Republican Party in an Oklahoma county makes clear its opposition to public education

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StillwaterTownie

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Jun 18, 2010
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#1

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
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Tulsa, OK
#2
The political parties are opposite sides of the same broken record when it comes to this stuff. The Reps insist on no new taxes while not fixing anything and the Dems insist on lots of new taxes while not fixing anything. They will both continue not fixing anything as long as they can keep us distracted by bickering with each other over which is worse. Vote 3rd party.
 
Jul 28, 2011
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#3
There is only one answer...beg Texas to annex Oklahoma. Texans have obviously figured out this governing thing and Okies have not. Annexation would put an end to the Texas Envy that occupies the hearts of most Okies and becoming North Texas would provide all the benefits Texans enjoy and Sooners can only dream about. Apparently, as long as Okies govern Oklahoma, there isn't much hope.
 
Jul 20, 2018
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#4
It's not that difficult. Change how you fund your school districts. Quit sucking on the teat of big oil. Pay some taxes-preferably consumption taxes.
 

StillwaterTownie

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#7
There is only one answer...beg Texas to annex Oklahoma. Texans have obviously figured out this governing thing and Okies have not. Annexation would put an end to the Texas Envy that occupies the hearts of most Okies and becoming North Texas would provide all the benefits Texans enjoy and Sooners can only dream about. Apparently, as long as Okies govern Oklahoma, there isn't much hope.
But property taxes are higher in Texas. I don't see how Republicans there put up with it.
 
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#9
If by consumption taxes you mean putting sales tax on most every service, that idea was totally rejected and not even given a committee hearing at the state capitol.
I'm opposed to taxing services. I'm for taxing goods other than the basic necessities of life such as uncooked food, drugs, etc.
 

Rack

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Oct 13, 2004
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#12
They are only high in certain parts of Texas. I pay $14000 per year but my aunt and uncle on the north side of Houston only pay $1900 per year.
$14,000? a year? Man your property must be NICE....I think I paid about $4,000 a year when we lived in Dallas 20 years ago....and that was on a 1,600sf home worth about 180K back then (late 90's)...btw, it's now worth over $500K...crazy housing inflation in Texas cities is driving buyers crazy for the past 2 or 3 years now.

I for one, KNOW, how much cheaper it is to live in Oklahoma for the middle class, both Tax and otherwise...despite the no state income tax thing in Texas...they get you elsewhere.
 
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#13
$14,000? a year? Man your property must be NICE....I think I paid about $4,000 a year when we lived in Dallas 20 years ago....and that was on a 1,600sf home worth about 180K back then (late 90's)...btw, it's now worth over $500K...crazy housing inflation in Texas cities is driving buyers crazy.

I for one, KNOW, how much cheaper it is to live in Oklahoma for the middle class, both Tax and otherwise...despite the no state income tax thing in Texas...they get you elsewhere.
It's not as nice as you would think. We wanted to live in an area that had good schools and would sell quickly when we got ready to move. 3200 ft2. worth about $360.

Besides schools, another reason we pay high property taxes in Texas is because, in new subdivisions, you also pay a tax for the infrastructure of the subdivision. For example, we pay about $6000 per year to pay off a bond that was used to build the streets, sewers, water lines, lights, etc. We also have to pay to maintain that infrastructure so once you get the bond paid off, the cost rises for maintenance as it gets older.
 

Rack

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#14
It's not as nice as you would think. We wanted to live in an area that had good schools and would sell quickly when we got ready to move. 3200 ft2. worth about $360.

Besides schools, another reason we pay high property taxes in Texas is because, in new subdivisions, you also pay a tax for the infrastructure of the subdivision. For example, we pay about $6000 per year to pay off a bond that was used to build the streets, sewers, water lines, lights, etc. We also have to pay to maintain that infrastructure so once you get the bond paid off, the cost rises for maintenance as it gets older.
ugh...I'll take my low taxes on real estate here in Tulsa... I had no idea on the infrastructure for the subdivision crap...wow. I think the whole argument by teachers that want to increase their wages here based on pay in Texas, has a point, but is shortsighted in terms of the lifestyle expenses of actually living in the major Metro areas of Texas (being much higher in my experience). While I would definitely say our teachers are underpaid, the argument for equal to Texas teachers wages isn't a good one. Apples to Oranges really.
 
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#16
So...I am genuinely curious about this question: in your opinions, why is Texas so prosperous, so desirable, so fast growing, so far advanced in so many ways as compared to Oklahoma? Texas has grown to the point where they have at least three markets (DFW, Houston and San Antonio/Austin) with more people than the entire state of OK. Other than the sheer size of the state, what is going on in Texas that isn't going on in OK?
 
Jul 20, 2018
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#17
So...I am genuinely curious about this question: in your opinions, why is Texas so prosperous, so desirable, so fast growing, so far advanced in so many ways as compared to Oklahoma? Texas has grown to the point where they have at least three markets (DFW, Houston and San Antonio/Austin) with more people than the entire state of OK. Other than the sheer size of the state, what is going on in Texas that isn't going on in OK?
Basically, the state of Texas has a lot of assets due primarily to location and size. It's highly diverse in multiple ways-people, land, etc. We have a business friendly regulatory environment with no state income taxes.

Permian Basin, Eagle Ford, East Texas Oil Field, Gulf of Mexico, Houston Ship Channel, High Tech industry in Austin, Corporate Headquarters in Las Colinas, Houston Medical Center, NASA, Houston Energy Corridor, Several major shipping terminals, huge farms and ranches.

I like Oklahoma and don't want it to become like Texas. It's ok that the two states are different.
 

StillwaterTownie

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#18
Texas, having been a state since 1845, has had more time to grow as a state than Oklahoma. Also like Florida most of Texas is warmer in the winter than Oklahoma. On the other hand, Kansas was admitted in 1861 and can wonder why Oklahoma has outgrown it in population. Same with Iowa and other states. Oil for Oklahoma has been better for growth than ag.
 
Jul 28, 2011
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#19
Basically, the state of Texas has a lot of assets due primarily to location and size. It's highly diverse in multiple ways-people, land, etc. We have a business friendly regulatory environment with no state income taxes.

Permian Basin, Eagle Ford, East Texas Oil Field, Gulf of Mexico, Houston Ship Channel, High Tech industry in Austin, Corporate Headquarters in Las Colinas, Houston Medical Center, NASA, Houston Energy Corridor, Several major shipping terminals, huge farms and ranches.

I like Oklahoma and don't want it to become like Texas. It's ok that the two states are different.[/QU
Nice response OKST1...and so civil.
 

SLVRBK

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#20
It's not as nice as you would think. We wanted to live in an area that had good schools and would sell quickly when we got ready to move. 3200 ft2. worth about $360.

Besides schools, another reason we pay high property taxes in Texas is because, in new subdivisions, you also pay a tax for the infrastructure of the subdivision. For example, we pay about $6000 per year to pay off a bond that was used to build the streets, sewers, water lines, lights, etc. We also have to pay to maintain that infrastructure so once you get the bond paid off, the cost rises for maintenance as it gets older.
Are you in DFW area?