Top 10 Food Safety Tips for this Holiday Season . . . for Steross

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Feb 6, 2007
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#1
@steross Read #5 closely



Top 10 food safety tips for this holiday season


(Stillwater, Oklahoma – Dec. 11, 2018) The Christmas season is here, and many will be gathering around the dinner table devouring their favorite holiday meals.



Oklahoma State University’s Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center wants to make sure you keep food safety tips in mind when preparing those holiday meals.



“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates each year about 1 in 6 Americans get sick from foodborne diseases,” said Peter Muriana, FAPC food microbiologist. “While the U.S. food supply is one of the safest in the world, food safety during the holidays is a must in order to prevent bacteria from growing and causing illness.”



Muriana suggests the following food safety tips to ensure your holiday meal is not only delicious, but also safe.



  1. Shop for holiday foods safely. Buy your meat preferably 1 to 2 days before you cook it, and keep the meat separated from the fresh produce when bagging. Extra caution should be used when buying fresh, stuffed turkeys because of the potential for bacteria growth in the stuffing. Pick up the meat, dairy, eggnog and eggs just before checking out.
  2. Develop a master plan. Take into consideration your refrigerator, freezer and oven space to keep hot foods at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or higher and cold foods at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. If you use coolers, make sure you have plenty of clean ice and check it frequently to make sure the ice has not melted.
  3. Wash hands often. Wash hands before, during and after food preparation to minimize bacterial contamination. Wash with hot water and soap up to your wrists and between your fingers for approximately 20 seconds.
  4. Separate to avoid cross contamination. Use two cutting boards: one for preparing raw meat, poultry and fish, and the other for cutting fruits and vegetables, cooked food or preparing salads.
  5. Wash all fresh produce. Rinse fruits and vegetables thoroughly under cool running water and use a produce brush to remove surface dirt. Even wash prepackaged greens to minimize bacterial contamination.
  6. Thaw frozen meats safely. Defrost meats in the refrigerator for approximately 24 hours, depending on size, or submerge meat in its original package in a pan of enough cold water to cover the meat. Allow 30 minutes thawing time for every pound.
  7. Cook to proper temperature. Use a thermometer to make sure food has been cooked enough to kill bacteria. Turkey, stuffing, side dishes and all leftovers should be cooked to at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit.
  8. Keep guests out of the kitchen. Holidays occur during cold and flu season, and preventing guests from sampling the food while it is being prepared limits the amount of germs getting on the food. Serve appetizers to give guests something to nibble on until the meal is ready.
  9. Refrigerate leftovers. Leftovers should be divided into smaller portions, stored in several shallow containers and refrigerated within two hours after cooking. Leftovers should be eaten within 3 to 4 days. If large amounts are left, consider freezing leftovers for later use.
  10. Eating leftovers. Reheat leftovers to 165 degrees Fahrenheit throughout or until steaming hot. Soups, sauces and gravies should be brought to a rolling boil for at least 1 minute. Never taste leftover food that looks or smells strange. When in doubt, throw it out.
For more food safety information, visit http://fapc.biz/videos/food-safety/2018-holiday-food-safety or text FAPC to 80802 to download the FAPC Connect app.



FAPC, a part of OSU’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, helps to discover, develop and deliver technical and business information that stimulates and supports the growth of value-added food and agricultural products and processing in Oklahoma.



- ### -​


Oklahoma State University, as an equal opportunity employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws regarding non-discrimination and affirmative action. Oklahoma State University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all individuals and does not discriminate based on race, religion, age, sex, color, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, or veteran status with regard to employment, educational programs and activities, and/or admissions. For more information, visit https:///eeo.okstate.edu.



Mandy H. Gross
Manager, Communications Services

Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center
Oklahoma State University

144 FAPC | Stillwater, OK 74078-6055

405-744-0442 | mandy.gross@okstate.edu

http://www.fapc.biz

Text FAPC to 80802 to download the FAPC Connect App!

http://www.fapcconnect.com
 

steross

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Well, if the first 10 times that @RxCowboy and I explained it to you in the last thread wasn't enough to have you actually comprehend the point, doing it all over again in another thread with the same tired and ignorant argument that still completely misses the point isn't going to really do much now, is it?
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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#3
Wash all fresh produce. Rinse fruits and vegetables thoroughly under cool running water and use a produce brush to remove surface dirt. Even wash prepackaged greens to minimize bacterial contamination.
I actually went looking for this data to counter @steross with "all we need to do is wash the food before we eat it." What I found is that washing is useless with the kind of contamination that occurred in Yuma and occurred recently with romaine. If you have produce that may have picked up some contamination along the way then by all means wash it as recommended. But the kind of contamination that has produced the outbreaks that we have seen recently, washing is useless. That is, unless you have a power washer or you wash it in bleach for 15 minutes.

If you have data that shows otherwise then please post it or stop making this argument.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5694878/

Food Sci Nutr. 2017 Nov; 5(6): 1215–1220.
Published online 2017 Sep 20. doi: [10.1002/fsn3.514]
PMCID: PMC5694878
PMID: 29188050
Effects of household washing on bacterial load and removal of Escherichia coli from lettuce and “ready-to-eat” salads
Elisabeth Uhlig, 1 Crister Olsson, 2 Jiayi He, 1 Therese Stark, 1 Zuzanna Sadowska, 1 Göran Molin, 1 Siv Ahrné, 1 Beatrix Alsanius, 2 and Åsa Håkanssoncorresponding author 1
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract
Customer demands for fresh salads are increasing, but leafy green vegetables have also been linked to food-borne illness due to pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. As a safety measure, consumers often wash leafy vegetables in water before consumption. In this study, we analyzed the efficiency of household washing to reduce the bacterial content. Romaine lettuce and ready-to-eat mixed salad were washed several times in flowing water at different rates and by immersing the leaves in water. Lettuce was also inoculated with E. coli before washing. Only washing in a high flow rate (8 L/min) resulted in statistically significant reductions (p < .05), “Total aerobic count” was reduced by 80%, and Enterobacteriaceae count was reduced by 68% after the first rinse. The number of contaminating E. coli was not significantly reduced. The dominating part of the culturable microbiota of the washed lettuce was identified by rRNA 16S sequencing of randomly picked colonies. The majority belonged to Pseudomonadaceae, but isolates from Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceaceae were also frequently found. This study shows the inefficiency of tap water washing methods available for the consumer when it comes to removal of bacteria from lettuce. Even after washing, the lettuce contained high levels of bacteria that in a high dose and under certain circumstances may constitute a health risk.

Keywords: E. coli, leafy green vegetables, ready-to-eat, rinsing, water bath

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5071777/

Front Microbiol. 2016; 7: 1663.
Published online 2016 Oct 20. doi: [10.3389/fmi
PMCID: PMC5071777
PMID: 27812356
Effectiveness of Washing Procedures in Reducing Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes on a Raw Leafy Green Vegetable (Eruca vesicaria)
Alessandra Pezzuto,1,† Simone Belluco,2,3,† Carmen Losasso,2,* Ilaria Patuzzi,2,4 Paola Bordin,2 Alessia Piovesana,1 Damiano Comin,1 Renzo Mioni,1 and Antonia Ricci2
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract
Vegetables are an important source of nutrients, but they can host a large microbial population, particularly bacteria. Foodborne pathogens can contaminate raw vegetables at any stage of their production process with a potential for human infection. Appropriate washing can mitigate the risk of foodborne illness consequent to vegetable consumption by reducing pathogen levels, but few data are available to assess the efficacy of different practices. In the present work, six different washing methods, in the presence or absence of sanitisers (peracetic acid and percitric acid, sodium bicarbonate, sodium hypochlorite) and vinegar, were tested for their effectiveness in reducing Salmonella and Listeria counts after artificial contamination of raw rocket (Eruca vesicaria). Results showed that washing with sodium hypochlorite (200 mg/L) was the only method able to produce a significant 2 Log reduction of Salmonella counts, but only in the case of high initial contamination (7 Log CFU/g), suggesting potential harmful effects for consumers could occur. In the case of Listeria monocytogenes, all the examined washing methods were effective, with 200 mg/L sodium hypochlorite solution and a solution of peracetic and percitric acids displaying the best performances (2 and 1.5 Log reductions, respectively). This highlights the importance of targeting consumers on fit for purpose and safe washing practices to circumvent vegetable contamination by foodborne pathogens.

Keywords: consumer phase, food safety, fresh produce, microbiological risk, Salmonella, Listeria
 
Feb 6, 2007
4,455
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Ardmore, Ok.
#4
Well, if the first 10 times that @RxCowboy and I explained it to you in the last thread wasn't enough to have you actually comprehend the point, doing it all over again in another thread with the same tired and ignorant argument that still completely misses the point isn't going to really do much now, is it?
So, if a cancer drug is effective in only a small percentage of cases, do we trash it?
 

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
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#5
So, if a cancer drug is effective in only a small percentage of cases, do we trash it?
The answer to that false analogy about a point I never made is in the other thread that you didn't bother to read.

When did you decide to quit being a reasonable poster and join the parade concrete brains around this place?

It just isn't even worth it to post here anymore. There is now more intelligent dialogue in the comment sections of Yahoo!.
 
Feb 11, 2007
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Oklahoma City
#8
I actually went looking for this data to counter @steross with "all we need to do is wash the food before we eat it." What I found is that washing is useless with the kind of contamination that occurred in Yuma and occurred recently with romaine. If you have produce that may have picked up some contamination along the way then by all means wash it as recommended. But the kind of contamination that has produced the outbreaks that we have seen recently, washing is useless. That is, unless you have a power washer or you wash it in bleach for 15 minutes.

If you have data that shows otherwise then please post it or stop making this argument.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5694878/

Food Sci Nutr. 2017 Nov; 5(6): 1215–1220.
Published online 2017 Sep 20. doi: [10.1002/fsn3.514]
PMCID: PMC5694878
PMID: 29188050
Effects of household washing on bacterial load and removal of Escherichia coli from lettuce and “ready-to-eat” salads
Elisabeth Uhlig, 1 Crister Olsson, 2 Jiayi He, 1 Therese Stark, 1 Zuzanna Sadowska, 1 Göran Molin, 1 Siv Ahrné, 1 Beatrix Alsanius, 2 and Åsa Håkanssoncorresponding author 1
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract
Customer demands for fresh salads are increasing, but leafy green vegetables have also been linked to food-borne illness due to pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. As a safety measure, consumers often wash leafy vegetables in water before consumption. In this study, we analyzed the efficiency of household washing to reduce the bacterial content. Romaine lettuce and ready-to-eat mixed salad were washed several times in flowing water at different rates and by immersing the leaves in water. Lettuce was also inoculated with E. coli before washing. Only washing in a high flow rate (8 L/min) resulted in statistically significant reductions (p < .05), “Total aerobic count” was reduced by 80%, and Enterobacteriaceae count was reduced by 68% after the first rinse. The number of contaminating E. coli was not significantly reduced. The dominating part of the culturable microbiota of the washed lettuce was identified by rRNA 16S sequencing of randomly picked colonies. The majority belonged to Pseudomonadaceae, but isolates from Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceaceae were also frequently found. This study shows the inefficiency of tap water washing methods available for the consumer when it comes to removal of bacteria from lettuce. Even after washing, the lettuce contained high levels of bacteria that in a high dose and under certain circumstances may constitute a health risk.

Keywords: E. coli, leafy green vegetables, ready-to-eat, rinsing, water bath

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5071777/

Front Microbiol. 2016; 7: 1663.
Published online 2016 Oct 20. doi: [10.3389/fmi
PMCID: PMC5071777
PMID: 27812356
Effectiveness of Washing Procedures in Reducing Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes on a Raw Leafy Green Vegetable (Eruca vesicaria)
Alessandra Pezzuto,1,† Simone Belluco,2,3,† Carmen Losasso,2,* Ilaria Patuzzi,2,4 Paola Bordin,2 Alessia Piovesana,1 Damiano Comin,1 Renzo Mioni,1 and Antonia Ricci2
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract
Vegetables are an important source of nutrients, but they can host a large microbial population, particularly bacteria. Foodborne pathogens can contaminate raw vegetables at any stage of their production process with a potential for human infection. Appropriate washing can mitigate the risk of foodborne illness consequent to vegetable consumption by reducing pathogen levels, but few data are available to assess the efficacy of different practices. In the present work, six different washing methods, in the presence or absence of sanitisers (peracetic acid and percitric acid, sodium bicarbonate, sodium hypochlorite) and vinegar, were tested for their effectiveness in reducing Salmonella and Listeria counts after artificial contamination of raw rocket (Eruca vesicaria). Results showed that washing with sodium hypochlorite (200 mg/L) was the only method able to produce a significant 2 Log reduction of Salmonella counts, but only in the case of high initial contamination (7 Log CFU/g), suggesting potential harmful effects for consumers could occur. In the case of Listeria monocytogenes, all the examined washing methods were effective, with 200 mg/L sodium hypochlorite solution and a solution of peracetic and percitric acids displaying the best performances (2 and 1.5 Log reductions, respectively). This highlights the importance of targeting consumers on fit for purpose and safe washing practices to circumvent vegetable contamination by foodborne pathogens.

Keywords: consumer phase, food safety, fresh produce, microbiological risk, Salmonella, Listeria
The US Navy as they travel around the world, needing fresh fruit and vegetables, use
sodium hypochlorite (Clorox) to lower the bacteria load. I often use dilute Clorox on salads for about 30 minutes then rinse off and eat. There is no smell or after taste.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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#9
The US Navy as they travel around the world, needing fresh fruit and vegetables, use
sodium hypochlorite (Clorox) to lower the bacteria load. I often use dilute Clorox on salads for about 30 minutes then rinse off and eat. There is no smell or after taste.
That's great for the Navy, but that would greatly increase the costs for most people, and it shouldn't be necessary.
 
Feb 6, 2007
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#10
The answer to that false analogy about a point I never made is in the other thread that you didn't bother to read.

When did you decide to quit being a reasonable poster and join the parade concrete brains around this place?

It just isn't even worth it to post here anymore. There is now more intelligent dialogue in the comment sections of Yahoo!.
It has long been an observation of mine that "specialists" and oftentimes persons of high intellect, of which I would assume you to have, struggle sometimes to see the bigger picture. "Can't see the forest for the trees" if you will. The paradox is that intellect sometimes prevents them from recognizing they are wrong.
 
Feb 6, 2007
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#11
Apples and oranges, bro, and you know it.
No, "bro", it is not apples and oranges. The point is that completely dissing a strategy or method, whether it be using a drug or washing produce to disinfect, just because it has a low chance of success, does not necessarily justify totally discrediting it. Win a battle here and there and eventually you might win the war.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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#12
No, "bro", it is not apples and oranges. The point is that completely dissing a strategy or method, whether it be using a drug or washing produce to disinfect, just because it has a low chance of success, does not necessarily justify totally discrediting it. Win a battle here and there and eventually you might win the war.
Completely apples and oranges, because without treatment people with cancer die. If a treatment saves a few of them then a few of them are better off. That is far different than washing failing in all but a microscopic few cases in the kind of contamination we're discussion. Apples and oranges. You should be embarrassed that I've had to 'splain it to you.

Data. Show some that ordinary washing will take care of the kind of contamination that happened at Yuma or STFU about this, because I've provided data that it doesn't.
 
Feb 6, 2007
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#14
Completely apples and oranges, because without treatment people with cancer die. If a treatment saves a few of them then a few of them are better off. That is far different than washing failing in all but a microscopic few cases in the kind of contamination we're discussion. Apples and oranges. You should be embarrassed that I've had to 'splain it to you.

Data. Show some that ordinary washing will take care of the kind of contamination that happened at Yuma or STFU about this, because I've provided data that it doesn't.
Listen Jackass, don't tell me to STFU. Pompous ass. Your premise is that I have stated that consumer washing cures all ills, and that is NEVER what I have proposed. My fundamental stance is this whole discussion is that until better solutions are developed, all segments of the food chain must act with precaution and do all that they can to minimize such instances. You and Steross have repeatedly taken my comments out of context and accused me of saying that consumer rinsing is THE solution . . . completely an erroneous proposition.
Until better prevention and mitigation practices are discovered and implemented, I will take my advice and direction on the subject from the food safety professionals (example posted above) rather than doctors and pharmacists, knowing full well that the likes of you and Steross cannot believe that anyone would have more authority and expertise of the subject than you and he.

"Completely apples and oranges, because without treatment people with cancer die. If a treatment saves a few of them then a few of them are better off. That is far different than washing failing in all but a microscopic few cases in the kind of contamination we're discussion. Apples and oranges. You should be embarrassed that I've had to 'splain it to you."
You should be embarrassed that I have to explain the analogy to you; if a particular cancer treatment is effective only 5% of the time, and if consumer rinsing were effective only 5% of the time, do we condemn those 5% who survive, and deem the treatments totally ineffective just because the vast majority (95%) die?
How many homeopathy products do you sell in your pharmacy, that have 0% clinical proof that they work as claimed? If you cannot honestly state that you have absolutely none, than you are hypocritical on this entire subject.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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Nov 8, 2004
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#15
Listen Jackass, don't tell me to STFU. Pompous ass. Your premise is that I have stated that consumer washing cures all ills, and that is NEVER what I have proposed. My fundamental stance is this whole discussion is that until better solutions are developed, all segments of the food chain must act with precaution and do all that they can to minimize such instances. You and Steross have repeatedly taken my comments out of context and accused me of saying that consumer rinsing is THE solution . . . completely an erroneous proposition.
Until better prevention and mitigation practices are discovered and implemented, I will take my advice and direction on the subject from the food safety professionals (example posted above) rather than doctors and pharmacists, knowing full well that the likes of you and Steross cannot believe that anyone would have more authority and expertise of the subject than you and he.

"Completely apples and oranges, because without treatment people with cancer die. If a treatment saves a few of them then a few of them are better off. That is far different than washing failing in all but a microscopic few cases in the kind of contamination we're discussion. Apples and oranges. You should be embarrassed that I've had to 'splain it to you."
You should be embarrassed that I have to explain the analogy to you; if a particular cancer treatment is effective only 5% of the time, and if consumer rinsing were effective only 5% of the time, do we condemn those 5% who survive, and deem the treatments totally ineffective just because the vast majority (95%) die?
How many homeopathy products do you sell in your pharmacy, that have 0% clinical proof that they work as claimed? If you cannot honestly state that you have absolutely none, than you are hypocritical on this entire subject.
Still no data backing up your assertion, not even an attempt at data, nothing but more blah blah blah... stfu...

Don't take advice from me or steross. Please, really, don't. Look at the data I posted and decide for yourself. That's precisely what I did. Again, I looked up the data in order to counter steross, to say exactly what you have been saying, "all we have to do is wash our produce". What I found is that ordinary washing is useless for the kind of contamination that we're talking about about. Look at the data I posted. Look up data for yourself. Or keep mindlessly parroting useless information from food professionals that doesn't take into account the kind of contamination we're talking about. It's up to you.

As far as cancer treatments, 5% survival when 100% die is clinically significant. We're not talking about consumer rinsing being effective 5% of the time in the Yuma contamination. We're talking about it not removing enough of the bacteria to prevent infection. In other words, essentially being zero percent effective. For ordinary contamination, fine rinse. But it's useless... useless... for contamination like Yuma and the recent romaine contamination. It requires power washing or rinsing in bleach for 15 minutes.

Homeopathy doesn't work and I have never said it does. I am an academician and clinician and don't sell anything, which you should know by now. But if I did I certainly wouldn't sell homeopathy which is antiscientific hogwash. Try again sweetheart.
 
Feb 6, 2007
4,455
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Ardmore, Ok.
#16
"all we have to do is wash our produce".
This is exactly what I mean by you and Steross taking my comments out of context. I have NEVER said this. Go back and look at my posts. I have never stated that consumer rinsing was THE solution. My only ONLY statement is that everyone in the food chain must do what they can to minimize these instances, and I HAVE stated that certain produce lends itself to more or less effective results because of surface texture, plant structure, etc. Until you post conclusive evidence that consumer rinsing is absolutely NEVER effective, and anyone with half a brain knows that science is never conclusive, I will continue to lean on the advice of FOOD Safety professionals and their recommendations, for the same reasons that I value nutrition information of registered dieticians over doctors and pharmacists. Get over it.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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Nov 8, 2004
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#17
This is exactly what I mean by you and Steross taking my comments out of context. I have NEVER said this. Go back and look at my posts. I have never stated that consumer rinsing was THE solution. My only ONLY statement is that everyone in the food chain must do what they can to minimize these instances, and I HAVE stated that certain produce lends itself to more or less effective results because of surface texture, plant structure, etc. Until you post conclusive evidence that consumer rinsing is absolutely NEVER effective, and anyone with half a brain knows that science is never conclusive, I will continue to lean on the advice of FOOD Safety professionals and their recommendations, for the same reasons that I value nutrition information of registered dieticians over doctors and pharmacists. Get over it.
And now you're taking what steross and I are saying out of context, because that's something we've never said. What we've said is that consumer washing is useless in the kinds of contamination that has produced recent outbreaks, the outbreaks to which you've responded "wash your produce". You've still produced no data that ordinary washing is useful for preventing outbreaks like the recent romaine. What can consumers do to prevent such outbreaks other than not buy the produce?