This! (is a thread political in nature about racism and sports)

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
5,710
3,218
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
#11
Yes. I agree. Racism is rampant today as it was yesterday and will be tomrrow. Talking about it and LISTENING are some of the best ways to reach the inner thoughts of everyone and at the same time, enough to drive some to the point of not caring anymore.
We are all on different paths in our lives. Lives that reach milestones. Some in order like everyone else, some milestones not in order like everyone else. That moment was when someone calls you that name, the name based solely on your skin. The experience of having the tar beat out of you before the milestone of a double digit birthday, because you're not the same kind of color as those that did reach it. That peculiar feeling you get when you know you're the best candidate and yet you didn't get the position. Yet, there's more on the path behind you. In front of you. You realize you're not alone. No matter how it happens or the order, everyone goes through a period, an evolving, the realization that you too have been an instigator, a victim of, and a conquerer of ones own heart; you realize that you can move on the path. Some are behind you who have yet to understand. Some are in front of you that completely understand. Some are next to you and they're screaming Go Pokes! The only color I'm passionate about now is orange. How orange are you?
 
Aug 11, 2004
1,227
81
1,678
56
Newkirk, Ok
#12
Prejudice and bigotry are basic human emotions that aren't going to disappear. Racism is just one form of them. I think we all need to look in a mirror once in awhile to judge ourselves and our particular biases.
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
16,740
24,025
1,743
Tulsa, OK
#16
So what actually did happen at the club. I simply do not believe that police break peoples legs for no reason whatsoever, regardless of their skin color. Not saying he was actually guilty of anything, but if you resist, even if you did nothing, then you may get hurt and will get arrested. I'm white and have been falsely accuse of doing something before. I didn't resist and I was free to go very shortly after that, but if I had resisted, I might have been injured and I would have been arrested.
 

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
26,543
31,981
1,743
oklahoma city
#18
So what actually did happen at the club. I simply do not believe that police break peoples legs for no reason whatsoever, regardless of their skin color. Not saying he was actually guilty of anything, but if you resist, even if you did nothing, then you may get hurt and will get arrested. I'm white and have been falsely accuse of doing something before. I didn't resist and I was free to go very shortly after that, but if I had resisted, I might have been injured and I would have been arrested.
He was charged with resisting arrest and was found not guilty.

His situation sounds far different than yours. He wasn't charged, he was beaten. The only thing he did was call the officer a midget after the guy was rude to him. He was so certain of his innocence that he refused a no-plea bargain with dismissal of charges.

Last April, Sefolosha and his Atlanta Hawks teammate, Pero Antić, were arrested outside a nightclub and charged with resisting arrest, disorderly conduct, and “obstructing governmental administration.” As my colleague Elie Mystal explained:

Here’s what happened: there was a stabbing at a club. Outside the club, unrelated to the stabbing, Sefolosha was giving a homeless man some money. NYPD was trying to clear the area. Sefolosha was moving along, but took issue with the tone of some of the officers. Sefolosha (who is 6’6’’) admits that he called an officer (who is 5’7’’) a “midget.”

Then… NYPD threw him to the ground, broke his leg, and charged him with all kinds of crap in order to justify breaking a dude’s leg. The jury found that he wasn’t resisting arrest, and that he wasn’t obstructing justice. Instead, it seems like Sefolosha’s only crime was being verbally dismissive of a New York police officer.

The Daily Show clip offers a behind-the-scenes look at the legal strategy for the case. Defense lawyer Alex Spiro — an interesting character in his own right, a Harvard Law grad who worked for the CIA and as a Manhattan prosecutor before joining up with lawyer to the stars Ben Brafman — actually urged Sefolosha to consider the prosecution’s proposal. It involved no prison time, no fine, and dismissal of charges after six months if Sefolosha stayed out of trouble.

But Sefolosha, insisting on his innocence, demanded to go to trial. My colleague Elie’s theory: “Sefolosha’s not from here — he’s Swiss — so he might actually have expected a ‘fair trial.'” And in the end, it appears that he got one. The trial lasted four days; the jury deliberated for under an hour before acquitting Sefolosha of all charges.

https://abovethelaw.com/2016/03/a-wrongful-arrest-defense-clinic-the-thabo-sefolosha-story/
 

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
26,543
31,981
1,743
oklahoma city
#19
Ok, I'm not personally for reparations as I do not think that any reparation policy that I have heard will fix the issue or not end up being another welfare program that might harm more than it helps.

That said, unlike the rest of you, I understand the concept and it isn't "why pay someone now for what happened to others in the past." That is not it at all.

Think about you get hired for a job at the same time as an OU grad. And the business owner is an OU grad. And he says, "Ok, how we are going to do your pay is that each year one of you is going to get paid $40 an hour and the other is going to make $20 per hour. We are going to determine that by the bedlam football game." If OU wins, the other guy gets the higher pay, if OSU wins, you get it.

The boss notes that this is completely fair as each team has a 50/50 chance of winning the game. But, of course, you look at the history of cheating for OU and the advantages that OU has obtained in money, recruiting, media, name recognition, majority fan support etc and realize that you are getting a raw deal. They say that the past is irrelevant, it is a fair deal now as each team has the same opportunity to win.

Now, imagine that your life is filled with nearly every opportunity being something like this. It is currently "fair," but coming from a history of unfairness that makes the advantage continue.
 

NTXPoke

Wrangler
Jul 10, 2009
220
163
1,593
57
Stillwater, OK
#20
The problem with this analogy is that most likely, "YOU" do not influence the outcome of the Bedlam football game in any way. You DO have the ability to take advantage of free public education, public libraries, free podcasts, develop your work ethic and skills and take advantage of all opportunities offered. Take a job, any job, to develop a work history, etc. And if you are getting paid $20 per hour while a coworker makes double that, after some soul searching to make certain that he / she is not actually twice a valuable to the employer, you have the freedom to seek another employer.