Resume Formatting

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El Gato Bandito

that log had a child
Jan 5, 2009
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#1
There could be all kinds of formatting questions so I thought this might be a good thread to have.

My specific question though. If you have a previous position where you were at a company for 4-5 years and had multiple titles during that, how do you list it?

Should you list each title you had? should you just list the title you had most recently?

example: Hired in 2010 as Event Coordinator, promoted in 2012 as Marketing Manager, promoted again in 2013 to Director of Sales. Left company with that title in 2014.
 

Chris H.

administrator emeritus
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Jul 1, 2004
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chris.hasenpflug.net
#2
If your multiple titles were in-line promotions, I'd just list the last. You could allude to the entry level -> current in the bullet points if you felt it was necessary to show the progression.

If your multiple titles were due to different roles/responsibilities w/in the company, and both are applicable to new job you're applying for, then I'd list two.

A resume does not have to be a complete employment history. That would be a CV. Only list what is relevant.
 

El Gato Bandito

that log had a child
Jan 5, 2009
15,577
16,034
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74075
#3
I've seen multiple suggestions for how to list it. Just wanted to see how others may have done it. In the past personally I've always gone with most recent title.
 
Jan 28, 2011
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Dallas, TX
#8
Yeah, that's bad and old school advice. You've probably missed out on some good hires because of your rigid stance.
And if you're submitting multi-page resumes, you've probably missed out on some good opportunities...

If a resume is actually aimed at each job description that an applicant applies for, it shouldn't be that difficult to keep it to one page.

*Your capstone project from college does not matter 10 years later.
*If you're applying to a similar position, the hiring manager knows what the responsibilities are.
*Just include your RECENT employment history and significant accomplishments. Everything else is unnecessary at this stage of the selection process.
 

POPOKE

Sheriff
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Feb 7, 2007
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#9
And if you're submitting multi-page resumes, you've probably missed out on some good opportunities...

If a resume is actually aimed at each job description that an applicant applies for, it shouldn't be that difficult to keep it to one page.

*Your capstone project from college does not matter 10 years later.
*If you're applying to a similar position, the hiring manager knows what the responsibilities are.
*Just include your RECENT employment history and significant accomplishments. Everything else is unnecessary at this stage of the selection process.
The last job I applied for was the first time my resume had stretched to two pages. It was a complicated position that required a very specific background and work history. I got the job despite my very lengthy resume; I know, I still can't believe it either. I know of plenty other persons who have used multi-page resumes to secure new jobs. Using your logic, Bill Gates himself could submit a two page resume and you wouldn't hire him.

You sound like the type of person who never thinks they're wrong, you like to micro-manage and that you're really old school. Do you also hate backwards hats? Two page resumes are perfectly acceptable these days.
 
Jan 28, 2011
115
72
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Dallas, TX
#10
You sound like the type of person who never thinks they're wrong, you like to micro-manage and that you're really old school. Do you also hate backwards hats? Two page resumes are perfectly acceptable these days.
30 something small business owner, so not very old school. Don't like hats at all, they just don't fit my head right. I doubt Bill Gates even has a resume. His reputation would make it meaningless.

2 page resumes may be ok in some industries or for some positions, but they're not the new standard. I'd say that out of all of the resumes I've reviewed, only 10% were multiple sheets.

The most effective method for getting interviews I've seen is through LinkedIn or face to face networking.

Just my $0.02...
 
Sep 29, 2008
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#11
I would say the length depends on your experiences and the industry. I have been preparing for a promotional opportunity at work and knowing that my greatest weakness is my interview skills, I started applying for jobs in order to land interviews to practice. My first resumes I sent were 2 pages in length and I was lucky enough to land an interview, but was rejected more times than not. After that I changed my resume to include everything and blow them away when they looked at it. My resume now is 4 pages in length and only includes pertinent information within my industry. Since doing so, I have been given an interview for every position I applied for. After each interview I send the representative a thank you and ask for pointers on how I can improve myself. Each and every time, I have been complimented on my resume, told not to change it, and that my resume is what got me the interview. From that they gave pointers on how I can improve my interview skills.

I think the most important thing about the resume is that it looks professional and contains only information pertaining to that job or industry. If that takes you more than one page, then so be it. Make sure it reads easy and each section is clearly marked.

And by the way, thanks to that 4 page impressive resume (as they said) and 2 page cover letter, I start my new job later this month.