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PontiacPoke717

Sheriff
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Nov 24, 2014
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Thought it was interesting that OSU took a grad transfer at the WR position. Then I realized that Tracin Wallace football career could possibly be over, LC Greenwood changed positions, and McKaufman is coming off a knee injury. What you guys think?
I still think he will be buried on the depth chart. Behind Moore, McKaufman and even Shepherd.

Shepherd is an interesting prospect moving forward for me. I was high on Greenwood's ceiling and bummed he switched positions but I get it. Depending on what Tylan does after this season, we could have 2 guys playing X and Y that are both 6'4+ with blazing speed.
 
Feb 27, 2018
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ICYMI - Guerin Emig's weekend column on college football transfers quotes Mike Gundy, Les Miles and others...

Les Miles, Kansas: “The ease of transfer, I think it’s wonderful for the player, I don’t know that it’s great for the coaches.”

Miles’ statement was the most honest thing I heard on the topic. He’s right. It isn’t great for the coaches. It isn’t easy for them, since they had so much of the power before last June.

But these guys are paid ridiculous money and have ample support staff. They can find ways to make it work.

Gundy: “I think that there are a few things that are positive, but I think the majority of it is dangerous unless the NCAA changes the opportunity for coaches to manage roster numbers based on the 85 scholarships that we have. As it is right now we can’t handle the roster changes. We can’t predict them and we can’t make up for them based on the way the rules are.

“They (NCAA) have failed to address ways for us to manage our roster based on the current portal situation.”
 
Feb 27, 2018
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Tulsa
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From Guerin Emig...

The last time we analyzed Big 12 nonconference football schedules was 2016.

Playing attractive September games seemed pretty important at the time for two primary reasons: the College Football Playoff committee’s use of “strength of schedule” in separating comparable playoff contenders, and athletic directors’ need to give fans a reason to keep buying tickets in a comforts-of-home age.

Three years later the playoff committee still weighs strength of schedule and ADs still battle attendance concerns. According to a recent CBSSports.com report, the Big 12’s average home crowd in 2018 (56,490) was the league’s lowest since 2003.

That’s enough rationale for the Big 12 to keep beefing up non-conference scheduling. Here’s more: The Big 12 has flexed some considerable muscle since 2016.

Oklahoma has beaten Ohio State and made two playoff semifinals. Texas has beaten Notre Dame and USC and won a Sugar Bowl over Georgia.

West Virginia has beaten Tennessee and Missouri. TCU has beaten Arkansas and held its own against Ohio State.

Oklahoma State has gone 3-0 in bowls. Kansas State has beaten Texas A&M and UCLA in bowls. Baylor has beaten Vanderbilt and Boise State in bowls.

The Big 12’s bowl record over the past three years is 13-8. Not bad for a conference once considered the Marlon Jackson of the Power 5.