Vet School in Trouble?

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OSU79

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#2
So they're going to fix their budget by admitting more students. Unfortunately there are plenty of vets already out there, and soon to be many more. It's an expensive doctorate for jobs with mediocre beginning pay.
 
May 21, 2007
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#4
My relative is vet and a recent graduate of OSU vet school. Overall and i think fairly recently, the OSU vet school isn't as highly regarded as some of other schools in the region (Missouri, K-State, A&M). He had work his behind off to overcome OSU's less than stellar reputation and degree to get to where he is at now. That statement is going to offend people personally but its just the truth.

He had an opportunity to teach at OSU but declined due to pay and opportunities. All of the top vets work on the coasts (east and west) because that is where people will pay to keep there animal in great shape. So it is not surprising that the school is going downhill. There is no money in Oklahoma.

Billy Bob from Broken Bow isn't going pay $1,200 for an operation. They are going to pay nothing and let the pet die, $60 to put it down or .25 cents for the bullet. So yes, the fly over states are saturated with vets.

Another interesting fact, most vet hospitals are owned by a small number of equity groups. When hospital acquisitions are made anti-trust restrictions are quite frequent meaning that most hospitals are part of larger entities.

Anyways, letting in more dummies and charging them more isn't going to help this problem.
 

Cimarron

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#5
So they're going to fix their budget by admitting more students. Unfortunately there are plenty of vets already out there, and soon to be many more. It's an expensive doctorate for jobs with mediocre beginning pay.
There is a serious shortage of large animal veternarians.
 

OSU79

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#6
There is a serious shortage of large animal veternarians.

I believe that - 20 years ago, before he retired, my father-in-law was one of the few vets in our area still doing large animal. It's incredible how physically taxing large animal practice is, especially considering how poorly it pays relative to small animal practice. Even as much as he loved doing large animal, at the end probably 75% of his volume was small animal - necessary to pay the bills.
 
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#7
There is a serious shortage of large animal veternarians.
Several years ago a young woman from here was admitted to the vet school and in the announcement in our local newspaper it mentioned that 75% of the incoming students were women. I thought at the time that not very many of those girls were going to be large animal vets.
 

Cimarron

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#8
Several years ago a young woman from here was admitted to the vet school and in the announcement in our local newspaper it mentioned that 75% of the incoming students were women. I thought at the time that not very many of those girls were going to be large animal vets.
Just like all the rest of the students. I wouldn't be surprised that more girls than boys might be interested in large animal, esp horses.

Additionally, it's been reported for example that women working in farrowing barns will wean more pigs than men.
 

El Gato Bandito

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#9
My relative is vet and a recent graduate of OSU vet school. Overall and i think fairly recently, the OSU vet school isn't as highly regarded as some of other schools in the region (Missouri, K-State, A&M). He had work his behind off to overcome OSU's less than stellar reputation and degree to get to where he is at now. That statement is going to offend people personally but its just the truth.

He had an opportunity to teach at OSU but declined due to pay and opportunities. All of the top vets work on the coasts (east and west) because that is where people will pay to keep there animal in great shape. So it is not surprising that the school is going downhill. There is no money in Oklahoma.

Billy Bob from Broken Bow isn't going pay $1,200 for an operation. They are going to pay nothing and let the pet die, $60 to put it down or .25 cents for the bullet. So yes, the fly over states are saturated with vets.

Another interesting fact, most vet hospitals are owned by a small number of equity groups. When hospital acquisitions are made anti-trust restrictions are quite frequent meaning that most hospitals are part of larger entities.

Anyways, letting in more dummies and charging them more isn't going to help this problem.
That's interesting because I've always been led to believe that our vet school had a shining reputation for being one of the very best in the region/country along with Texas A&M.

I guess people round here are just drinking too much of the orange kool aid.
 

Cimarron

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Jun 28, 2007
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#10
My relative is vet and a recent graduate of OSU vet school. Overall and i think fairly recently, the OSU vet school isn't as highly regarded as some of other schools in the region (Missouri, K-State, A&M). He had work his behind off to overcome OSU's less than stellar reputation and degree to get to where he is at now. That statement is going to offend people personally but its just the truth.

He had an opportunity to teach at OSU but declined due to pay and opportunities. All of the top vets work on the coasts (east and west) because that is where people will pay to keep there animal in great shape. So it is not surprising that the school is going downhill. There is no money in Oklahoma.

Billy Bob from Broken Bow isn't going pay $1,200 for an operation. They are going to pay nothing and let the pet die, $60 to put it down or .25 cents for the bullet. So yes, the fly over states are saturated with vets.

Another interesting fact, most vet hospitals are owned by a small number of equity groups. When hospital acquisitions are made anti-trust restrictions are quite frequent meaning that most hospitals are part of larger entities.

Anyways, letting in more dummies and charging them more isn't going to help this problem.
The "fly over states" are not saturated with vets, there is a shortage of vets especially in regards to large animal veternarians. The issue is that a veternarian can make much better money catering to the "pet" owner rather than livestock where you are trying to make a living raising livestock. I don't know the answer to this issue.

But here is an example of one of the problems.

A student goes through the Animal Science Department at one of our land grant univesities around the country. They take usually two classes in nutrition, genetics, production, reproduction and very often will also take a class in A.I. and/or palpation (pregnancy check). Many times these classes are the same or very similar classes to what a vet student would take and often probably the same instructor.

Yet in many states it is illegal for an Animal Scientist to hire out for pregnancy determination of beef cattle. I know of a situation where an extension agent was going to do a producer palpation course and the state vet office had it cancelled. The reason was it was taking jobs away from veternarians.

We need veternarians in rural areas to service the needs of the industry. We also need to allow Animal Scientists to do the jobs for which they were trained, this is becoming increasingly difficult with some of the regulations coming down. All of this drives up the cost of production and hence the cost of food on the retail counter. Ultimitely it forces production agriculture into larger production units to maintain profitability. There is a reason farms and ranches are getting larger, its finances. The issue of animal health and care costs is part of it.

side note:

According to an APPA survey, dog-owners spent an average of $235 on routine vet visits in 2015, cat-owners $196. Much of this routine care can be accomplished at a much cheaper cost by the pet owner at home and was in the past.
 

jakeman

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#11
There is a serious shortage of large animal veternarians.
I haven't noticed that. Lots of large animal vets where I am. My guy invented a vaccine and moved to the NW cause that's where he always wanted to live and now he's filthy rich and can. He gave his clients a full page list of equine vets in this immediate area to choose from as replacements that were accepting clients. I chose the closest guy to me, about 10 minutes away, and I don't ever have to make an appointment to get one of my nags seen.

He's an oSu guy and I see an oSu trailer there from time to time.

As to choosing to have a $1200 treatment/operation done on a pet, I believe if it's a viable option and has a good chance of being successful, then a small animal vet, should discuss that, but if the client chooses not to have it done, for financial or other reasons, I don't think the vet or his staff should try to shame the owner into having the procedure. That's the issue I have with a lot of young vets.
 

CPTNQUIRK

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#12
The "fly over states" are not saturated with vets, there is a shortage of vets especially in regards to large animal veternarians. The issue is that a veternarian can make much better money catering to the "pet" owner rather than livestock where you are trying to make a living raising livestock. I don't know the answer to this issue.

But here is an example of one of the problems.

A student goes through the Animal Science Department at one of our land grant univesities around the country. They take usually two classes in nutrition, genetics, production, reproduction and very often will also take a class in A.I. and/or palpation (pregnancy check). Many times these classes are the same or very similar classes to what a vet student would take and often probably the same instructor.

Yet in many states it is illegal for an Animal Scientist to hire out for pregnancy determination of beef cattle. I know of a situation where an extension agent was going to do a producer palpation course and the state vet office had it cancelled. The reason was it was taking jobs away from veternarians.

We need veternarians in rural areas to service the needs of the industry. We also need to allow Animal Scientists to do the jobs for which they were trained, this is becoming increasingly difficult with some of the regulations coming down. All of this drives up the cost of production and hence the cost of food on the retail counter. Ultimitely it forces production agriculture into larger production units to maintain profitability. There is a reason farms and ranches are getting larger, its finances. The issue of animal health and care costs is part of it.

side note:

According to an APPA survey, dog-owners spent an average of $235 on routine vet visits in 2015, cat-owners $196. Much of this routine care can be accomplished at a much cheaper cost by the pet owner at home and was in the past.
From what you are saying, it seems like there needs to be a registered Vet Assistant comparable to a Physician Assistant or a Nurse Practitioner That can do some of the jobs that a vet would normally do, especially for large animals.
 

Cimarron

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#13
From what you are saying, it seems like there needs to be a registered Vet Assistant comparable to a Physician Assistant or a Nurse Practitioner That can do some of the jobs that a vet would normally do, especially for large animals.
Why isn’t it legal for someone with a degree in animal science to legally call animals pregnant? As I’ve said many have had the same classes as a veterinarian. They can legally prey check their own cows but not for a client.