THE SCIENCE IS CLEAR: DIRTY FARM WATER IS MAKING US SICK

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
25,121
31,272
1,743
oklahoma city
#1
William Whitt suffered violent diarrhea for days. But once he began vomiting blood, he knew it was time to rush to the hospital. His body swelled up so much that his wife thought he looked like the Michelin Man, and on the inside, his intestines were inflamed and bleeding.

For four days last spring, doctors struggled to control the infection that was ravaging Whitt, a father of three in western Idaho. The pain was excruciating, even though he was given opioid painkillers intravenously every 10 minutes for days.

His family feared they would lose him

“I was terrified. I wouldn’t leave the hospital because I wasn’t sure he was still going to be there when I got back,” said Whitt’s wife, Melinda.

Whitt and his family were baffled: How could a healthy 37-year-old suddenly get so sick? While he was fighting for his life, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention quizzed Whitt, seeking information about what had sickened him.

Finally, the agency’s second call offered a clue: “They kept drilling me about salad,” Whitt recalled. Before he fell ill, he had eaten two salads from a pizza shop.



The culprit turned out to be E. coli, a powerful pathogen that had contaminated romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, and distributed nationwide. At least 210 people in 36 states were sickened. Five died and 27 suffered kidney failure. The same strain of E. coli that sickened them was detected in a Yuma canal used to irrigate some crops.

For more than a decade, it’s been clear that there’s a gaping hole in American food safety: Growers aren’t required to test their irrigation water for pathogens such as E. coli. As a result, contaminated water can end up on fruits and vegetables.

After several high-profile disease outbreaks linked to food, Congress in 2011 ordered a fix, and produce growers this year would have begun testing their water under rules crafted by the Obama administration’s Food and Drug Administration.

But six months before people were sickened by the contaminated romaine, President Donald Trump’s FDA – responding to pressure from the farm industry and Trump’s order to eliminate regulations – shelved the water-testing rules for at least four years.


The culprit turned out to be E. coli, a powerful pathogen that had contaminated romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, and distributed nationwide. At least 210 people in 36 states were sickened. Five died and 27 suffered kidney failure. The same strain of E. coli that sickened them was detected in a Yuma canal used to irrigate some crops.

For more than a decade, it’s been clear that there’s a gaping hole in American food safety: Growers aren’t required to test their irrigation water for pathogens such as E. coli. As a result, contaminated water can end up on fruits and vegetables.

After several high-profile disease outbreaks linked to food, Congress in 2011 ordered a fix, and produce growers this year would have begun testing their water under rules crafted by the Obama administration’s Food and Drug Administration.

But six months before people were sickened by the contaminated romaine, President Donald Trump’s FDA – responding to pressure from the farm industry and Trump’s order to eliminate regulations – shelved the water-testing rules for at least four years.

Whitt’s lettuce would have been covered by those agreements. But his story illustrates the limits of a voluntary safety program and how lethal E. coli can be even when precautions are taken by farms and processors.

Farm groups contend that water testing is too expensive and should not apply to produce such as apples or onions, which are less likely to carry pathogens.

“I think the whole thing is an overblown attempt to exert government power over us,” said Bob Allen, a Washington state apple farmer.

While postponing the water-testing rules would save growers $12 million per year, it also would cost consumers $108 million per year in medical expenses, according to an FDA analysis.

For Whitt and his family, his illness has been traumatic as well as costly. After returning home from his nine-day hospital stay, he relied on narcotic painkillers for about six weeks. The infection caused a hernia and tore holes in the lining of his stomach that surgeons had to patch with mesh. Five months later, he still has numbness from the surgery and diarrhea every week.

Whitt and his wife said it is irresponsible for the FDA to postpone the water-testing requirements when officials knew that people like Whitt could pay a hefty price.

“People should be able to know that the food they’re buying is not going to harm them and their loved ones,” Melinda Whitt said. “At this point, we question everything that goes into our mouths.”


https://www.wired.com/story/the-sci...2t5pCAIEKAS1Uu2fCdRxBNrJ0XMfrKRnGMgRDPa9gTbdM
 

sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
A/V Subscriber
Oct 18, 2006
8,776
7,619
1,743
Fairfield, CT
#2
William Whitt suffered violent diarrhea for days. But once he began vomiting blood, he knew it was time to rush to the hospital. His body swelled up so much that his wife thought he looked like the Michelin Man, and on the inside, his intestines were inflamed and bleeding.
I sh*t you not: same thing happened to me the other night after eating Indian. It was insane. I got better once I pooed.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
66,776
48,235
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
#3
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5694878/

Food Sci Nutr. 2017 Nov; 5(6): 1215–1220.
Published online 2017 Sep 20. doi: [10.1002/fsn3.514]
PMCID: PMC5694878
PMID: 29188050
Effects of household washing on bacterial load and removal of Escherichia coli from lettuce and “ready-to-eat” salads
Elisabeth Uhlig, 1 Crister Olsson, 2 Jiayi He, 1 Therese Stark, 1 Zuzanna Sadowska, 1 Göran Molin, 1 Siv Ahrné, 1 Beatrix Alsanius, 2 and Åsa Håkanssoncorresponding author 1
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract
Customer demands for fresh salads are increasing, but leafy green vegetables have also been linked to food-borne illness due to pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. As a safety measure, consumers often wash leafy vegetables in water before consumption. In this study, we analyzed the efficiency of household washing to reduce the bacterial content. Romaine lettuce and ready-to-eat mixed salad were washed several times in flowing water at different rates and by immersing the leaves in water. Lettuce was also inoculated with E. coli before washing. Only washing in a high flow rate (8 L/min) resulted in statistically significant reductions (p < .05), “Total aerobic count” was reduced by 80%, and Enterobacteriaceae count was reduced by 68% after the first rinse. The number of contaminating E. coli was not significantly reduced. The dominating part of the culturable microbiota of the washed lettuce was identified by rRNA 16S sequencing of randomly picked colonies. The majority belonged to Pseudomonadaceae, but isolates from Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceaceae were also frequently found. This study shows the inefficiency of tap water washing methods available for the consumer when it comes to removal of bacteria from lettuce. Even after washing, the lettuce contained high levels of bacteria that in a high dose and under certain circumstances may constitute a health risk.

Keywords: E. coli, leafy green vegetables, ready-to-eat, rinsing, water bath

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5071777/

Front Microbiol. 2016; 7: 1663.
Published online 2016 Oct 20. doi: [10.3389/fmicb.2016.01663]
PMCID: PMC5071777
PMID: 27812356
Effectiveness of Washing Procedures in Reducing Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes on a Raw Leafy Green Vegetable (Eruca vesicaria)
Alessandra Pezzuto,1,† Simone Belluco,2,3,† Carmen Losasso,2,* Ilaria Patuzzi,2,4 Paola Bordin,2 Alessia Piovesana,1 Damiano Comin,1 Renzo Mioni,1 and Antonia Ricci2
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract
Vegetables are an important source of nutrients, but they can host a large microbial population, particularly bacteria. Foodborne pathogens can contaminate raw vegetables at any stage of their production process with a potential for human infection. Appropriate washing can mitigate the risk of foodborne illness consequent to vegetable consumption by reducing pathogen levels, but few data are available to assess the efficacy of different practices. In the present work, six different washing methods, in the presence or absence of sanitisers (peracetic acid and percitric acid, sodium bicarbonate, sodium hypochlorite) and vinegar, were tested for their effectiveness in reducing Salmonella and Listeria counts after artificial contamination of raw rocket (Eruca vesicaria). Results showed that washing with sodium hypochlorite (200 mg/L) was the only method able to produce a significant 2 Log reduction of Salmonella counts, but only in the case of high initial contamination (7 Log CFU/g), suggesting potential harmful effects for consumers could occur. In the case of Listeria monocytogenes, all the examined washing methods were effective, with 200 mg/L sodium hypochlorite solution and a solution of peracetic and percitric acids displaying the best performances (2 and 1.5 Log reductions, respectively). This highlights the importance of targeting consumers on fit for purpose and safe washing practices to circumvent vegetable contamination by foodborne pathogens.

Keywords: consumer phase, food safety, fresh produce, microbiological risk, Salmonella, Listeria
 

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
25,121
31,272
1,743
oklahoma city
#4
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5694878/

Food Sci Nutr. 2017 Nov; 5(6): 1215–1220.
Published online 2017 Sep 20. doi: [10.1002/fsn3.514]
PMCID: PMC5694878
PMID: 29188050
Effects of household washing on bacterial load and removal of Escherichia coli from lettuce and “ready-to-eat” salads
Elisabeth Uhlig, 1 Crister Olsson, 2 Jiayi He, 1 Therese Stark, 1 Zuzanna Sadowska, 1 Göran Molin, 1 Siv Ahrné, 1 Beatrix Alsanius, 2 and Åsa Håkanssoncorresponding author 1
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract
Customer demands for fresh salads are increasing, but leafy green vegetables have also been linked to food-borne illness due to pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. As a safety measure, consumers often wash leafy vegetables in water before consumption. In this study, we analyzed the efficiency of household washing to reduce the bacterial content. Romaine lettuce and ready-to-eat mixed salad were washed several times in flowing water at different rates and by immersing the leaves in water. Lettuce was also inoculated with E. coli before washing. Only washing in a high flow rate (8 L/min) resulted in statistically significant reductions (p < .05), “Total aerobic count” was reduced by 80%, and Enterobacteriaceae count was reduced by 68% after the first rinse. The number of contaminating E. coli was not significantly reduced. The dominating part of the culturable microbiota of the washed lettuce was identified by rRNA 16S sequencing of randomly picked colonies. The majority belonged to Pseudomonadaceae, but isolates from Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceaceae were also frequently found. This study shows the inefficiency of tap water washing methods available for the consumer when it comes to removal of bacteria from lettuce. Even after washing, the lettuce contained high levels of bacteria that in a high dose and under certain circumstances may constitute a health risk.

Keywords: E. coli, leafy green vegetables, ready-to-eat, rinsing, water bath

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5071777/

Front Microbiol. 2016; 7: 1663.
Published online 2016 Oct 20. doi: [10.3389/fmicb.2016.01663]
PMCID: PMC5071777
PMID: 27812356
Effectiveness of Washing Procedures in Reducing Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes on a Raw Leafy Green Vegetable (Eruca vesicaria)
Alessandra Pezzuto,1,† Simone Belluco,2,3,† Carmen Losasso,2,* Ilaria Patuzzi,2,4 Paola Bordin,2 Alessia Piovesana,1 Damiano Comin,1 Renzo Mioni,1 and Antonia Ricci2
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract
Vegetables are an important source of nutrients, but they can host a large microbial population, particularly bacteria. Foodborne pathogens can contaminate raw vegetables at any stage of their production process with a potential for human infection. Appropriate washing can mitigate the risk of foodborne illness consequent to vegetable consumption by reducing pathogen levels, but few data are available to assess the efficacy of different practices. In the present work, six different washing methods, in the presence or absence of sanitisers (peracetic acid and percitric acid, sodium bicarbonate, sodium hypochlorite) and vinegar, were tested for their effectiveness in reducing Salmonella and Listeria counts after artificial contamination of raw rocket (Eruca vesicaria). Results showed that washing with sodium hypochlorite (200 mg/L) was the only method able to produce a significant 2 Log reduction of Salmonella counts, but only in the case of high initial contamination (7 Log CFU/g), suggesting potential harmful effects for consumers could occur. In the case of Listeria monocytogenes, all the examined washing methods were effective, with 200 mg/L sodium hypochlorite solution and a solution of peracetic and percitric acids displaying the best performances (2 and 1.5 Log reductions, respectively). This highlights the importance of targeting consumers on fit for purpose and safe washing practices to circumvent vegetable contamination by foodborne pathogens.

Keywords: consumer phase, food safety, fresh produce, microbiological risk, Salmonella, Listeria
Basically saying that the consumer can't fix the farmer's problem.

I'm all for the removal of stupid regulation. But, it seems around here that often the word regulation is considered blasphemy. There are those situations where it is a necessary evil. I don't want to buy poop water lettuce.
 

Duke Silver

Find safe haven in a warm bathtub full of my jazz.
A/V Subscriber
Sep 17, 2004
25,732
13,506
1,743
Cozy's Bar
#5
Basically saying that the consumer can't fix the farmer's problem.

I'm all for the removal of stupid regulation. But, it seems around here that often the word regulation is considered blasphemy. There are those situations where it is a necessary evil. I don't want to buy poop water lettuce.
That is what you buy when you buy organic lettuce.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
52,175
18,064
1,743
#6
I think the issue for many are regulations which are driven by activists based on unfounded fear, and or stupid regulations.

Regulations should be based on sound science. I'm not famaliar with all the issues here but based on the studies Rx posted it seems there needs to be some serious review and action taken to safeguard consumer health.

For an industry to ignore the issue in the long term does them more financial harm than good.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
52,175
18,064
1,743
#7
William Whitt suffered violent diarrhea for days. But once he began vomiting blood, he knew it was time to rush to the hospital. His body swelled up so much that his wife thought he looked like the Michelin Man, and on the inside, his intestines were inflamed and bleeding.

For four days last spring, doctors struggled to control the infection that was ravaging Whitt, a father of three in western Idaho. The pain was excruciating, even though he was given opioid painkillers intravenously every 10 minutes for days.

His family feared they would lose him

“I was terrified. I wouldn’t leave the hospital because I wasn’t sure he was still going to be there when I got back,” said Whitt’s wife, Melinda.

Whitt and his family were baffled: How could a healthy 37-year-old suddenly get so sick? While he was fighting for his life, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention quizzed Whitt, seeking information about what had sickened him.

Finally, the agency’s second call offered a clue: “They kept drilling me about salad,” Whitt recalled. Before he fell ill, he had eaten two salads from a pizza shop.



The culprit turned out to be E. coli, a powerful pathogen that had contaminated romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, and distributed nationwide. At least 210 people in 36 states were sickened. Five died and 27 suffered kidney failure. The same strain of E. coli that sickened them was detected in a Yuma canal used to irrigate some crops.

For more than a decade, it’s been clear that there’s a gaping hole in American food safety: Growers aren’t required to test their irrigation water for pathogens such as E. coli. As a result, contaminated water can end up on fruits and vegetables.

After several high-profile disease outbreaks linked to food, Congress in 2011 ordered a fix, and produce growers this year would have begun testing their water under rules crafted by the Obama administration’s Food and Drug Administration.

But six months before people were sickened by the contaminated romaine, President Donald Trump’s FDA – responding to pressure from the farm industry and Trump’s order to eliminate regulations – shelved the water-testing rules for at least four years.

The culprit turned out to be E. coli, a powerful pathogen that had contaminated romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, and distributed nationwide. At least 210 people in 36 states were sickened. Five died and 27 suffered kidney failure. The same strain of E. coli that sickened them was detected in a Yuma canal used to irrigate some crops.

For more than a decade, it’s been clear that there’s a gaping hole in American food safety: Growers aren’t required to test their irrigation water for pathogens such as E. coli. As a result, contaminated water can end up on fruits and vegetables.

After several high-profile disease outbreaks linked to food, Congress in 2011 ordered a fix, and produce growers this year would have begun testing their water under rules crafted by the Obama administration’s Food and Drug Administration.

But six months before people were sickened by the contaminated romaine, President Donald Trump’s FDA – responding to pressure from the farm industry and Trump’s order to eliminate regulations – shelved the water-testing rules for at least four years.

Whitt’s lettuce would have been covered by those agreements. But his story illustrates the limits of a voluntary safety program and how lethal E. coli can be even when precautions are taken by farms and processors.

Farm groups contend that water testing is too expensive and should not apply to produce such as apples or onions, which are less likely to carry pathogens.

“I think the whole thing is an overblown attempt to exert government power over us,” said Bob Allen, a Washington state apple farmer.

While postponing the water-testing rules would save growers $12 million per year, it also would cost consumers $108 million per year in medical expenses, according to an FDA analysis.

For Whitt and his family, his illness has been traumatic as well as costly. After returning home from his nine-day hospital stay, he relied on narcotic painkillers for about six weeks. The infection caused a hernia and tore holes in the lining of his stomach that surgeons had to patch with mesh. Five months later, he still has numbness from the surgery and diarrhea every week.

Whitt and his wife said it is irresponsible for the FDA to postpone the water-testing requirements when officials knew that people like Whitt could pay a hefty price.

“People should be able to know that the food they’re buying is not going to harm them and their loved ones,” Melinda Whitt said. “At this point, we question everything that goes into our mouths.”


https://www.wired.com/story/the-sci...2t5pCAIEKAS1Uu2fCdRxBNrJ0XMfrKRnGMgRDPa9gTbdM
Did I miss it, what was the source of the irrigation water?

I recall a case (I believe it was in South Carolina) i heard from a speaker one time about contaminated well water. it was a residence which had tested their water and it was highly contaminated. The local news media was blaming it on agriculture. Finally, one of the investigators was walking the property and found and old abandoned hand dug well where the family was discarding their trash. The hole was full of all sorts of household chemicals which was leaking into the ground area around the well.

Testing the water for contaminants only identifies a problem, it doesn't solve the problem.
 

Donnyboy

Lettin' the high times carry the low....
A/V Subscriber
Oct 31, 2005
22,060
21,294
1,743
#9
Answer: Don't eat lettuce. It is worthless as a food.

Eat only delicious items waters with poop water.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
66,776
48,235
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
#10
Basically saying that the consumer can't fix the farmer's problem.

I'm all for the removal of stupid regulation. But, it seems around here that often the word regulation is considered blasphemy. There are those situations where it is a necessary evil. I don't want to buy poop water lettuce.
Yep. When I saw your article I thought, "What if you just washed the food?" Then I looked for data. Once it's contaminated it looks like you have to bleach it (sodium hypochlorite) or blast it with high pressure (higher than you can generate in your sink) to get it clean. In other words, once it has poop water on it you're pretty much screwed.

This would seem to be a necessary regulation.
 

Pokey

Sheriff
Sep 13, 2013
4,956
1,167
743
Left field
#11
Perhaps porta potties in the fields and bathroom breaks would help also. Let's be honest here, when you gotta go.....kick dirt over it and keep working. Gross, but positive it happens regularly.
 

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
25,121
31,272
1,743
oklahoma city
#12
Perhaps porta potties in the fields and bathroom breaks would help also. Let's be honest here, when you gotta go.....kick dirt over it and keep working. Gross, but positive it happens regularly.
I'm no expert but likely not the cause of the problem. Irrigation water would be much more likely to be contaminated by livestock or distant sources.
 
Last edited:

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
25,121
31,272
1,743
oklahoma city
#20
Here's another one: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/13/han...7zGqKLjY2TuzzEChKSuw_Jx7dyIXmf3AxJUf1enslvnag

Those "green" hand dryers in bathrooms simply blow fecal matter and bacteria all over your hands. Paper towels are cleaner.
Seems those could have an easy redesign with some sort of better compartment with a vacuum and reservoir rather than just blowing it everywhere.

Seems a flaw in the study that they didn't see if the just washed hands were the source of the bacteria. Most people do not wash in a manner that would actually remove the crevice bacteria that get blasted by a rush of air.