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PontiacPoke717

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Thought it was interesting that OSU took a grad transfer at the WR position. Then I realized that Tracin Wallace football career could possibly be over, LC Greenwood changed positions, and McKaufman is coming off a knee injury. What you guys think?
I still think he will be buried on the depth chart. Behind Moore, McKaufman and even Shepherd.

Shepherd is an interesting prospect moving forward for me. I was high on Greenwood's ceiling and bummed he switched positions but I get it. Depending on what Tylan does after this season, we could have 2 guys playing X and Y that are both 6'4+ with blazing speed.
 
Feb 27, 2018
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ICYMI - Guerin Emig's weekend column on college football transfers quotes Mike Gundy, Les Miles and others...

Les Miles, Kansas: “The ease of transfer, I think it’s wonderful for the player, I don’t know that it’s great for the coaches.”

Miles’ statement was the most honest thing I heard on the topic. He’s right. It isn’t great for the coaches. It isn’t easy for them, since they had so much of the power before last June.

But these guys are paid ridiculous money and have ample support staff. They can find ways to make it work.

Gundy: “I think that there are a few things that are positive, but I think the majority of it is dangerous unless the NCAA changes the opportunity for coaches to manage roster numbers based on the 85 scholarships that we have. As it is right now we can’t handle the roster changes. We can’t predict them and we can’t make up for them based on the way the rules are.

“They (NCAA) have failed to address ways for us to manage our roster based on the current portal situation.”
 
Feb 27, 2018
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From Guerin Emig...

The last time we analyzed Big 12 nonconference football schedules was 2016.

Playing attractive September games seemed pretty important at the time for two primary reasons: the College Football Playoff committee’s use of “strength of schedule” in separating comparable playoff contenders, and athletic directors’ need to give fans a reason to keep buying tickets in a comforts-of-home age.

Three years later the playoff committee still weighs strength of schedule and ADs still battle attendance concerns. According to a recent CBSSports.com report, the Big 12’s average home crowd in 2018 (56,490) was the league’s lowest since 2003.

That’s enough rationale for the Big 12 to keep beefing up non-conference scheduling. Here’s more: The Big 12 has flexed some considerable muscle since 2016.

Oklahoma has beaten Ohio State and made two playoff semifinals. Texas has beaten Notre Dame and USC and won a Sugar Bowl over Georgia.

West Virginia has beaten Tennessee and Missouri. TCU has beaten Arkansas and held its own against Ohio State.

Oklahoma State has gone 3-0 in bowls. Kansas State has beaten Texas A&M and UCLA in bowls. Baylor has beaten Vanderbilt and Boise State in bowls.

The Big 12’s bowl record over the past three years is 13-8. Not bad for a conference once considered the Marlon Jackson of the Power 5.
 
Feb 27, 2018
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Today is officially 100 days until OSU's kickoff of the 2019 season. In honor of this, here's how to follow OSU players and coaches on Twitter/Instagram,

and a column from Bill Haisten...

At the front end of preseason camps, media coverage will center on the quarterbacks. It always does, even when there is an experienced guy at the position. This year, for sure, there will be quarterback storylines.

The Sooners and Cowboys will be driven by new QBs. For the Golden Hurricane, there might be a new starter — if Baylor transfer Zach Smith can unseat TU’s 2018 starter, Seth Boomer.

As OU, OSU and TU grind through August, this is what I’ll monitor more intently: the status of each program’s defense. There are new coordinators at OU (Alex Grinch) and TU (Joseph Gillespie). At OSU, Jim Knowles is preparing for his second season.

The best support for a new QB — and even for a talented, accomplished veteran like OU’s Jalen Hurts — is a run game that ranges from dependable to dynamic, and a defense that can be a factor in recording victories.
A defense that is more of a help than a hindrance.

A defense that gives you a chance instead of a headache.
 
Feb 27, 2018
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From Bill Haisten: College Football HOF expectation is OSU’s deserving Leslie O’Neal again is snubbed

Will O’Neal make the cut this time? Finally? Doubtful.

He came up short after having been on the College Football HOF ballot in 2016, 2017 and 2018. Obviously, too many voters haven’t done the required research on his dominance as a Cowboy.

Still OSU’s career sacks leader with 34, O’Neal was an All-American in 1984 and 1985. In 1984, he was voted the Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year. That same season, Brian Bosworth and Tony Casillas played at OU.

That’s a media presentation of the O’Neal qualifications.

If any voter has questions about either nominee, they should consider comments from Pat Jones. Jones coached O’Neal at OSU.

Jones on O’Neal: “Depending on where you put Bob Fenimore, O’Neal is either the third- or fourth-best player ever at Oklahoma State. The first two are (Barry) Sanders and (Thurman) Thomas.”

...

O’Neal and Jones attended the same high school — Hall High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Recruited by then-Cowboys assistant Butch Davis, O’Neal signed with OSU after having strongly considered UCLA.

“(O’Neal) could probably play anywhere on the field, and I mean anywhere,” then-OSU coach Jimmy Johnson told The Oklahoman before the 1983 season, “but he’s going to be so dominating on the line.”

After a 14-10 loss to top-ranked Nebraska in 1983, O’Neal’s reputation began to blossom within the Big Eight region and then nationally. Against a Huskers squad considered to have been among the best in college football history, he was the best player on the field.

“I think it’s safe to say that through the decade of the ’80s,” Jones said, “O’Neal and (North Carolina’s) Lawrence Taylor were the two best pass-rushers in college football. O’Neal was dominant.”
 
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Feb 27, 2018
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From Bill Haisten...

For most of 10 years – 1999-2009 – Oklahoma State’s arena-and-stadium property was a construction zone.

As the Tulsa architect who had “The Big Idea” to build a new Gallagher-Iba Arena over the top of the old Gallagher-Iba Arena, and who followed with most of the design of the sensationally renovated Boone Pickens Stadium, Gary Sparks was at the center of a movement that forever changed OSU athletics.

Having had time to examine the scope of such massive projects, Sparks was motivated to write “Game Changer,” a 162-page coffee-table book that revisits every aspect of the Oklahoma State process.

“Not very many people know the real story,” Sparks says.

Country music superstar Garth Brooks, an OSU graduate, penned the “Game Changer” foreword.

“It makes sense,” Brooks wrote, “that the heart and soul of the campus are Gallagher-Iba Arena and Boone Pickens Stadium.”
 
Feb 27, 2018
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From Bill Haisten: As Mike Gundy adjusts retirement timeline, OSU may get two bonus seasons

My April 28, 2015 conversation with Mike Gundy was among the better Q&A sessions he and I had in my 2004-11 and 2014-15 time as the Oklahoma State beat writer. At that time, Gundy’s age was 47 and he was a 10-year veteran of OSU’s head-coaching position.

...

Among additional revelations on 4/28/15 was that Gundy felt refreshed and planned to coach for 10 more seasons. After that, presumably, he would retire to a life of hunting, fishing and chores on his Stillwater ranch.

Last week, there was another Gundy interview -- this time, a 44-minute teleconference involving The Oklahoman’s Berry Tramel and me. I reminded Gundy of his “10 more seasons” statement on 4/28/15.
As time really does fly, four seasons have come and gone since that day.

If Gundy were still committed to that 10-year timeline, there would be six more seasons before someone else would coach the Cowboys. After the 2024 season, OSU could get started on a Gundy statue and finalizing the decision to put his name on the field: Mike Gundy Field at Boone Pickens Stadium.

During the 2019 season, Gundy will be 52. Last Friday, he indicated that he probably will coach until he turns 60 during the summer of 2027.

If he walks at 60, the 2026 season would be his 22nd and final season as the Oklahoma State head coach. He would have been the OSU head coach twice as long as any predecessor. Pat Jones (1994-2004) and Jim Lookabaugh (1939-49) each coached in Stillwater for 11 seasons.

EDIT: Also, here's a link to excerpts from a Q&A involving Oklahoma State football coach Mike Gundy, the Tulsa World’s Bill Haisten and The Oklahoman’s Berry Tramel

Haisten: The stadium renovation was completed 10 years ago and the indoor facility was finished in 2013. It’s been six years since there was anything of significance developed for football. What does the program need now?

Gundy: “We’re still trying to raise money to enhance recruiting — facilitate manpower, (raise) money for private air (and) things of that nature. We’ve pushed hard over the last year for that. ... Two, we had a 1,000 on the APR a year ago — a 100% graduation rate. Every player in the organization, based on their classification, was at percentage towards their degree program. Only five schools in the country did that. So, we need a new academic center. We’ve got a terrific academic center that was built, I want to say, about 15 or 20 years ago. Our athletic department in general — approximately 530 athletes — we’ve outgrown it. ... And I’m just starting to push right now toward a player recreation center in our end zone for our team.”
 
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