Wuhan Coronavirus

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wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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Javits Center, comfort ship Mercy, for starters.

Mandating that those patients be returned to environments housing the absolutely most vulnerable was heavy handed & stupid.
Neither of those seem like they would be able to care for someone who needs around the clock care.

Mercy left NY on April 30th. It was originally supposed to be used as overflow on non Covid patients.

Javits didn't have the ICU beds, operating rooms, or equipment necessary to handle patients who might relapse or need surgery because of an underlying condition. They also had a shortage of PPE.

Also, who would be paying for this? Given the patient in question had already paid for a room at a nursing home?
You also need to take into consideration that there were probably plenty of beds in the hospital that weren't ICU beds that could still have been used for them at one of the hospitals around.

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wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
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So the only option that is absolutely not an option. That one is the one he picks??
Sounds like you want a nursing home to be able kick someone out who has paid because they got sick? You also want the government to socialize the response required?
okay maybe you're misunderstanding what's going on here nobody's advocating for the nursing homes to have kicked them out and never allowed them back. These patients were still recovering as in they were still sick they just didn't need hospitalization or ICU access at that time. You are basically putting patients who are contagious into a building with people who are one of the highest at-risk groups to get it.

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Jul 25, 2018
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OK, so then we must deny people with these then right?
rhinovirus
Salmonella
E Coli
Strep
MRSA
SARS
NoroVirus
Tuberculosis
Influenza

A lot of these are just as deadly and cause outbreaks and deaths in nursing homes all the time. Better have a government provided place for all these recovered patients too.

I'll get to work on calling all these diseases overblown. Then simultaneously act like they are huge deals when it helps my world view.
You're talking in circles now.

You support the state mandating those patients being introduced into the most vulnerable segment of society.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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But they weren't fully recovered. He forced them to take them back when they were still sick/testing positive..

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/loc...patients-requires-more-staff-testing/2410533/
There's also the flip-side of that coin, and that is, even if they were truly "recovered", we don't know yet what that means. Put them back into the nursing home meant re-exposing them. But, maybe in New York and New Jersey there were no good options.

You can't just put them in a regular hospital room, that is if they aren't completely recovered. They need to be in respiratory isolation, which means a negative pressure room. There would be limited numbers of those in the hospital.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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https://denver.cbslocal.com/2020/05...enver-sorting-facility-mail-colorado-wyoming/

DENVER (CBS4) — A U.S. Postal Service facility in Denver is refusing orders to shut down after the health department reported multiple COVID-19 cases among employees. The massive sorting facility at 53rd and Quebec handles mail for all of Colorado and Wyoming.


“…the USPS not only failed to provide the necessary information, but they have not allowed inspections to support complete outbreak investigations,” DDPHE officials stated.
RELATED: Coronavirus In Colorado: Postal Worker Accuses USPS Of Negligence
“It certainly is not our intent to halt the delivery of mail or shut down an essential federal facility,” officials stated. “This was a measure of last resort, and the only remaining tool we have to get the facility management’s attention and secure public health compliance during a pandemic.”
USPS officials argues the facility provides an essential service.

“The Postal Service is an entity of the Federal Government, and the provision of postal services to the American people is designated as an essential function under federal law during times of emergency,” USPS officials stated.

“This closure… has the potential to impact stimulus checks, prescription medications, personal correspondence, and vital goods delivered to the more than 6.5 million customers who live in Colorado and Wyoming.”
Additionally, the postal service says is is meeting all CDC and federal guidelines for COVID-19.
RELATED: U.S. Postal Service Shows How It’s Protecting Customers and Workers
 

NotOnTV

BRB -- Taking an okie leak
Sep 14, 2010
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okay maybe you're misunderstanding what's going on here nobody's advocating for the nursing homes to have kicked them out and never allowed them back. These patients were still recovering as in they were still sick they just didn't need hospitalization or ICU access at that time. You are basically putting patients who are contagious into a building with people who are one of the highest at-risk groups to get it.

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What is so hard for some people to understand about "still shedding the virus, still contagious"?
 
Feb 7, 2007
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okay maybe you're misunderstanding what's going on here nobody's advocating for the nursing homes to have kicked them out and never allowed them back. These patients were still recovering as in they were still sick they just didn't need hospitalization or ICU access at that time. You are basically putting patients who are contagious into a building with people who are one of the highest at-risk groups to get it.

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Gotcha forced quarantine in a hospital. Sounds very cheap. Can we supply the bankruptcy paperwork for them too? You guys complain about government shutdowns but are ok with the government making people pay thousands to stay in a hospital?

I get it is not ideal but NY had a huge number of people sick at once and it called for desparate measures.

They had that policy in place for like 10 days while things were insane. You guys are armchair QBing and still coming up with ideas that don't work in the real world.

Not like NY is the only state with outbreaks of COVID at nursing homes. It was everywhere in NY too. Inevitably every facility was going to be exposed. I mean that is where they came from sick in the first place. Let's see the numbers before and after this policy. Are there any?

PPE supplies and testing would have done more to save lives than these policies cost IMO.
 

NotOnTV

BRB -- Taking an okie leak
Sep 14, 2010
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Gotcha forced quarantine in a hospital. Sounds very cheap. Can we supply the bankruptcy paperwork for them too? You guys complain about government shutdowns but are ok with the government making people pay thousands to stay in a hospital?

I get it is not ideal but NY had a huge number of people sick at once and it called for desparate measures.

They had that policy in place for like 10 days while things were insane. You guys are armchair QBing and still coming up with ideas that don't work in the real world.

Not like NY is the only state with outbreaks of COVID at nursing homes. It was everywhere in NY too. Inevitably every facility was going to be exposed. I mean that is where they came from sick in the first place. Let's see the numbers before and after this policy. Are there any?

PPE supplies and testing would have done more to save lives than these policies cost IMO.
WOW!
 

wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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But they weren't fully recovered. He forced them to take them back when they were still sick/testing positive..

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/loc...patients-requires-more-staff-testing/2410533/
There's also the flip-side of that coin, and that is, even if they were truly "recovered", we don't know yet what that means. Put them back into the nursing home meant re-exposing them. But, maybe in New York and New Jersey there were no good options.

You can't just put them in a regular hospital room, that is if they aren't completely recovered. They need to be in respiratory isolation, which means a negative pressure room. There would be limited numbers of those in the hospital.
so suddenly all these hospitals that were able to open up what they called covid wings just somehow were able to convert all those extra beds into negative pressure rooms with no problem?

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wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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okay maybe you're misunderstanding what's going on here nobody's advocating for the nursing homes to have kicked them out and never allowed them back. These patients were still recovering as in they were still sick they just didn't need hospitalization or ICU access at that time. You are basically putting patients who are contagious into a building with people who are one of the highest at-risk groups to get it.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
Gotcha forced quarantine in a hospital. Sounds very cheap. Can we supply the bankruptcy paperwork for them too? You guys complain about government shutdowns but are ok with the government making people pay thousands to stay in a hospital?

I get it is not ideal but NY had a huge number of people sick at once and it called for desparate measures.

They had that policy in place for like 10 days while things were insane. You guys are armchair QBing and still coming up with ideas that don't work in the real world.

Not like NY is the only state with outbreaks of COVID at nursing homes. It was everywhere in NY too. Inevitably every facility was going to be exposed. I mean that is where they came from sick in the first place. Let's see the numbers before and after this policy. Are there any?

PPE supplies and testing would have done more to save lives than these policies cost IMO.
I'm not sure that these patients were all originally from nursing homes. unless I'm reading it wrong I thought they had patients that just needed to finish recovering and they stuck them in the nursing home instead of letting them go home.

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May 4, 2011
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I'm not sure that these patients were all originally from nursing homes. unless I'm reading it wrong I thought they had patients that just needed to finish recovering and they stuck them in the nursing home instead of letting them go home.

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You are reading it wrong. These were almost exclusively nursing home residents who then got hospitalized and NY said their original nursing homes couldn't deny the resident the spot they already had before. I'm not saying I agree with the policy, but it's a tough choice when hospitals are at or near capacity.
 

Jostate

CPTNQUIRK called me a greenhorn
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You are reading it wrong. These were almost exclusively nursing home residents who then got hospitalized and NY said their original nursing homes couldn't deny the resident the spot they already had before. I'm not saying I agree with the policy, but it's a tough choice when hospitals are at or near capacity.
But I thought they really weren't so full? We anticipated the overrun but it never really happened. Plus in NY, we had that ship and the temporary hospitals we never really utilized.