Tucker Carlson: The rise of automation

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.
Jun 4, 2014
929
689
143
Dallas, TX
#3
Automation is going to remove a large number of folks from their jobs. Once it picks up and really ramps up we will have a similar job market to the Guilded Age when the American Tycoons really took root.

This was also a topic brought forth by Jeb Bush during the 2016 primary. It just wasn’t a hot topic because it’s not “sexy” or “inciting”. I think that there really needs to be a hard look at our educational system and the ridiculousness of degrees being offered.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:
Jun 4, 2014
929
689
143
Dallas, TX
#4
Briefly reading about his campaign platform, Yang wants to introduce a Universal Basic Income. I am very skeptical of that as a solution to the problem. In my opinion the work force needs to adapt to the changing needs of the world. And the way to do that is through the proper schooling/training, not free money from the government.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Jun 4, 2014
929
689
143
Dallas, TX
#5
LOL, Cimarron would sharply disagree. After all, the replacement of horses with tractors didn't cause riots and suicides down on the farm.
That isn’t a very good analogy as it is not a transition that displaced people. A better example would be to look at the clothing factories of Victorian England wiping out the labor force of the Indian fabric makers, which has continued to wreck their economy.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Jul 20, 2018
1,293
172
143
77539
#6
That isn’t a very good analogy as it is not a transition that displaced people. A better example would be to look at the clothing factories of Victorian England wiping out the labor force of the Indian fabric makers, which has continued to wreck their economy.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
We've gone through this dozens of times with jobs such as telegraph operators/runners, telephone switchboard operators, draftsmen, typists, etc etc. People have always adapted and moved on to other jobs. If trucks are going to be driven autonomously, someone is still going to have to repair them when they break down.
 
Jun 4, 2014
929
689
143
Dallas, TX
#7
That isn’t a very good analogy as it is not a transition that displaced people. A better example would be to look at the clothing factories of Victorian England wiping out the labor force of the Indian fabric makers, which has continued to wreck their economy.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
We've gone through this dozens of times with jobs such as telegraph operators/runners, telephone switchboard operators, draftsmen, typists, etc etc. People have always adapted and moved on to other jobs. If trucks are going to be driven autonomously, someone is still going to have to repair them when they break down.
I agree that the workforce will adapt. I just don’t think we have experienced a mass technological advancement since we first industrialized. It will be a tough transition. For instance a lot of accounting jobs will get cut with automation.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Dec 9, 2013
308
165
593
48
#8
We've gone through this dozens of times with jobs such as telegraph operators/runners, telephone switchboard operators, draftsmen, typists, etc etc. People have always adapted and moved on to other jobs. If trucks are going to be driven autonomously, someone is still going to have to repair them when they break down.
I agree that we will adapt & we are better served when we forecast this & get the proper education & skills training ahead of automation as best we can.

Interesting footnote 60 Minutes had a story last week on the rise of electric cars in China. Many incredible pieces to the story but to your point on repair & maintenance, one such Chinese electric vehicle company has a mobile automated maintenance center. Also interesting was a “command center” that displayed real time location of every EV. I will keep my hydrocarbon burning vehicle and currently don’t think the economics work in US for EVs.
 

CTeamPoke

Legendary Cowboy
Jun 18, 2008
43,809
46,708
1,743
Dallas, TX
#10
Automation is going to remove a large number of folks from their jobs. Once it picks up and really ramps up we will have a similar job market to the Guilded Age when the American Tycoons really took root.

This was also a topic brought forth by Jeb Bush during the 2016 primary. It just wasn’t a hot topic because it’s not “sexy” or “inciting”. I think that there really needs to be a hard look at our educational system and the ridiculousness of degrees being offered.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
What degrees do you deem "ridiculous"?
 

CTeamPoke

Legendary Cowboy
Jun 18, 2008
43,809
46,708
1,743
Dallas, TX
#13
All of them that don't lead to a decent living wage right out of college.
That's a pretty narrow definition that is based on your wants and needs.

I know several art history majors that have gone on to make amazing lives for themselves. I know several marketing majors that can't find a way to make more than $50k per year.

A college education is aimed to make you a more well rounded individual... The problem is we have forgotten that, and pushed people to specialize too early.

Prior generations have made it much, much harder for young people today to go out and get a job because they require specialized degrees and years of experience. We need to stop blaming the kids for this.

Some old guy was telling me that they need to get rid of "liberal arts" and "social science" and make students learn economics... I had to inform him that economics is both of those things, and my econ degree from OSU puts some validity behind that... But I've been selling software for 8 years now after a stint in sports, so I don't ever really use anything I learned in college... So what difference does my degree make?
 

jobob85

Alcoholistic Sage
A/V Subscriber
Mar 11, 2009
21,516
26,684
1,743
#19
We've gone through this dozens of times with jobs such as telegraph operators/runners, telephone switchboard operators, draftsmen, typists, etc etc. People have always adapted and moved on to other jobs. If trucks are going to be driven autonomously, someone is still going to have to repair them when they break down.
Repairing the trucks isn’t adapting and moving on, it’s a job that is already there and not a need created by innovation.
 
Jun 4, 2014
929
689
143
Dallas, TX
#20
Automation is going to remove a large number of folks from their jobs. Once it picks up and really ramps up we will have a similar job market to the Guilded Age when the American Tycoons really took root.

This was also a topic brought forth by Jeb Bush during the 2016 primary. It just wasn’t a hot topic because it’s not “sexy” or “inciting”. I think that there really needs to be a hard look at our educational system and the ridiculousness of degrees being offered.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
What degrees do you deem "ridiculous"?
I worded that poorly. I think that the price of a number of degrees has exceeded the earning potential of those degrees. Mostly this group consists of liberal arts degrees offered from small colleges at astronomical prices. These kids then get loans to go to these schools and get upside down because their degree of choice has little earning potential in that field. That’s not to say they couldn’t be successful with those degrees, it’s just that the odds are lower. And in my opinion the kids get these degrees from these expensive colleges thinking they’ll have a solid job lined up after because of the college they attended. It’s poor counseling by the school and the parents of the kids IMO.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk