And you thought it was Trump.....

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Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
53,512
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#46
https://twitter.com/CREWcrew/status/1356575227812208640
Given their net worth is over an estimated $1B. Sounds like their investments may have taken a hit.

Jared's family business, the Kushner Companies, owns and operates approximately $7 billion worth of real estate assets around the country.

It's not like he's a deadbeat father crackhead making $100,000/month for a business he knows nothing about.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
53,512
17,983
1,743
#47
Richest US Presidents.

The figures in the table below are all derived from 24/7 Wall St.'s 2016 valuation of each president's peak net worth. For purposes of 24/7 Wall St.'s valuation, a president's peak net worth may occur after that president has left office. To allow for a direct comparison, all of the figures have been adjusted for inflation to 2016 U.S. dollars.

Donald Trump -- $ 4,500,000,000
George Washington -- $ 587,000,000
Thomas Jefferson -- $ 236,000,000
Theodore Roosevelt -- $ 139,000,000
Andrew Jackson -- $ 132,000,000
James Madison -- $ 113,000,000
Lyndon B. Johnson -- $ 109,000,000
Herbert Hoover -- $ 83,000,000
Bill Clinton -- $ 75,000,000
Franklin D. Roosevelt -- $ 66,000,000
John Tyler -- $ 57,000,000
Barack Obama -- $ 40,000,000
George W. Bush -- $ 39,000,000

Source: Wiki

I'm curious which ones made their money after they left political office?

Donald Trump of course just left office.

George Washington. The nation's first president benefited mightily from the same Virginia planting tradition as Madison and Jefferson did. More than 300 slaves worked his massive 7,000-acre plantation, Mount Vernon. Washington's holdings expanded to include land parcels in the Ohio Valley, New York, and the District of Columbia, in addition to other investments. However, also like Madison and Jefferson, Washington is remembered today for his immense contribution to the Union, as opposed to his personal fortune.

Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson inherited the land on which be built his Virginia plantation, Monticello, which provided a vast fortune for the third president. Totaling over 5,000 acres, Monticello is known best today for its architectural splendor. However, as with Madison, heavy debts plagued Jefferson later in life, forcing his family to eventually sell the estate in the years following the great statesman's passing.

Theodore Roosevelt. Like his distant cousin FDR, Teddy Roosevelt hailed from the prominent New York family and inherited the vast majority of his wealth. Unlike his businessman father, whom he idolized, Teddy was never interested in the mere making of money. Rather, he lived off the money he came into after his father's death and entered politics at an early age, eventually becoming one of the most celebrated presidents in U.S. history.

Andrew Jackson. The hero of the Battle of New Orleans, the seventh president also gained considerable wealth through his ownership of the Hermitage plantation in Tennessee, from 1804 until his death in 1845. Though he engaged in other ventures over his lifetime, the majority of his wealth came from the cotton produced at the Hermitage, which was farmed by a growing number of slaves that eventually totaled several hundred.

James Madison. Like many early presidents, Madison derived the majority of his wealth from his extensive land holdings. Yet even though he was said to be the largest landowner in Virginia's Orange County during his lifetime, Madison left the presidency poorer than when he entered it. Late in his life, declining tobacco prices and mismanagement by relatives placed an acute financial strain on the Founding Father. Madison and his wife, Dolley, gradually sold off their slave and land holdings from their Montpelier plantation.

Lyndon B. Johnson. The majority of his wealth came from his wife, Claudia, popularly known as Lady Bird. Historians have noted that Johnson almost certainly leveraged his political influence to aid his family's business interests, especially when he lobbied the FCC as a U.S. senator to grant exclusive broadcast rights to the Austin area to his family's TV holdings.

Herbert Hoover. The 31st president made the bulk of his fortune as a mining executive. After graduating in Stanford University's inaugural class with a degree in geology, Hoover climbed the ranks of various mining corporations in locations as diverse as California, Western Australia, and China. Helping found a company that would eventually become part of the publicly traded Rio Tinto Group, Hoover reportedly came to control mining operations on six continents, resulting in an immense fortune before the onset of the First World War and his eventual entry into political life.

Bill Clinton, who was younger than the average president at his inauguration, has amassed the bulk of his personal and family fortune since leaving the Oval Office at age 54. After returning to private life, Clinton has earned huge sums from book deals and public speaking engagements. He reportedly received a $15 million advance for his memoir My Life, and his booking fee as a public speaker sits well into six figures.

https://www.fool.com/investing/2016/11/20/the-10-richest-us-presidents.aspx

Seems like Bill Clinton figured out another way to make his wealth.....
 

cowboyinexile

Have some class
A/V Subscriber
Jun 29, 2004
18,916
10,959
1,743
41
Fairmont, MN
#49
Richest US Presidents.

The figures in the table below are all derived from 24/7 Wall St.'s 2016 valuation of each president's peak net worth. For purposes of 24/7 Wall St.'s valuation, a president's peak net worth may occur after that president has left office. To allow for a direct comparison, all of the figures have been adjusted for inflation to 2016 U.S. dollars.

Donald Trump -- $ 4,500,000,000
George Washington -- $ 587,000,000
Thomas Jefferson -- $ 236,000,000
Theodore Roosevelt -- $ 139,000,000
Andrew Jackson -- $ 132,000,000
James Madison -- $ 113,000,000
Lyndon B. Johnson -- $ 109,000,000
Herbert Hoover -- $ 83,000,000
Bill Clinton -- $ 75,000,000
Franklin D. Roosevelt -- $ 66,000,000
John Tyler -- $ 57,000,000
Barack Obama -- $ 40,000,000
George W. Bush -- $ 39,000,000

Source: Wiki

I'm curious which ones made their money after they left political office?

Donald Trump of course just left office.

George Washington. The nation's first president benefited mightily from the same Virginia planting tradition as Madison and Jefferson did. More than 300 slaves worked his massive 7,000-acre plantation, Mount Vernon. Washington's holdings expanded to include land parcels in the Ohio Valley, New York, and the District of Columbia, in addition to other investments. However, also like Madison and Jefferson, Washington is remembered today for his immense contribution to the Union, as opposed to his personal fortune.

Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson inherited the land on which be built his Virginia plantation, Monticello, which provided a vast fortune for the third president. Totaling over 5,000 acres, Monticello is known best today for its architectural splendor. However, as with Madison, heavy debts plagued Jefferson later in life, forcing his family to eventually sell the estate in the years following the great statesman's passing.

Theodore Roosevelt. Like his distant cousin FDR, Teddy Roosevelt hailed from the prominent New York family and inherited the vast majority of his wealth. Unlike his businessman father, whom he idolized, Teddy was never interested in the mere making of money. Rather, he lived off the money he came into after his father's death and entered politics at an early age, eventually becoming one of the most celebrated presidents in U.S. history.

Andrew Jackson. The hero of the Battle of New Orleans, the seventh president also gained considerable wealth through his ownership of the Hermitage plantation in Tennessee, from 1804 until his death in 1845. Though he engaged in other ventures over his lifetime, the majority of his wealth came from the cotton produced at the Hermitage, which was farmed by a growing number of slaves that eventually totaled several hundred.

James Madison. Like many early presidents, Madison derived the majority of his wealth from his extensive land holdings. Yet even though he was said to be the largest landowner in Virginia's Orange County during his lifetime, Madison left the presidency poorer than when he entered it. Late in his life, declining tobacco prices and mismanagement by relatives placed an acute financial strain on the Founding Father. Madison and his wife, Dolley, gradually sold off their slave and land holdings from their Montpelier plantation.

Lyndon B. Johnson. The majority of his wealth came from his wife, Claudia, popularly known as Lady Bird. Historians have noted that Johnson almost certainly leveraged his political influence to aid his family's business interests, especially when he lobbied the FCC as a U.S. senator to grant exclusive broadcast rights to the Austin area to his family's TV holdings.

Herbert Hoover. The 31st president made the bulk of his fortune as a mining executive. After graduating in Stanford University's inaugural class with a degree in geology, Hoover climbed the ranks of various mining corporations in locations as diverse as California, Western Australia, and China. Helping found a company that would eventually become part of the publicly traded Rio Tinto Group, Hoover reportedly came to control mining operations on six continents, resulting in an immense fortune before the onset of the First World War and his eventual entry into political life.

Bill Clinton, who was younger than the average president at his inauguration, has amassed the bulk of his personal and family fortune since leaving the Oval Office at age 54. After returning to private life, Clinton has earned huge sums from book deals and public speaking engagements. He reportedly received a $15 million advance for his memoir My Life, and his booking fee as a public speaker sits well into six figures.

https://www.fool.com/investing/2016/11/20/the-10-richest-us-presidents.aspx

Seems like Bill Clinton figured out another way to make his wealth.....
Your comment on Clinton is weird. He made a lot of money on books and speaking engagements after his time in office. So did Bush and Obama.

You gave a pass to Kush for profiting off his FIL being president.

Why is it ok for Trump insiders to profit off his Administration yet when traditional Republicans or Democrats do the same you have an issue? Are you a fiscal conservative or a trunpkin?
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
53,512
17,983
1,743
#51
Your comment on Clinton is weird. He made a lot of money on books and speaking engagements after his time in office. So did Bush and Obama.

You gave a pass to Kush for profiting off his FIL being president.

Why is it ok for Trump insiders to profit off his Administration yet when traditional Republicans or Democrats do the same you have an issue? Are you a fiscal conservative or a trunpkin?
I didn't give a pass to anyone. I only pointed out that Kushner was making that kind of money before entering politics.
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
34,047
10,560
1,743
Stupid about AGW!!
#56
When your too far out there for NewsMax and the anchor walks away during your interview...you might have drank a little too much koolaid

https://twitter.com/Newsweek/status/1357068338262908931