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Feb 25, 2008
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Here the problem causing the long lines in my opinion - they separated the democrats from the republicans into separate voting lines.

https://www.chron.com/news/houston-...ep-into-the-night-15103506.php#photo-19125152

Democratic County Clerk Diane Trautman and her staff said each of the county’s 401 polling places started with between 16 and 48 machines, depending on anticipated turnout, but at each location the machines were divided equally between the Democrat and Republican primaries, regardless of whether the location heavily favored one party or the other.

“If we had given one five and one 10, and that other one had a line, they would say, ‘You slighted us,’” Trautman said late Tuesday. “So we wanted to be fair and equal and start at the same amount. Through the day, we have been sending out additional machines to the Democratic judges to the extent that we ran out.”

During Election Day the clerk’s office dispatched 68 extra voting machines to Democratic polls, including 14 to TSU, in response to election judges’ requests. Trautman added that some of the machines assigned to TSU to start the day had to be replaced after malfunctioning.

Trautman said a joint primary — which would have allowed both parties’ ballots to be loaded on each voting machine, rather than separating the equipment by party — would have reduced the lines, but the GOP rejected the idea.

“That would be just one line, there’s not a line for each party, so all the voters can use all the machines,” she said. “That would really have expedited this whole thing. I’ll be pushing that for next time.”

County GOP chair Paul Simpson disagreed, saying he rejected that approach in part because he did not want his voters waiting in long lines created by the contested Democratic presidential primary.
 

jakeman

Unhinged Idiot
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Apr 4, 2005
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If all of this is true, there simply would not be long lines. 8 people do not make a long line. Show me wealthy white women with their Prada purses quietly waiting in line in Oak Lawn without complaint instead of poor people and students and then I will agree. Easy to call people losers when you aren't the loser.
I doubt wealthy white people with Prada purses in Oak Lawn raise a stink when they have to wait in line. Nobody would take a picture of that, because it is a non issue to have to wait in lines to vote in hotly contested races.


I've had my ass kicked numerous times, on lots of topics and other things. It never caused me to cry.

The sun don't shine on the same dog's ass everyday. I know this so I don't have a melt down when I don't get everything I want, when I want it.

Life don't always go the way we would like it. Life don't give a shit.
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
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We can finally stop being inundated with Bloomberg ads and start getting inundated with Joe Biden ads paid for by Mike Bloomberg!
Yep, and I'm sure Bloomberg will want nothing in return for dropping a billion dollars getting Biden elected. Regardless of what Biden says, just assume his views in office will mimick Bloomberg's.
 

sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
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Oct 18, 2006
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Here the problem causing the long lines in my opinion - they separated the democrats from the republicans into separate voting lines.

https://www.chron.com/news/houston-...ep-into-the-night-15103506.php#photo-19125152

Democratic County Clerk Diane Trautman and her staff said each of the county’s 401 polling places started with between 16 and 48 machines, depending on anticipated turnout, but at each location the machines were divided equally between the Democrat and Republican primaries, regardless of whether the location heavily favored one party or the other.

“If we had given one five and one 10, and that other one had a line, they would say, ‘You slighted us,’” Trautman said late Tuesday. “So we wanted to be fair and equal and start at the same amount. Through the day, we have been sending out additional machines to the Democratic judges to the extent that we ran out.”

During Election Day the clerk’s office dispatched 68 extra voting machines to Democratic polls, including 14 to TSU, in response to election judges’ requests. Trautman added that some of the machines assigned to TSU to start the day had to be replaced after malfunctioning.

Trautman said a joint primary — which would have allowed both parties’ ballots to be loaded on each voting machine, rather than separating the equipment by party — would have reduced the lines, but the GOP rejected the idea.

“That would be just one line, there’s not a line for each party, so all the voters can use all the machines,” she said. “That would really have expedited this whole thing. I’ll be pushing that for next time.”

County GOP chair Paul Simpson disagreed, saying he rejected that approach in part because he did not want his voters waiting in long lines created by the contested Democratic presidential primary.

I heard this on local Houston NPR affiliate this morning. GOP didn't want their voters to have to wait, and Dem Party Chair was just confused. Relevant quote below. And my description two sentences ago, was how the local NPR affiliate described it.

County Democratic Party chair Lillie Schechter said her staff did not grasp until Tuesday that when Trautman spoke of allocating the machines “equitably” she meant dividing them equally at each polling site, rather than giving each party the same number of machines but concentrating most of them in areas known to be strongholds of each party.
 

wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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More to it than just numbers. Most closed sites were redundant sites in metro areas which have increased black and latino residents at an exponentially greater rate than the burbs and rural areas. You might have to go 1 mile to a center instead of 1/2 a mile. Big deal. There is nowhere in the state where someone can not easily get to to vote.
Why are there long lines if those are redundant sites? Seems if everyone is waiting in line in those areas, the word "redundant" is wrong as distance isn't the issue. High population density needs more sites so that people have equal access to a critical constitutional requirement.

Some small towns have one coffee shop. Some city blocks have four. That isn't redundant, that is serving populations.

I agree with you, there is definitely more to this than numbers.
The true answer to this is the "overwhelming" turnout encouraged by Bernie and others. The word means 'more than expected'. This means that the high turnout is abnormal. Large populations don't mean large turnout or even large registration numbers. You'd have to honestly look at the registrations/turnout for the last few elections in those areas where the polling place were closed to know the true story.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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Google it & "research" it the same way you did with the selected facts you chose to present. You know, the other side of the story?
Weak attempt. I post data. You post opinion then tell me to go prove your opinion wrong. No thanks, you guys are delusional anyway and nothing would change your mind since this does not affect you personally other than to advantage your politicians. If my facts are selective then show me the other facts I am missing. Or, consider your opinion is based on what you want not what you know.

I already said if any of you could show that the closures were equally dispursed to insure that poll access was equal then I would jump on the bandwagon and tell them to quit complaining. But, LOL at your idea that I am going to google your point for you and return with data to support it for you. You want me to wash your car while I am at it, too?
But see, it shouldn't be a "your point, my point" situation. You thought something was wrong and googled and found one article with number of places closed and population numbers and then quit researching because it backed up your bias. You didn't bother to research further to inform yourself.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

SLVRBK

Johnny 8ball's PR Manager
Staff
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Oct 16, 2003
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I heard this on local Houston NPR affiliate this morning. GOP didn't want their voters to have to wait, and Dem Party Chair was just confused. Relevant quote below. And my description two sentences ago, was how the local NPR affiliate described it.
The Harris County GOP Chair actually suggested to the County Clerk to put more "Dem" machines in the heavily Dem precincts but she refused. Harris County Dem voter turnout was 44% higher in this primary than in 2016 primary.
 

SLVRBK

Johnny 8ball's PR Manager
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I don't think the complaint is about the idea of waiting in general, the complaint is about the fact that they are waiting because Texas has closed 750 voting sites since 2012 which is why.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/po...sed-more-polling-places-than-any-14429443.php

And, if you believe the Guardian, here is the why of that:
The analysis finds that the 50 counties that gained the most Black and Latinx residents between 2012 and 2018 closed 542 polling sites, compared to just 34 closures in the 50 counties that have gained the fewest black and Latinx residents. This is despite the fact that the population in the former group of counties has risen by 2.5 million people, whereas in the latter category the total population has fallen by over 13,000.
First, the State of Texas didn't close the voting locations, that is a decision left to the counties and the counties can only close locations if they are opening larger "voter centers".
Second, part of the decision to close polling locations is shortage of election judges which is a national problem.

Quoting from the story you posted (she is a Democrat elected in 2016):
Harris County Clerk Diane Trautman, who has made establishing the centers a top priority since taking office in January, has said they make voting easier, as residents can more cast ballots near work or school.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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First, the State of Texas didn't close the voting locations, that is a decision left to the counties and the counties can only close locations if they are opening larger "voter centers".
Second, part of the decision to close polling locations is shortage of election judges which is a national problem.

Quoting from the story you posted (she is a Democrat elected in 2016):
Harris County Clerk Diane Trautman, who has made establishing the centers a top priority since taking office in January, has said they make voting easier, as residents can more cast ballots near work or school.
Uh, hello!!! You're ruining the narrative here!!