Tucker Carlson: The rise of automation

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Donnyboy

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#61
Considering that it's NOT going to stop...How do we tweak it to meet our needs is a better thing to ask and address as that is the more likely model.
It has to. There will be zero need for humans other than social interactions (which some will choose AI) and reproduction.

There isn't a solution other than stopping it as at some point a machine will be made that is superior in every way to humans.
 

CTeamPoke

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#63
It has to. There will be zero need for humans other than social interactions (which some will choose AI) and reproduction.

There isn't a solution other than stopping it as at some point a machine will be made that is superior in every way to humans.
A wise man once said "when you reach the edge of a cliff, is it still progress to take a step forward?"
 

steross

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#64
Considering that it's NOT going to stop...How do we tweak it to meet our needs is a better thing to ask and address as that is the more likely model.
By realizing that manual labor is not going to be available as a job to any significant degree. Repetitive tasks that are not manual will also be gone. Creating and caring/nurturing etc will be the primary fields that will remain human. We need to refocus our methods of valuing to reward that instead of turning a wrench, lifting a bucket, or driving a vehicle.
 
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oks10

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#66
Have any of you ever watched Electric Dreams on Amazon Video? Some of the episodes are a bit of a mind trip but there's one kind of related to this. You should check it out if you haven't. Episode 8: Autofac. (But really they're all pretty entertaining watches. I'm not kidding about the mind trip though. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED. lol)
 

Bowers2

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#67
I honestly believe the AI threat to be completely overblown. Some of you sound like climate change alarmists. The answer is always somewhere in the middle. Jobs will be lost, jobs will be created. We’ll learn to adapt.
 
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#68
I honestly believe the AI threat to be completely overblown. Some of you sound like climate change alarmists. The answer is always somewhere in the middle. Jobs will be lost, jobs will be created. We’ll learn to adapt.
& there are a ton of jobs that will not be replaced by automation as soon as is being predicted.
 

StillwaterTownie

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#69
I honestly believe the AI threat to be completely overblown. Some of you sound like climate change alarmists. The answer is always somewhere in the middle. Jobs will be lost, jobs will be created. We’ll learn to adapt.
The middle will be found when so many people get laid off by advanced automation that sales of what it produces go downhill, due to lack of people with enough money to buy.

There is a big modern day difference to what is going on now and for the future. Back when tractors replaced horses, it didn't come with a promise that the tractor could automatically plow fields on its own.
 

CTeamPoke

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#71
I honestly believe the AI threat to be completely overblown. Some of you sound like climate change alarmists. The answer is always somewhere in the middle. Jobs will be lost, jobs will be created. We’ll learn to adapt.
The difference between the AI threat and the climate change threat is that the people enabling automation will make a TON of money off of it and keep it at the top... which has been what our country is all about for the last 50 years. Decimating the middle.
 

Bowers2

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#72
The difference between the AI threat and the climate change threat is that the people enabling automation will make a TON of money off of it and keep it at the top... which has been what our country is all about for the last 50 years. Decimating the middle.
Some people will, sure. But not every bank or every trucking company will move completely to AI. And I just meant that “40% of jobs gone in 15 years” sounds a lot like “Miami will be under water in 10 years.” It’s alarmism and it’s not true.
 

steross

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#73
Some people will, sure. But not every bank or every trucking company will move completely to AI. And I just meant that “40% of jobs gone in 15 years” sounds a lot like “Miami will be under water in 10 years.” It’s alarmism and it’s not true.
Not sure how you can confidently predict not true when in the industrial midwest it has already happened to a large extent.
Screen Shot 2019-03-07 at 6.28.43 PM.png
 
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Donnyboy

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#74
Some people will, sure. But not every bank or every trucking company will move completely to AI. And I just meant that “40% of jobs gone in 15 years” sounds a lot like “Miami will be under water in 10 years.” It’s alarmism and it’s not true.
This is different.... Miami has been there for eons and we have measured data that says it would take a paradigm shift in climate to put Miami under.....vs technology which advances in leaps and bounds and constantly unlocks new doors for itself. If I would have told you would be receiving a message from someone you never met in an interactive forum that was written on a hand held device with more computing power than all of MIT while driving in a car being guided by global position satellites and receiving real time updates from other connected drivers in say 1980..... you’d call bull shit on that too
 

Bowers2

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#75
Not sure how you can confidently predict not true when in the industrial midwest it has already happened to a large extent.
View attachment 68678
That’s just manufacturing and we already knew that was happening. And jobs didn’t go away, the workforce shifted. Even the article Donny posted, the expert says this:
“Lee’s comments are not necessarily new. Many who support artificial intelligence and automation believe that they can fundamentally change the workforce. But many of those people also believe that while some jobs could be affected, humans will find new opportunities surrounding artificial intelligence and take on new professions.”
And
“Still, many, including Lee, believe there’s no slowing down artificial intelligence and its impact on society. And he compared artificial intelligence to major innovations in history, like the steam engine and electricity, saying that humans were affected and have “gotten over it.” But he cautioned that artificial intelligence and its impact will hit us much sooner than those other innovations did.”
Even he isn’t being as alarmist as some in here are. I just think it won’t be as bad as you guys think and we’ll all still have jobs in 15 years.
 

Bowers2

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#76
This is different.... Miami has been there for eons and we have measured data that says it would take a paradigm shift in climate to put Miami under.....vs technology which advances in leaps and bounds and constantly unlocks new doors for itself. If I would have told you would be receiving a message from someone you never met in an interactive forum that was written on a hand held device with more computing power than all of MIT while driving in a car being guided by global position satellites and receiving real time updates from other connected drivers in say 1980..... you’d call bull shit on that too
Right. But what you’re saying now is all that and then, “so map makers and postal workers will all be out of the job and won’t be able to find work anywhere else! We must do something!”
No. We have all this new shit and more people are employed today than back then. Disruption and shift in the workforce of some industries, sure. Almost half of ALL jobs gone in 15 years, come on. Even the Forbes article you posted and I quoted earlier says that people who drive for a living will be most affected.
 

Donnyboy

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#77
Right. But what you’re saying now is all that and then, “so map makers and postal workers will all be out of the job and won’t be able to find work anywhere else! We must do something!”
No. We have all this new shit and more people are employed today than back then. Disruption and shift in the workforce of some industries, sure. Almost half of ALL jobs gone in 15 years, come on. Even the Forbes article you posted and I quoted earlier says that people who drive for a living will be most affected.
Name the jobs that won’t be affected and why? Machines are cheaper, better, take no time off, file no grievances etc etc etc.
 

CTeamPoke

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#78
That’s just manufacturing and we already knew that was happening. And jobs didn’t go away, the workforce shifted. Even the article Donny posted, the expert says this:
“Lee’s comments are not necessarily new. Many who support artificial intelligence and automation believe that they can fundamentally change the workforce. But many of those people also believe that while some jobs could be affected, humans will find new opportunities surrounding artificial intelligence and take on new professions.”
And
“Still, many, including Lee, believe there’s no slowing down artificial intelligence and its impact on society. And he compared artificial intelligence to major innovations in history, like the steam engine and electricity, saying that humans were affected and have “gotten over it.” But he cautioned that artificial intelligence and its impact will hit us much sooner than those other innovations did.”
Even he isn’t being as alarmist as some in here are. I just think it won’t be as bad as you guys think and we’ll all still have jobs in 15 years.
I don't think the labor force shifted dude... I think they got hooked on pain killers and died.

Which, I guess, is a shift...
 

Bowers2

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#79
Name the jobs that won’t be affected and why? Machines are cheaper, better, take no time off, file no grievances etc etc etc.
I’d rather just meet you back here in 15 years when the automatopocalypse hasn’t happened and discuss what you think went right.
 

steross

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#80
That’s just manufacturing and we already knew that was happening. And jobs didn’t go away, the workforce shifted. Even the article Donny posted, the expert says this:
“Lee’s comments are not necessarily new. Many who support artificial intelligence and automation believe that they can fundamentally change the workforce. But many of those people also believe that while some jobs could be affected, humans will find new opportunities surrounding artificial intelligence and take on new professions.”
And
“Still, many, including Lee, believe there’s no slowing down artificial intelligence and its impact on society. And he compared artificial intelligence to major innovations in history, like the steam engine and electricity, saying that humans were affected and have “gotten over it.” But he cautioned that artificial intelligence and its impact will hit us much sooner than those other innovations did.”
Even he isn’t being as alarmist as some in here are. I just think it won’t be as bad as you guys think and we’ll all still have jobs in 15 years.
The workforce shifted to what? Mostly they shifted to min/low wage service jobs, getting high on opiates, disability, and suicide.
Who is being alarmist? This is clearly an issue. The guessing game of if it is 10,15, or 20 years out is purely a false guessing game as it is already happening and we are just trying to guess how quickly it will progress. Much of which will depend on how we deal with it. The idea that truck drivers are going to become AI truck repairmen and programers is just not based on the evidence we already have from displaced manufacturing workers.