See...Oklahoma is business friendly.

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Jul 9, 2004
666
380
1,613
#1
[https://searchlightnm.org/fields-of-green/]

The new farms were operating with state-issued medical cannabis cultivation permits. Oklahoma’s cheap land, lax enforcement and miniscule tax rate ensured that they would be allowed to proceed in peace. Even if the farms were to get shut down in the future, he said, investors could be confident of turning a handsome profit in the short term.

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Last edited:

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
7,043
3,432
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
#2
[https://searchlightnm.org/fields-of-green/]

The new farms were operating with state-issued medical cannabis cultivation permits. Oklahoma’s cheap land, lax enforcement and miniscule tax rate ensured that they would be allowed to proceed in peace. Even if the farms were to get shut down in the future, he said, investors could be confident of turning a handsome profit in the short term.

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Good read and a good story on human adeptness. Nor should Oklahomans care if your businesses sell out of state. More tax revenue for you. But allowing recent transfers to come in and start morally abusing the system shouldn’t be allowed. Maybe a years worth of residency first. I like the law barring other states from selling their products in Oklahoma unless it’s made with Oklahoma weed. But you gotta stop dudes like the one in the story from screwing up the business for decent people. So far in my journeys among medical and fully legal states, Oklahoma is in first place in my humble opinion.
 
Nov 6, 2010
2,298
796
1,743
#3
So while we're on this subject, does anyone have any idea on why the FDA continues to list MJ as schedule 1? Seems like that is the big impediment to really wrapping all this ambiguity up.
 

Well

Cowboy
A/V Subscriber
Dec 17, 2009
909
340
1,613
#4
So while we're on this subject, does anyone have any idea on why the FDA continues to list MJ as schedule 1? Seems like that is the big impediment to really wrapping all this ambiguity up.
I don't believe it rests with the FDA. IIRC, marijuana is still part of the Comprehensive Substances Act. The portion dealing with pot will have to be repealed.
Just found this, interesting read. The House has passed to decriminalize.
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/co...historic-bill-decriminalize-cannabis-n1249905
 
Nov 6, 2010
2,298
796
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#5

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
7,043
3,432
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
#7
DEA Asks Federal Court To Dismiss Marijuana Rescheduling Lawsuit—Again
By Kyle Jaeger December 2, 2020
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is again asking a federal court to reject a case calling for a review of its decision not to reclassify marijuana under federal law.

In a brief filed with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Monday, the federal agency asserted that the suit is invalid because the plaintiffs in the case weren’t the ones to make the ultimately rejected rescheduling request in the first place and, they claimed, the petition lacked merit in any case.

Scientists and veterans sued the federal agency in May, arguing that the legal basis DEA has used to justify keeping cannabis in Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act is unconstitutional. They asked for a review of its decisions to reject rescheduling petitions in 2020, 2016 and 1992.

DEA asked the court to dismiss the suit, but that request was rejected in August. It was “denied without prejudice to renewing the arguments in the answering brief,” the judges said.

Now in its answering brief, the agency repeated several arguments attempting to make the case that the court should drop the case. They stated that the petitioners don’t have standing to pursue the suit, they failed to exhaust administrative options and the 2020 petition for rescheduling that’s in question was correctly decided when DEA denied it.

But these are effectively the same claims that the agency made when the court previously denied their request for a dismissal, attorneys representing the petitioners told Marijuana Moment. And that indicates that DEA might not have a strong defense against the lawsuit.

“I’m just going to say we feel really good about our position right now. On the first half of their brief, that’s largely what they wrote before. Some of its verbatim actually, they didn’t change anything,” Matt Zorn, a lawyer representing the Scottsdale Research Institute (SRI), said, adding that the rest are “just different flavors of the same arguments.”

“At base, they’re just complaining that we are appealing the decision.”

Shane Pennington, who is also working on the case, emphasized that DEA submitted arguments in their response that “the court has seen and rejected already, so that feels pretty good.”

Further, they said, the agency largely declined to argue against the merits of the case.

“To us, if you read our briefs, and you look at all the arguments we made, it makes us feel like maybe the reason is because they apparently don’t have a lot to say in response to those merits arguments,” Pennington said.

Petitioners have raised questions about DEA’s reliance on scheduling standards that they feel are arbitrary and misinterpret federal law. In particular, they are seeking reviews of the agency’s claims that marijuana must be strictly scheduled because, the government has claimed, it has no currently accepted medical value and has not been proven to be safe.

They also argue that another statutory policy DEA says necessitates marijuana being strictly controlled is unconstitutional.

In its past denials of rescheduling petitions, the agency has asserted that marijuana can only be placed in either Schedule I or II. But the plaintiffs said in an earlier filing that the statute justifying that determination is “an unconstitutional delegation of legislative authority” that “violates core separation of powers principles” by granting the attorney general authority to schedule drugs on his or her discretion based on an interpretation of international treaty obligations.

This isn’t the first time that SRI has taken the feds to court over their marijuana decisions.

The institute, which is among several dozen applicants to become a federally authorized manufacturer of cannabis for research purposes, successfully forced DEA to issue an update on the status of their application processing and then got the Justice Department to hand over a “secret” memo that DEA allegedly used to justify a delay in deciding on those proposals.

In a separate lawsuit against DEA, medical cannabis patients challenging the federal prohibition of marijuana asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take their case after a series of rulings in lower courts since the original lawsuit was filed in 2017. The high court said in October that it would not be taking up that case, however.

Read DEA’s latest response in the marijuana rescheduling case below:

DEA response in reschedulin… by Marijuana Moment

Photo elements courtesy of rawpixel and Philip Steffan.

https://www.marijuanamoment.net/dea...dismiss-marijuana-rescheduling-lawsuit-again/


Reads like the DEA sees the writing on the wall. They’re dragging their feet but doesn’t look like they’re putting up a fight either.

******NOTICE TO OKIES********
They are now selling Mary’s Muscle Freeze locally. I’ve had special compounded anti -pain lotions created for me by my Dr for about 15 years now. Works better than any otc lotions of course. Then I tried Muscle Freeze. Holy Cow! I knew that saying it has zero medical benefits was an outrageous lie yet, at the same time, saying it’ll cure small pox and Ebola and all between was an outrageous lie too. This is the only topical I’ve tried that helps spinal cord compression and burns. And for hours at a time. Oh, I had a Dr Pepper too.
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,512
4,173
743
#8
DEA Asks Federal Court To Dismiss Marijuana Rescheduling Lawsuit—Again
By Kyle Jaeger December 2, 2020
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is again asking a federal court to reject a case calling for a review of its decision not to reclassify marijuana under federal law.

In a brief filed with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Monday, the federal agency asserted that the suit is invalid because the plaintiffs in the case weren’t the ones to make the ultimately rejected rescheduling request in the first place and, they claimed, the petition lacked merit in any case.

Scientists and veterans sued the federal agency in May, arguing that the legal basis DEA has used to justify keeping cannabis in Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act is unconstitutional. They asked for a review of its decisions to reject rescheduling petitions in 2020, 2016 and 1992.

DEA asked the court to dismiss the suit, but that request was rejected in August. It was “denied without prejudice to renewing the arguments in the answering brief,” the judges said.

Now in its answering brief, the agency repeated several arguments attempting to make the case that the court should drop the case. They stated that the petitioners don’t have standing to pursue the suit, they failed to exhaust administrative options and the 2020 petition for rescheduling that’s in question was correctly decided when DEA denied it.

But these are effectively the same claims that the agency made when the court previously denied their request for a dismissal, attorneys representing the petitioners told Marijuana Moment. And that indicates that DEA might not have a strong defense against the lawsuit.

“I’m just going to say we feel really good about our position right now. On the first half of their brief, that’s largely what they wrote before. Some of its verbatim actually, they didn’t change anything,” Matt Zorn, a lawyer representing the Scottsdale Research Institute (SRI), said, adding that the rest are “just different flavors of the same arguments.”

“At base, they’re just complaining that we are appealing the decision.”

Shane Pennington, who is also working on the case, emphasized that DEA submitted arguments in their response that “the court has seen and rejected already, so that feels pretty good.”

Further, they said, the agency largely declined to argue against the merits of the case.

“To us, if you read our briefs, and you look at all the arguments we made, it makes us feel like maybe the reason is because they apparently don’t have a lot to say in response to those merits arguments,” Pennington said.

Petitioners have raised questions about DEA’s reliance on scheduling standards that they feel are arbitrary and misinterpret federal law. In particular, they are seeking reviews of the agency’s claims that marijuana must be strictly scheduled because, the government has claimed, it has no currently accepted medical value and has not been proven to be safe.

They also argue that another statutory policy DEA says necessitates marijuana being strictly controlled is unconstitutional.

In its past denials of rescheduling petitions, the agency has asserted that marijuana can only be placed in either Schedule I or II. But the plaintiffs said in an earlier filing that the statute justifying that determination is “an unconstitutional delegation of legislative authority” that “violates core separation of powers principles” by granting the attorney general authority to schedule drugs on his or her discretion based on an interpretation of international treaty obligations.

This isn’t the first time that SRI has taken the feds to court over their marijuana decisions.

The institute, which is among several dozen applicants to become a federally authorized manufacturer of cannabis for research purposes, successfully forced DEA to issue an update on the status of their application processing and then got the Justice Department to hand over a “secret” memo that DEA allegedly used to justify a delay in deciding on those proposals.

In a separate lawsuit against DEA, medical cannabis patients challenging the federal prohibition of marijuana asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take their case after a series of rulings in lower courts since the original lawsuit was filed in 2017. The high court said in October that it would not be taking up that case, however.

Read DEA’s latest response in the marijuana rescheduling case below:

DEA response in reschedulin… by Marijuana Moment

Photo elements courtesy of rawpixel and Philip Steffan.

https://www.marijuanamoment.net/dea...dismiss-marijuana-rescheduling-lawsuit-again/


Reads like the DEA sees the writing on the wall. They’re dragging their feet but doesn’t look like they’re putting up a fight either.

******NOTICE TO OKIES********
They are now selling Mary’s Muscle Freeze locally. I’ve had special compounded anti -pain lotions created for me by my Dr for about 15 years now. Works better than any otc lotions of course. Then I tried Muscle Freeze. Holy Cow! I knew that saying it has zero medical benefits was an outrageous lie yet, at the same time, saying it’ll cure small pox and Ebola and all between was an outrageous lie too. This is the only topical I’ve tried that helps spinal cord compression and burns. And for hours at a time. Oh, I had a Dr Pepper too.
So you think the addition of cannabis to a topical pain compound makes the difference in whether it works out not? Seriously interested here.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

llcoolw

Territorial Marshal
Feb 7, 2005
7,043
3,432
1,743
Sammamish, Washington.Dallas, Texas.Maui, Hawaii
#9
So you think the addition of cannabis to a topical pain compound makes the difference in whether it works out not? Seriously interested here.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
Short answer. Biggly. They use a special processor that makes thc extracts. Can be sativa dominant or indica dominant. First one is an up lifting feel and the other is the stereotypical weed high like in the movies. Obviously, mixing the two main strains creates a hybrid. These are what you hear about now with colorful names like Girl Scout Cookie or Pineapple Express. Since there’s an infinite amount of ways to make a hybrid, that’s where you’ll find trade secrets.

This extract is then mixed with the same precursors that OTC ointments, salves and lotions use. Muscle Freeze by Mary’s uses a very high concentrate of menthol mixed with their special hybrid concentration. Since my problem is in the spine itself, topicals just don’t work well. Even specialized topicals are useless. Until I tried this. It also completely dissolved a friends toe corn. He was using it for the pain relief and the cure was just a bonus. It’s not advertised as anything but muscle relief. Mary’s has an entire line of pretty good stuff. Transdermal thc patches. Transdermal gel pens. Tinctures. And there are several other competitors. Like this one.
https://www.simplecureok.com. Also known as green crack. Mainly for cancer patients but I’ve heard good pain relief stories from oil hand workers.