Question regarding the public reactions to racism

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,229
4,311
743
The video below shows the beliefs of those on the ground. They openly spout this and no one calls them on it. So if the majority don't want this then why don't they call them out?

https://share.par.pw/post/342d620fe4b0449f8c7dbde0ac5ff8c2

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
It wants me to download an app to view the post/video. Is there any way to link to the video directly instead?

I have seen a lot of people calling out violence and vandalism, again, I would be careful of trying to paint everyone or anything more than a small minority as violent.

Let's turn the tables. Why don't you call out the white supremacist Trump supporters? If the majority of Trump supporters don't share those values, why don't we see more people calling them out?

Do you see what I am talking about?
The link should offer you the option of opening it in your browser instead.

Pretty much all conservatives I know call out the small minority of supremacists. You are gonna tell me that all those liberal kids, similar to the ones that started Chaz, aren't socialist/Marxist when they say they are?
Do you call out Antifa for their violence, or are you one of those people that says they are just a few loose groups with no organization, even though it's now been proven that they are large enough they reach into other countries and there is a leadership at the top calling out orders?

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,229
4,311
743
The video below shows the beliefs of those on the ground. They openly spout this and no one calls them on it. So if the majority don't want this then why don't they call them out?

https://share.par.pw/post/342d620fe4b0449f8c7dbde0ac5ff8c2

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
It wants me to download an app to view the post/video. Is there any way to link to the video directly instead?

I have seen a lot of people calling out violence and vandalism, again, I would be careful of trying to paint everyone or anything more than a small minority as violent.

Let's turn the tables. Why don't you call out the white supremacist Trump supporters? If the majority of Trump supporters don't share those values, why don't we see more people calling them out?

Do you see what I am talking about?
I'll see if I can find the video on a different social media platform other than parlor considering that's where it's at. But it shouldn't matter it should allow you to see it even if you don't have the app.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

okstate987

Territorial Marshal
A/V Subscriber
Oct 17, 2009
7,642
5,009
1,743
Somewhere
The link should offer you the option of opening it in your browser instead.

Pretty much all conservatives I know call out the small minority of supremacists. You are gonna tell me that all those liberal kids, similar to the ones that started Chaz, aren't socialist/Marxist when they say they are?
Do you call out Antifa for their violence, or are you one of those people that says they are just a few loose groups with no organization, even though it's now been proven that they are large enough they reach into other countries and there is a leadership at the top calling out orders?

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
I think antifa is fascist in their antifacism, and are also a very small group, just like neo nazis. There is also a bunch of people that call themselves antifa and all they do is post memes on the internet, similar to most of the boogaloo people.

Most conservatives I know will try to discredit the fact that virtually all white supremacists support Trump instead of denounce the white supremacists in the first place. If they did, I think a lot of conversations would go pretty different.
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,229
4,311
743
A woman, who was protesting while blocking an interstate in Seattle at 2AM, was struck and killed by a car two nights ago. CNN and other media sites picked up the story. There is ample video of the woman getting flung threw the air.

Now, the story is nowhere on CNN or MSNBC’s website. Oddly, CNN currently has a front page story about a highway protesting blocking a Philadelphia highway, but now mums the word about the Seattle incident. Why has the story about the Seattle woman’s death suddenly been dropped?

Unfortunately, we all know the reason why. Anything that doesn’t fit the narrative and may upset their readers worldview is quickly hidden.
Oh they were sure quick though to label it as a murderous Trump supporter.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

okstate987

Territorial Marshal
A/V Subscriber
Oct 17, 2009
7,642
5,009
1,743
Somewhere
I'll see if I can find the video on a different social media platform other than parlor considering that's where it's at. But it shouldn't matter it should allow you to see it even if you don't have the app.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
1594001062522.png

This is what I am getting. I don't do social media outside of reddit, so I don't want to create an account.
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,229
4,311
743
The link should offer you the option of opening it in your browser instead.

Pretty much all conservatives I know call out the small minority of supremacists. You are gonna tell me that all those liberal kids, similar to the ones that started Chaz, aren't socialist/Marxist when they say they are?
Do you call out Antifa for their violence, or are you one of those people that says they are just a few loose groups with no organization, even though it's now been proven that they are large enough they reach into other countries and there is a leadership at the top calling out orders?

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
I think antifa is fascist in their antifacism, and are also a very small group, just like neo nazis.
They have organizations in every major city in the u.s. there are multiple groups of them in the u.k, France, Italy, etc... They are NOT in anyway small.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,229
4,311
743
I'll see if I can find the video on a different social media platform other than parlor considering that's where it's at. But it shouldn't matter it should allow you to see it even if you don't have the app.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
View attachment 82879
This is what I am getting. I don't do social media outside of reddit, so I don't want to create an account.
https://twitter.com/antifa_public/status/1279852765452345344?s=20


Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

okstate987

Territorial Marshal
A/V Subscriber
Oct 17, 2009
7,642
5,009
1,743
Somewhere
They have organizations in every major city in the u.s. there are multiple groups of them in the u.k, France, Italy, etc... They are NOT in anyway small.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
https://twitter.com/antifa_public/status/1279852765452345344?s=20



Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
No, it is not, and that twitter account does not look like a viable source. Its mostly a Trump deflection.
https://reason.com/2020/06/01/trump-antifa-domestic-terrorist-group-violence-protests/

President Donald Trump announced Sunday that he would designate the leftist "antifa" movement a domestic terrorist organization, following several days of peaceful protesting but also rioting and looting in the wake of George Floyd's killing.
Activists informally associated with antifa—which is short for "antifascist"—were responsible for some of the violence over the weekend. They have also committed crimes during previous protests: Trump's inauguration in D.C., the Portland demonstrations against the Proud Boys, and many others. This is consistent with antifa's ideology, which holds (generally speaking) that harsh tactics are necessary to combat the far right and does not believe in extending free speech to people who oppose its goals. (My book Panic Attack: Young Radicals in the Age of Trump includes an in-depth look at antifa's history, tactics, and goals.)
So antifa is well worth criticizing. But Trump's declaration is flawed in a number of ways.
For one thing, it's not actually possible for the president to label antifa a domestic terrorist group: There is no such designation. The U.S. State Department maintains a list of known terrorist organizations, but it includes only foreign groups—mostly radical Islamists.
Antifa is obnoxious, and it has been responsible for a fair amount of violence, but it's obviously not a threat to U.S. security on the same level as al-Qaeda or ISIS. It doesn't even have a leader, central organization, or formal membership.
For another thing, giving the government greater license to consider all antifa activities terroristic in nature would certainly result in civil liberties violations. The authorities would end up harassing and surveilling Americans who have professed sympathy for the far left but are not engaged in anything approaching criminal activity.
Attorney General Bill Barr said on Sunday that the Justice Department would investigate the "criminal organizers and instigators" who are responsible for this weekend's mayhem. The government already has all the authority it needs to go after people who committed violence, whether or not they consider themselves part of antifa. A domestic terrorist designation is a meaningless gesture: It gives a bunch of social irritants more legitimacy than they deserve.
 

okstate987

Territorial Marshal
A/V Subscriber
Oct 17, 2009
7,642
5,009
1,743
Somewhere
The demand for antifa is greater than the supply.

After Barr Ordered FBI to “Identify Criminal Organizers,” Activists Were Intimidated at Home and at Work

Chris Brooks

June 12 2020, 4:00 a.m.

“I’ve never had any run-ins with the cops before. I’ve never been to jail and have no criminal record, so when the FBI showed up to my workplace, it scared the piss out of me,” says Katy, a 22-year-old who works for a custodial services company in Cookeville, a small college town in middle Tennessee. “I really thought I was going to lose my job. The whole experience was terrifying.”
Moved by the video of the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Katy — who requested she only be identified by her first name — and a friend had created a Facebook event for a Black Lives Matter rally in Cookeville’s public square on Saturday, June 6. She soon connected with several other Cookeville locals who wanted to help with planning the event, and enthusiasm grew as word of the rally spread.
“I’ve never organized a rally before, I was just winging it,” Katy said. “I didn’t expect a lot of people to show up, but overnight 600 people had RSVP’d on Facebook.”
Join Our Newsletter
Original reporting. Fearless journalism. Delivered to you.

I’m in

Counter-protesters organized their own Facebook group, Protect Cookeville Against Looters, which quickly swelled to over 1,000 members. Some of the members of this group determined that Katy was the main organizer of the upcoming rally and began posting her personal information and making violent threats.
“The event for the rally had been up for about four days when we started getting death threats,” Katy said. “It was too much. I was overwhelmed.”
Katy eventually backed out of the rally — and a group of local high school students took over planning — but she had already gotten the attention of the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force, or JTTF, a federally coordinated network of local law enforcement officers who work under the direction of the FBI to gather intelligence about terrorist threats.
On June 4, agents turned up unannounced at Katy’s work, pulling her off the job and into a large truck in the gravel parking lot to question her about her connections to the upcoming rally and to antifa — the loose anti-fascist movement recently labeled as a terrorist organization by President Donald Trump. Katy had never heard of them.
As The Intercept has previously reported, FBI agents have been questioning arrested protesters about their political beliefs, apparently at the behest of U.S. Attorney General William Barr. Barr, following Trump’s repeated false assertions that there is a sophisticated, national network of antifa operatives infiltrating local protests against police brutality to enflame violence, announced that antifa is a domestic terrorist organization on May 31.
Barr also directed the JTTF to “identify criminal organizers and instigators,” even though antifa has no organizational structure and the FBI’sown internal assessments don’t support the claim that antifa is somehow weaponizing protests
The following week, over the span of four days, Katy and at least three other activists in Cookeville, whose population is just 34,000, received unannounced visits by agents who questioned them about their political affiliations and whether they had information about outside agitators planning to hijack local protests.
“What the JTTF is doing is shocking, but we saw this happen before during the McCarthy era, when the FBI and other various agencies investigated activists with the purpose of discouraging or chilling free speech,” said Will York, an attorney who specializes in free speech cases and is a founding member of the National Lawyers Guild’s Nashville chapter. “If the movement for police reform and racial justice has legs in Cookeville, Tennessee, then it clearly has touched a deep nerve in this country. Federal and local police agencies trying to counter that momentum are likely to use these tactics to make activists think twice about organizing such an event again, especially in rural communities.”
Eli Anderson, a 19-year-old college student on summer break back home in Cookeville, decided to organize an impromptu Black Lives Matter rally in the Cookeville public square on Tuesday, June 2. A little after 3 p.m., Anderson and his friends announced on their Instagram stories that there would be a peaceful protest in the city square at 5 p.m. A friend picked Anderson up at 4:30 p.m. to head to the rally when he got a call from his mother saying, “The FBI is here and I don’t know what is happening.”
Anderson rushed home. By the time he got there, the two agents were gone and his mother was in a state of panic. She told Eli they had flashed FBI credentials.
“The agents told her they had been monitoring my social media and believed that I might have information about antifa coming to town,” Anderson said. “I’m like, ‘What the fuck is antifa?’ I had never even heard of it before.”
“I’m like, ‘What the fuck is antifa?’ I had never even heard of it before.”​
The next night, on the evening of Wednesday, June 3, Mackenzie Randall, a 21-year-old electrical engineering major at Tennessee Tech University, was startled when two JTTF agents showed up to her apartment unannounced.
The agents told Randall they wanted to talk her about her social media posts offering to help provide transportation to the local Black Lives Matter protest set for that Saturday. Randall let the agents into her home, where they began questioning her about, in her words, “terrorist organizations trying to come into the peaceful protests in Cookeville.”
“He asked me if I knew anyone in antifa or had heard anything about antifa coming to Cookeville,” Randall said. The agents also mentioned private posts Randall had made on her own Facebook page, which could only be seen by her Facebook friends.
“They were very intimidating,” she said. The FBI did not respond to request for comment. One of the JTTF officers who interviewed Katy, Randall, and Smith is a deputy for the Putnam County Sheriff’s Office. The sheriff’s office declined to comment for this story.
“If the movement for police reform and racial justice has legs in Cookeville, Tennessee then it clearly has touched a deep nerve in this country.”​
Katy recalled a similar experience. “They were trying to make me feel like dangerous people were going to come to Cookeville and just burn shit to the ground and give us a bad name,” Katy said. “I feel like it was pure intimidation. They didn’t want us to have that rally.’
The next day, agents also showed up unannounced to the home of Andrew Smith, a gregarious 52-year-old Presbyterian minister and instructor at Tennessee Tech. Smith’s wife recorded the short exchange. Smith did most of the talking, preaching to the agents about the social justice ministry of Jesus Christ.
“I think they realized they knocked on the wrong door and weren’t going to intimidate me,” Smith said. “They couldn’t get out of there any quicker.”
The JTTF had grown in Tennessee since September 11, 2001. “Lots of agencies love the JTTF because they can keep a deputy or an agent and not have to pay their salary because the FBI pays for it,” Mark Miller, a former Tennessee state trooper and Cookeville City Council member, told The Intercept.
“There is a whole team of JTTF cyber security agents in Nashville who just monitor people’s Facebooks,” Miller said. “I know this from being a law enforcement officer, we’ve had plenty of classes on it.”
Despite the fear stoked by JTTF officers, large crowds still turned out to the rally in Cookeville last Saturday. Protesters held signs that said “Love Thy Neighbor As Thy Self” and “End Police Brutality,” and listened as their neighbors shared stories over a megaphone. It was a sunny day. There were no arrests.

https://theintercept.com/2020/06/12/fbi-jttf-protests-activists-cookeville-tennessee/
 

Jostate

Bluecolla's sock
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
20,573
14,655
1,743
"Systemic racism" in the business world would imply things like emails and memos would occasionally leak out. Something tells me those are pretty hard to find.

As far as the systemic racism from law enforcement, there is a political party and complicit media that has much to gain by furthering that narrative. We can debate if it's true, or to what extent, but just know it's not going away anytime soon. Out of a country of 333,000,000 people, 800,000 police and over 50 million interactions between the 2 groups each year there will always be opportunities to show how racist the cops are.

I'm saying don't expect this to go away soon. 4 years ago it was more about immigration, that was replaced by #me too. The systemic racism debate will lose interest in the media at times then flair up again, but it will be here for decades.
 

steross

Bookface/Instagran legend
A/V Subscriber
Mar 31, 2004
29,364
33,576
1,743
oklahoma city
"Systemic racism" in the business world would imply things like emails and memos would occasionally leak out. Something tells me those are pretty hard to find.
Of course those are hard to find. Why would they need to exist at all??

Doctors order less pain medication and do no treat blood pressure as well in minority patients. That has been studied in multiple settings. But, no doctor writes, "I'm not going to give this guy as much pain medicine because he is black." A supply manager who chooses one supplier of widgets over another when both companies had equal products because he just "got a better feel" from the sales rep for one company more than the other could be systemic racism. Nobody is ever gonna write an email, "I chose company A because the rep was another white guy." The person making the choice probably isn't even aware he did it.

You seem fixated on the word "racism" meaning a white supremacist who actively wants to keep black people down. When it is used in this context, it isn't that. It is merely the differential in treatment of someone based on their skin color. Maybe a different word than "racism" to note this would be better since some people have issue with it.
 

Jostate

Bluecolla's sock
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
20,573
14,655
1,743
Of course those are hard to find. Why would they need to exist at all??

Doctors order less pain medication and do no treat blood pressure as well in minority patients. That has been studied in multiple settings. But, no doctor writes, "I'm not going to give this guy as much pain medicine because he is black." A supply manager who chooses one supplier of widgets over another when both companies had equal products because he just "got a better feel" from the sales rep for one company more than the other could be systemic racism. Nobody is ever gonna write an email, "I chose company A because the rep was another white guy." The person making the choice probably isn't even aware he did it.

You seem fixated on the word "racism" meaning a white supremacist who actively wants to keep black people down. When it is used in this context, it isn't that. It is merely the differential in treatment of someone based on their skin color. Maybe a different word than "racism" to note this would be better since some people have issue with it.
That subtle, possibly unintentional, racism you speak of is hard to address and a little different than the cops beating up a black guys for not using his blinker stories.

I don't know how you fix that because it's inside a person's heart and not something the government can easily address. That's when you get into regulating a thought process based on those studies. This results in telling a Dr. what to prescribe because a study showed us the Dr. must be biased in his decision process, or telling a hiring manager who he should hire because the numbers say someone out there might not be fair.

Do you want the government involved in your handling of patients because some other Dr. may have been unfair? I don't want the government involved in my staffing decisions because it's hard enough to find and retain good employees without thinking of quotas.

I'm not trying to be argumentative, but how do you address that level of racism?
 
Last edited:

OSUCowboy787

Territorial Marshal
Dec 31, 2008
7,051
6,038
1,743
33
Keller, Texas
"Systemic racism" in the business world would imply things like emails and memos would occasionally leak out. Something tells me those are pretty hard to find.

As far as the systemic racism from law enforcement, there is a political party and complicit media that has much to gain by furthering that narrative. We can debate if it's true, or to what extent, but just know it's not going away anytime soon. Out of a country of 333,000,000 people, 800,000 police and over 50 million interactions between the 2 groups each year there will always be opportunities to show how racist the cops are.

I'm saying don't expect this to go away soon. 4 years ago it was more about immigration, that was replaced by #me too. The systemic racism debate will lose interest in the media at times then flair up again, but it will be here for decades.
The only overtly sexist/racist thing I have seen in business is when I was forced to go to OSU's career day when I worked for a large oil and gas company in Tulsa. We were told to only look for minority or female candidates. If we found a great white male candidate, too bad. We had a 'good' and 'bad' stack of resumes for internships and new hires and only minorities and females were allowed in the 'good' stack.
 

Jostate

Bluecolla's sock
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
20,573
14,655
1,743
The only overtly sexist/racist thing I have seen in business is when I was forced to go to OSU's career day when I worked for a large oil and gas company in Tulsa. We were told to only look for minority or female candidates. If we found a great white male candidate, too bad. We had a 'good' and 'bad' stack of resumes for internships and new hires and only minorities and females were allowed in the 'good' stack.
Anyone involved in staffing decisions is probably aware of a situation where the deck was tilted in an effort to avoid the appearance of racism at some time. Yes I've seen it too. These days everyone is playing the victim so the last thing we need is for the old white guys to join in. I try not go down that path and just control what I can control.
 

oks10

Territorial Marshal
A/V Subscriber
Sep 9, 2007
9,034
7,188
1,743
Piedmont, OK
https://www.facebook.com/569022853258776/posts/1553331441494574/?vh=e&d=n
Was that guy carrying TWO rifles??… :confused: I mean, at least he has the awareness to keep his barrel pointing away from people.

Also, I got a kick out of this:
[Black Guy] "Where's our reparations?"
[White Guy] "What did I do to you?"
[Black Guy] "It's not what you did, it's what your ancestors did."

I'm having trouble following the logic there (I know there is none). So, he thinks that not because of anything WE have actually done but instead because what our long and dead ancestors did (since, you know, all us whiteys have slave owners in our genealogy…) that HE deserves a financial kickback??
 

Jostate

Bluecolla's sock
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
20,573
14,655
1,743
Was that guy carrying TWO rifles??… :confused: I mean, at least he has the awareness to keep his barrel pointing away from people.

Also, I got a kick out of this:
[Black Guy] "Where's our reparations?"
[White Guy] "What did I do to you?"
[Black Guy] "It's not what you did, it's what your ancestors did."

I'm having trouble following the logic there (I know there is none). So, he thinks that not because of anything WE have actually done but instead because what our long and dead ancestors did (since, you know, all us whiteys have slave owners in our genealogy…) that HE deserves a financial kickback??
Reparations is a stupid idea politicians use to get votes but they know it is impractical for a number of reasons. I'm guessing he'd like his 40 acres, but you can keep the mule.
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,229
4,311
743
"Systemic racism" in the business world would imply things like emails and memos would occasionally leak out. Something tells me those are pretty hard to find.
Of course those are hard to find. Why would they need to exist at all??

Doctors order less pain medication and do no treat blood pressure as well in minority patients. That has been studied in multiple settings. But, no doctor writes, "I'm not going to give this guy as much pain medicine because he is black." A supply manager who chooses one supplier of widgets over another when both companies had equal products because he just "got a better feel" from the sales rep for one company more than the other could be systemic racism. Nobody is ever gonna write an email, "I chose company A because the rep was another white guy." The person making the choice probably isn't even aware he did it.

You seem fixated on the word "racism" meaning a white supremacist who actively wants to keep black people down. When it is used in this context, it isn't that. It is merely the differential in treatment of someone based on their skin color. Maybe a different word than "racism" to note this would be better since some people have issue with it.
They have issue with it because it means one thing, and from what you are saying, it is trying to be changed to fit a different meaning based on someone's beliefs.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,229
4,311
743
https://www.facebook.com/569022853258776/posts/1553331441494574/?vh=e&d=n


Was that guy carrying TWO rifles??… :confused: I mean, at least he has the awareness to keep his barrel pointing away from people.

Also, I got a kick out of this:
[Black Guy] "Where's our reparations?"
[White Guy] "What did I do to you?"
[Black Guy] "It's not what you did, it's what your ancestors did."

I'm having trouble following the logic there (I know there is none). So, he thinks that not because of anything WE have actually done but instead because what our long and dead ancestors did (since, you know, all us whiteys have slave owners in our genealogy…) that HE deserves a financial kickback??
But see, my ancestors are mostly Mennonite that came here after slavery due to religious persecution in Russia, oh and some Irish and a very little Apache. On the Irish side, here in early 1900's. And lived in small town Oklahoma. So my ancestors did nothing to him or any other black person.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:

Jostate

Bluecolla's sock
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
20,573
14,655
1,743
They have issue with it because it means one thing, and from what you are saying, it is trying to be changed to fit a different meaning based on someone's beliefs.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
It's the systemic part that I get hung up on. Racism exists. Probably to a lesser extent than we are told by some politicians and media, but it exists. The word "systemic" implies companies allow it to take place or encourage it. I challenge you to find any company of any size who encourages racism or even looks the other way. Actually all companies of any size actively work against it. Search any company you can think of, go to their website, and click "careers" or "jobs", you will quickly find an abundance of testimony about their efforts towards diversity.