Taylor grand jury: 1 officer indicted

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May 31, 2007
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The article from USA Today about the 8 myths is from the Louisville Journal. It is a very condensed version of the multiple part multiple day investigative story they did.
You don’t deserve to die for being involved with the drug trade, but lots of anecdotal evidence she was involved. And heavily involved with a felon.
I posted that 8 myths from the LCJ several weeks ago. So I was a little bit ahead of the curve and have noticed the constant intentional misleading of people by the MSM.
 
May 31, 2007
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So what exactly are you saying here?


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I believe he’s saying that the media has tried to gloss over her involvement with a criminal and with criminal activity to bolster their narrative. But that it wasn’t necessary because just being involved in those things doesn’t mean you deserve to die. It’s much like the portrayal of her being killed while asleep in her bed when she was actually shot while standing in the hallway. It really shouldn’t make a difference but a picture is being painted rather than the truth being told. The intent is to get a certain emotional response from people.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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So what exactly are you saying here?


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I wasnt trying to be cryptic. I am stating there is a lot of supporting evidence as to why there was a warrant to enter the home and look for drugs.
Being involved with drugs should not and is not a life sentence. However, the police were there for a reason and when they entered they were fired upon. Those two facts are not in dispute.
 

llcoolw

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Feb 7, 2005
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Ironically I think the grand jury got it right for the most part. The officer who was charged should have been, but I think it is wrong that none of the charges involved shooting into Taylor’s apartment. I think there should be people up the ladder who should be charged and/or fired, leadership failed the officers not charged as well as Taylor and her family.
This right here. We are blaming the police for doing their jobs and following the law and state provided training. If we are going to really fix this then lawyers, judges and especially the politicians should be held accountable. Not just for the lives lost but also for the millions upon millions of dollars being handed out in police brutality lawsuits. Why should my tax climb higher because a an officer did what they were taught to do? And then my taxes go higher because of mob rage and destruction. Freaking sucks for everyone except those truly responsible. Bonus: we should hold journalists and news agencies and celebrities accountable for their roles as well.
 

llcoolw

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The misinformation about the case is incredible. This is an example of why I rant about MSM. People that follow CNN aren’t educated about the facts of the case and are grossly misinformed. The Louisville Journal did a phenomenal job uncovering the true facts of the case.
Local news seems to be the best news in the internet age.
 

llcoolw

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Feb 7, 2005
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The conversation about death being earned or not is a new one. Being involved in the drug trade doesn’t deserve to be murdered? Deserve has nothing to do with it. The world isn’t fair. In Texas, citizens are within their rights to shoot unknown property trespassers stealing property. Is a car worth murder? In Texas it is. Is an argument worth murder? In Oklahoma it is. A enraged mans wife ran out of their home crying to a neighbor. The husband pursued her into the neighbors home. Home owner didn’t know him and killed him. Completely legal. So the question of “Do they deserve to be murdered?” is the wrong question. The correct question is “Why is this person ignoring the law and forcing someone else to respond?” If our latest story was asked this question before it happened, our victim could’ve decided not to associate with people (drug dealer) who ignore the law and force others to respond. Most, if not every one of these police stories, start with someone ignoring the law.
 
Apr 12, 2020
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Stillwater
So what exactly are you saying here?


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I wasnt trying to be cryptic. I am stating there is a lot of supporting evidence as to why there was a warrant to enter the home and look for drugs.
Being involved with drugs should not and is not a life sentence. However, the police were there for a reason and when they entered they were fired upon. Those two facts are not in dispute.
I don’t think I agree with you that there’s “a lot of supporting evidence” that she was involved. From what I understand there’s essentially 2 big pieces of evidence and they’re both sketchy and easily explained. I think the threshold should be much higher, especially for a NKW which it actually does outline by law that the threshold should be higher.

Let’s keep in mind that the police were, in fact, wrong about what they hypothesized and I don’t think that’s because this is an outlier of 1% of times that cops were wrong about a warrant. The system is too lax giving the things out.


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Last edited:
Apr 12, 2020
270
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Stillwater
So what exactly are you saying here?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I believe he’s saying that the media has tried to gloss over her involvement with a criminal and with criminal activity to bolster their narrative. But that it wasn’t necessary because just being involved in those things doesn’t mean you deserve to die. It’s much like the portrayal of her being killed while asleep in her bed when she was actually shot while standing in the hallway. It really shouldn’t make a difference but a picture is being painted rather than the truth being told. The intent is to get a certain emotional response from people.
But her criminal involvement was negligible anyway.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Apr 12, 2020
270
84
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25
Stillwater
Ironically I think the grand jury got it right for the most part. The officer who was charged should have been, but I think it is wrong that none of the charges involved shooting into Taylor’s apartment. I think there should be people up the ladder who should be charged and/or fired, leadership failed the officers not charged as well as Taylor and her family.
This right here. We are blaming the police for doing their jobs and following the law and state provided training. If we are going to really fix this then lawyers, judges and especially the politicians should be held accountable. Not just for the lives lost but also for the millions upon millions of dollars being handed out in police brutality lawsuits. Why should my tax climb higher because a an officer did what they were taught to do? And then my taxes go higher because of mob rage and destruction. Freaking sucks for everyone except those truly responsible. Bonus: we should hold journalists and news agencies and celebrities accountable for their roles as well.
Well, I’d like a more responsibility from the cops who are asking the judges to sign these warrants on nickels and dimes (and much stricter punishments for cops that are found lying in their reports) but I agree the buck really stops with the judges who sign.


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Mar 11, 2006
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I don’t think I agree with you that there’s “a lot of supporting evidence” that she was involved. From what I understand there’s essentially 2 big pieces of evidence and they’re both sketchy and easily explained.


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Seems a lot more than 2. And how are they easily explained?

*Police followed her and her drug dealer ex-boyfriend for months.
*She and her ex-boyfriend showed up at a drug den together and left with a package. They were spotted not be the officers tracking the ex-boyfriend, but by officers watching the noted drug house. This was exactly 30 days before the day she died
* The car they drove to the drug den was a white Impala register to Taylor. It was seen parked in front of the drug den “several times”
*She bailed her ex-boyfriend out of jail three different times. She visited him several times. She posted bond as rentals as Dec 2019 for him and his friend.
*Call records show they spoke on the phone several times this year.
He had packages mailed to her house.
* The ex-boyfriend called Taylor’s cell 27 different times from jail
* Car tracking device shows the drug dealer was at her house 6 times the month prior
* A recorded call quoted the exboyfriend drug dealer saying Taylor had $8k of his money. And that she “handled his money”
* Taylor herself was caught on a recorded call in January saying her ex-boyfriends friend was “at the trap”. (trap is slang for drug house)
 
May 31, 2007
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440
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Edmond, OK
The conversation about death being earned or not is a new one. Being involved in the drug trade doesn’t deserve to be murdered? Deserve has nothing to do with it. The world isn’t fair. In Texas, citizens are within their rights to shoot unknown property trespassers stealing property. Is a car worth murder? In Texas it is. Is an argument worth murder? In Oklahoma it is. A enraged mans wife ran out of their home crying to a neighbor. The husband pursued her into the neighbors home. Home owner didn’t know him and killed him. Completely legal. So the question of “Do they deserve to be murdered?” is the wrong question. The correct question is “Why is this person ignoring the law and forcing someone else to respond?” If our latest story was asked this question before it happened, our victim could’ve decided not to associate with people (drug dealer) who ignore the law and force others to respond. Most, if not every one of these police stories, start with someone ignoring the law.
It’s not about deserve for sure. It really is about risk.
But her criminal involvement was negligible anyway.


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I don’t know that I would call getting your name put on a warrant “negligible”.

This article shows how involved she was. Certainly enough to be a person of interest:
https://www.courier-journal.com/sto...rcibly-search-breonna-taylor-home/5593502002/
 
Apr 12, 2020
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Stillwater
I don’t think I agree with you that there’s “a lot of supporting evidence” that she was involved. From what I understand there’s essentially 2 big pieces of evidence and they’re both sketchy and easily explained.


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Seems a lot more than 2. And how are they easily explained?

*Police followed her and her drug dealer ex-boyfriend for months.
*She and her ex-boyfriend showed up at a drug den together and left with a package. They were spotted not be the officers tracking the ex-boyfriend, but by officers watching the noted drug house. This was exactly 30 days before the day she died
* The car they drove to the drug den was a white Impala register to Taylor. It was seen parked in front of the drug den “several times”
*She bailed her ex-boyfriend out of jail three different times. She visited him several times. She posted bond as rentals as Dec 2019 for him and his friend.
*Call records show they spoke on the phone several times this year.
He had packages mailed to her house.
* The ex-boyfriend called Taylor’s cell 27 different times from jail
* Car tracking device shows the drug dealer was at her house 6 times the month prior
* A recorded call quoted the exboyfriend drug dealer saying Taylor had $8k of his money. And that she “handled his money”
* Taylor herself was caught on a recorded call in January saying her ex-boyfriends friend was “at the trap”. (trap is slang for drug house)
Yeah the reporting I saw says she wasn’t there. He left the house with something and then went directly to a drug den. I haven’t seen anything about her or her car being at the drug den.


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Apr 12, 2020
270
84
28
25
Stillwater
The conversation about death being earned or not is a new one. Being involved in the drug trade doesn’t deserve to be murdered? Deserve has nothing to do with it. The world isn’t fair. In Texas, citizens are within their rights to shoot unknown property trespassers stealing property. Is a car worth murder? In Texas it is. Is an argument worth murder? In Oklahoma it is. A enraged mans wife ran out of their home crying to a neighbor. The husband pursued her into the neighbors home. Home owner didn’t know him and killed him. Completely legal. So the question of “Do they deserve to be murdered?” is the wrong question. The correct question is “Why is this person ignoring the law and forcing someone else to respond?” If our latest story was asked this question before it happened, our victim could’ve decided not to associate with people (drug dealer) who ignore the law and force others to respond. Most, if not every one of these police stories, start with someone ignoring the law.
It’s not about deserve for sure. It really is about risk.
But her criminal involvement was negligible anyway.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I don’t know that I would call getting your name put on a warrant “negligible”.

This article shows how involved she was. Certainly enough to be a person of interest:
https://www.courier-journal.com/sto...rcibly-search-breonna-taylor-home/5593502002/
I haven’t seen that article, I’ll check it out


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Jul 25, 2018
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I don’t think I agree with you that there’s “a lot of supporting evidence” that she was involved. From what I understand there’s essentially 2 big pieces of evidence and they’re both sketchy and easily explained. I think the threshold should be much higher, especially for a NKW which it actually does outline by law that the threshold should be higher.

Let’s keep in mind that the police were, in fact, wrong about what they hypothesized and I don’t think that’s because this is an outlier of 1% of times that cops were wrong about a warrant. The system is too lax giving the things out.


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Based upon what? Seems like a massive generalization there.
 

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Jostate

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I wasnt trying to be cryptic. I am stating there is a lot of supporting evidence as to why there was a warrant to enter the home and look for drugs.
Being involved with drugs should not and is not a life sentence. However, the police were there for a reason and when they entered they were fired upon. Those two facts are not in dispute.
I haven't paid as much attention to this one but it's tough for me. I see it a little like the Waco thing, there might be good reason to go get someone but isn't there a better way to do it? They may have knocked but I suspect they didn't waste much time busting in. What would you do if someone busted in your house in the middle of the night?
 
Mar 11, 2006
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I haven't paid as much attention to this one but it's tough for me. I see it a little like the Waco thing, there might be good reason to go get someone but isn't there a better way to do it? They may have knocked but I suspect they didn't waste much time busting in. What would you do if someone busted in your house in the middle of the night?
There probably is a better way. But that decision is not on the 3 police officers. They were following orders executing their warrant. Justice doesn’t necessarily mean someone should be charged.