THE SCIENCE IS CLEAR: DIRTY FARM WATER IS MAKING US SICK

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RxCowboy

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My understanding is that Yuma valley has a high quality source of water, of course it's all relative isn't it? That in no way inferes we can't and shouldn't strive to be better!!

My under standing is that the e. coli found in the water was found in one canal, not the entire water system.
And if that canal had been being tested then perhaps the farms that were using it could have used that high quality water source instead of the fecal contaminated canal water.
There are all sorts of inspections of equipment, facilities, etc on these farms.
Then how did this happen? Why was this missed?
It makes little sense with the invesment's in these farms and fields to take those sorts of risk. It can cost them their business.
And yet it happened, didn't it. And it is and happened again, hasn't it.
 

RxCowboy

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It depends on the produce. As I stated in another post, some produce, by virtue of its skin/rind texture (and other variables related to storage, transport, method of harvest, etc., etc.) are either harder or easier to disinfect. I do not propose that the consumer can be 100% efficient at eliminating all bacteria, but neither can the source, the distributor, or the retailer. However, what I am saying to you is that if EVERYBODY in the food chain, from the producer to the consumer, do their part, we have a much better chance of increasing our efficiency and MINIMIZING food-borne illnesses relate to these pathogens. If the consumer does nothing, we will still have issues even if the other segments do everything within their power.
Okay, I've looked for data on scrubbing fruits and vegetables with rinds. I can find a lot of experts saying we should do it, but no data showing that it actually reduces pathogen loads. Do you know of such data?

Again, I ask, given the data I've posted showing that it requires high pressure washing and/or bleaching (for 15 minutes no less), what can the consumer do apart from simply not buy the produce?
 
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And if that canal had been being tested then perhaps the farms that were using it could have used that high quality water source instead of the fecal contaminated canal water.

Then how did this happen? Why was this missed?

And yet it happened, didn't it. And it is and happened again, hasn't it.
What's the farmer going to do? Go pick up that canal with the high quality water in it and carry it to his farm?

Here's a link on the Yuma Valley water canal systems. http://www.yumairrigation.com/irrigation.html
 

RxCowboy

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And if that canal had been being tested then perhaps the farms that were using it could have used that high quality water source instead of the fecal contaminated canal water.

Then how did this happen? Why was this missed?

And yet it happened, didn't it. And it is and happened again, hasn't it.
What's the farmer going to do? Go pick up that canal with the high quality water in it and carry it to his farm?

Here's a link on the Yuma Valley water canal systems. http://www.yumairrigation.com/irrigation.html
What could they do to not kill people with their product?

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Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
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And if that canal had been being tested then perhaps the farms that were using it could have used that high quality water source instead of the fecal contaminated canal water.

Then how did this happen? Why was this missed?

And yet it happened, didn't it. And it is and happened again, hasn't it.
Why don't you just go out there and help them Rx.
 

steross

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Why don't you just go out there and help them Rx.
The prior administration tried, it was delayed by the current one.


While postponing the water-testing rules would save growers $12 million per year, it also would cost consumers $108 million per year in medical expenses, according to an FDA analysis.
 

Cimarron

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As I thought, you don't know.

It was part of the WOTUS regulations that Obama pushed through not unlike the manuavering he did for Obama Care (your favorite policy I think). It was and remains a hotly contested issue and what Trump did was delay the WOTUS regulations for further review. The law basically subverts the power and authority of individual states in regards to water rights and expands on the water rights granted to the Federal government by the constitution.

Additionally, most of the growers in that region belong to farmers assocations that has additional guidelines and procedures in place that are of a higher standard than that this regulation would have put in place. It's my understanding that many of those association members were watering out of that canal. It isn't a given that this rule (whatever you think it is) would have identified the issue up front.
 

steross

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So then, why bother to scrub down prior to performing surgery. Just because you cannot see bacteria, means that you cannot attempt to disinfect something?
Really?
Because there is very good evidence that handwashing in medical care decreases the rate of infection.
As Rx showed, this isn't the case for washing lettuce at home.

What you are saying is the equivalent of the surgeon saying, well, I might not wash my hands well enough but we are in this together so the patient should make sure they take a lot of Vit C before the surgery.
Sounds great, other than Vit C prior to surgery doesn't affect infection rate and washing lettuce in your sink does not either.
As was mentioned, we could all pour bleach baths for our lettuce and stain up everything in the house. Just like we could all wear parachutes on passenger airlines just in case also. But, seems far better for the airline to use proper safety guidelines and checks even if it costs them some and better for the lettuce producer to use clean water even if it cost them some.
 

Cimarron

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This whole thread reinforces the old adage that "you don't $#!+ where you eat".

Nothing new here. Us old folks been knowing this for a long time. :)
You don't think food is safer today than it was 25, 50, 100, 200 years ago? Especially here in the United States?

Why today do we feel safer not teaching food safety in schools like we used to?
 
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You don't think food is safer today than it was 25, 50, 100, 200 years ago? Especially here in the United States?

Why today do we feel safer not teaching food safety in schools like we used to?
Good question. We had health classes in the 50's, (and government for that matter) that taught fundamental health education.

Sure food is safer when grown under US control. All these south/central America imports claiming to be "organic" (and what isn't) is a crap shoot (pun intended). All the regulations in the world can't trump a pair of unwashed hands after a dump or even touching a door knob/pull in any public place and eating without washing one's hands. Even with that, @steross makes a valid point about microscopic contamination. I think I'll continue to err on the side of caution and wash up.

The single bacteria I kill may be the one would have killed me. At my age, things are conspiring against me. ;)
 

Cimarron

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Good question. We had health classes in the 50's, (and government for that matter) that taught fundamental health education.

Sure food is safer when grown under US control. All these south/central America imports claiming to be "organic" (and what isn't) is a crap shoot (pun intended). All the regulations in the world can't trump a pair of unwashed hands after a dump or even touching a door knob/pull in any public place and eating without washing one's hands. Even with that, @steross makes a valid point about microscopic contamination. I think I'll continue to err on the side of caution and wash up.

The single bacteria I kill may be the one would have killed me. At my age, things are conspiring against me. ;)
Wash your hands and pass on the free mints and toothpicks in the bowl on your way out of the resturaunt.