bigger issue that needs to able addressed soon enough. But none of these gumps on the hill want to go there. Another conversation he's trying to have is that about data privacy and our ability to control that. I just want someone in charge who can see the forest through the trees. Lately all the elected leaders have shown us is that they can barely see as far as what's directly in front of them, and that some of them seriously have a substandard level of intelligence.
 

OSU79

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#15
One thing I really like about Yang is his desire to have conversations about issues nobody else seems to be thinking about. With regard to UBI, There certainly is a correlation with the need for UBI due to an the job displacement that exists due to AI.
Edit: thought I'd better start with a tl;dr.
I've argued against Yang's UBI for the past year, now I believe he's just a forward-thinker.

While I was never really sold on the UBI portion of his platform (because I'm a stodgy old guy), I intellectually know it's only a matter of time before something similar will absolutely be necessary. Part of the reason is automation taking over many manual jobs, but the changes coming through AI will dwarf anything we've ever seen from automation. Not in my lifetime, but certainly within the lifetime of my grandkids. As this happens, most wealth will be created by machines, but to have markets for their output there has to be a consuming populace with money to spend, not only for subsistance-level goods but likely even beyond that. At that point it will make sense that whoever controls the means of production (public or private) will want/need to finance their own market generation, which becomes a cost of doing business, just as all taxes are.

It all sounds like science fiction or Brave New World-ish right now, but I look at it like this: in the past 2-3 hundred years we've gone from day-long back-breaking labor for subsistence to 40ish hours/week of mostly mental work that results in wealth that would have been inconceivable to my grandparents. I believe that in the not too distant future there won't be enough work to employ everyone, but everyone has to eat, making some sort of UBI inevitable.
 

Midnight Toker

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Edit: thought I'd better start with a tl;dr.
I've argued against Yang's UBI for the past year, now I believe he's just a forward-thinker.

While I was never really sold on the UBI portion of his platform (because I'm a stodgy old guy), I intellectually know it's only a matter of time before something similar will absolutely be necessary. Part of the reason is automation taking over many manual jobs, but the changes coming through AI will dwarf anything we've ever seen from automation. Not in my lifetime, but certainly within the lifetime of my grandkids. As this happens, most wealth will be created by machines, but to have markets for their output there has to be a consuming populace with money to spend, not only for subsistance-level goods but likely even beyond that. At that point it will make sense that whoever controls the means of production (public or private) will want/need to finance their own market generation, which becomes a cost of doing business, just as all taxes are.

It all sounds like science fiction or Brave New World-ish right now, but I look at it like this: in the past 2-3 hundred years we've gone from day-long back-breaking labor for subsistence to 40ish hours/week of mostly mental work that results in wealth that would have been inconceivable to my grandparents. I believe that in the not too distant future there won't be enough work to employ everyone, but everyone has to eat, making some sort of UBI inevitable.
When i first heard about Yang and his proposals, I scoffed and laughed at it. It was my initial response being a right leaning moderate. But the more i talked to Yang supporters and the more I listened to what he had to say, the more i liked him, the way he thinks, and the more i listening, I really started digging what he had to say. It wasnt long until I, for the first time in my life, actually donated to a political campaign. He was also the first democrat I ever voted for, really the first politician that i was excited to vote for. I think he would be potus today if the dnc did right by him.

I look at automation and AI as being largely correlated as AI makes automation more feasible and more likely to replace a larger number of jobs. i read somewhere that AI and automation will displace 40% of all workers. I am not sure how accurate that is but i do believe it will have a major impact as you do.

You paint a dreary picture but i cant argue against the sentiment of it. Reminds of me this really lovely show I enjoy called the expanse. Earth has colonized the solar system and the people on Mars have full autonomy. Earth has so many people but not nearly enough jobs for everyone, so the people who dont work are on what's called basic. their version of UBI. Meanwhile on Mars, everyone HAS to work because it's Mars and they really have the opposite problem. So the Martians look at Earthers as these lazy phucks do just dont want to work while they have to for survival. it's good!
 

OSU79

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#17
When i first heard about Yang and his proposals, I scoffed and laughed at it. It was my initial response being a right leaning moderate. But the more i talked to Yang supporters and the more I listened to what he had to say, the more i liked him, the way he thinks, and the more i listening, I really started digging what he had to say. It wasnt long until I, for the first time in my life, actually donated to a political campaign. He was also the first democrat I ever voted for, really the first politician that i was excited to vote for. I think he would be potus today if the dnc did right by him.

I look at automation and AI as being largely correlated as AI makes automation more feasible and more likely to replace a larger number of jobs. i read somewhere that AI and automation will displace 40% of all workers. I am not sure how accurate that is but i do believe it will have a major impact as you do.

You paint a dreary picture but i cant argue against the sentiment of it. Reminds of me this really lovely show I enjoy called the expanse. Earth has colonized the solar system and the people on Mars have full autonomy. Earth has so many people but not nearly enough jobs for everyone, so the people who dont work are on what's called basic. their version of UBI. Meanwhile on Mars, everyone HAS to work because it's Mars and they really have the opposite problem. So the Martians look at Earthers as these lazy phucks do just dont want to work while they have to for survival. it's good!
I don't necessarily even view it as dreary - it could still raise the standard of living for all. The free marketer inside me still thinks someone has to get rich(er?)to make it worthwhile to raise the other boats.

I'm on the 5th book of The Expanse. They're really good, but I don't want to watch the TV version until I finish. There are 8 in the main series, plus several short stories. It was odd when I read about their "basic" as it fit so closely with where I believed we're headed, though it is much more dreary than I imagined.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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#18
When i first heard about Yang and his proposals, I scoffed and laughed at it. It was my initial response being a right leaning moderate. But the more i talked to Yang supporters and the more I listened to what he had to say, the more i liked him, the way he thinks, and the more i listening, I really started digging what he had to say. It wasnt long until I, for the first time in my life, actually donated to a political campaign. He was also the first democrat I ever voted for, really the first politician that i was excited to vote for. I think he would be potus today if the dnc did right by him.

I look at automation and AI as being largely correlated as AI makes automation more feasible and more likely to replace a larger number of jobs. i read somewhere that AI and automation will displace 40% of all workers. I am not sure how accurate that is but i do believe it will have a major impact as you do.

You paint a dreary picture but i cant argue against the sentiment of it. Reminds of me this really lovely show I enjoy called the expanse. Earth has colonized the solar system and the people on Mars have full autonomy. Earth has so many people but not nearly enough jobs for everyone, so the people who dont work are on what's called basic. their version of UBI. Meanwhile on Mars, everyone HAS to work because it's Mars and they really have the opposite problem. So the Martians look at Earthers as these lazy phucks do just dont want to work while they have to for survival. it's good!
I don't think he necessarily created a dreary picture, but automation is coming for many current jobs. That said automation will also create a lot of new jobs (network security becomes even more vital), but probably little doubt that the net effect is less jobs. I do think we will see self-driving semi-trucks likely in next 20 years as infrastructure is built to support. And once that occurs you tie that into home delivery services that are built on much more automated engines -- jobs at many stores will migrate and some will vanish.

I am not yet convinced Yang is more than a one-trick pony, but I do appreciate he is at least speaking about a trick that is different than we see from other candidates from both sides of the aisle.

EDIT: I did not intentionally copy the first sentence of @OSU79. Was typing my reply at same time. :)
 

Rack

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#19
Freedom is evolving into free stuff...I sincerely hope Andrew Yang is a good mayor, I really do...Just open it up baby and let the free market take back Manhattan. Couldn't be worse than the current mayor...I don't think that is possible.
 

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Midnight Toker

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#20
I don't necessarily even view it as dreary - it could still raise the standard of living for all. The free marketer inside me still thinks someone has to get rich(er?)to make it worthwhile to raise the other boats.

I'm on the 5th book of The Expanse. They're really good, but I don't want to watch the TV version until I finish. There are 8 in the main series, plus several short stories. It was odd when I read about their "basic" as it fit so closely with where I believed we're headed, though it is much more dreary than I imagined.
I'm the same way too. And you'll love the show!

I don't think he necessarily created a dreary picture, but automation is coming for many current jobs. That said automation will also create a lot of new jobs (network security becomes even more vital), but probably little doubt that the net effect is less jobs. I do think we will see self-driving semi-trucks likely in next 20 years as infrastructure is built to support. And once that occurs you tie that into home delivery services that are built on much more automated engines -- jobs at many stores will migrate and some will vanish.

I am not yet convinced Yang is more than a one-trick pony, but I do appreciate he is at least speaking about a trick that is different than we see from other candidates from both sides of the aisle.

EDIT: I did not intentionally copy the first sentence of @OSU79. Was typing my reply at same time. :)
It's hard to really predict the true effect of this issue, because it'll get exponentially more intelligent and more capable of duplicating human labor. In some ways it'll be awesome but yeah, jobs. More ingenuities thinking will have to take place to address it. UBI is one. But the conversation doesnt get had if the right people arent trying to have it.

As far s one trick pony goes, this is more of a sort of foundation of his greater effort to create what he calls human centered capitalism. And this is one initiative. One thing he cares about. There's where he is on other issues like our data privacy, where he stands on election and campaign finance reform. There's a whole philosophy that i find appealing that drives what he's about. Not left, not right, forward. I like that pragmatic way of thinking. I hope he does great thing in nyc