Proud to be an American

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CaliforniaCowboy

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Oct 15, 2003
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I want to hear how he equates religion to individualism.
Please don't try to make it about me. You can actually google the issue if you're really as interested as you say. There are quite a number of published works on the subject.

for example...

(from Catholic teachings)
(Individualism) Considered historically and in relation to the amount of attention that it receives, the most important form of individualism is that which is called political. It varies in degree from pure anarchism to the theory that the State's only proper functions are to maintain order and enforce contracts. In ancient Greece and Rome, political theory and practice were anti-individualistic; for they considered and made the State the supreme good, an end in itself, to which the individual was a mere means.

Directly opposed to this conception was the Christian teaching that the individual soul had an independent and indestructible value, and that the State was only a means, albeit a necessary means, to individual welfare. Throughout the Middle Ages, therefore, the ancient theory was everywhere rejected. Nevertheless the prevailing theory and practice were far removed from anything that could be called individualism.


or..... from online United States History
Protestantism shaped the views of the vast majority of Americans in the antebellum years. The influence of religion only intensified during the decades before the Civil War, as religious camp meetings spread the word that people could bring about their own salvation, a direct contradiction to the Calvinist doctrine of predestination. Alongside this religious fervor, transcendentalists advocated a more direct knowledge of the self and an emphasis on individualism. The writers and thinkers devoted to transcendentalism, as well as the reactions against it, created a trove of writings, an outpouring that has been termed the American Renaissance.

THE SECOND GREAT AWAKENING
An engraving depicts a Methodist camp meeting. Listeners sit, stand, and recline in a large outdoor area; trees and tents are visible in the background. On a central stage, a preacher enthusiastically addresses the crowd, with an arm raised.

The reform efforts of the antebellum era sprang from the Protestant revival fervor that found expression in what historians refer to as the Second Great Awakening. (The First Great Awakening of evangelical Protestantism had taken place in the 1730s and 1740s.) The Second Great Awakening emphasized an emotional religious style in which sinners grappled with their unworthy nature before concluding that they were born again, that is, turning away from their sinful past and devoting themselves to living a righteous, Christ-centered life. This emphasis on personal salvation, with its rejection of predestination (the Calvinist concept that God selected only a chosen few for salvation), was the religious embodiment of the Jacksonian celebration of the individual. Itinerant ministers preached the message of the awakening to hundreds of listeners at outdoors revival meetings.
https://courses.lumenlearning.com/ushistory1os/chapter/an-awakening-of-religion-and-individualism/
 

CaliforniaCowboy

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Oct 15, 2003
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You truly and honestly think an overwhelmingly liberal country like Norway, Sweden or Iceland like Los Angeles is on par with North Korea?

I HAVE got to hear this response?
I did not say anything like that, and I don't really understand your question. I'd like to hear that response too if you know of anybody who said that.

are you asking are there "degrees" of socialism and communist dictators? Ans: Well yes of course.

Are you insinuating that I said Norway, Sweden or Iceland or Los Angeles are socialist countries... no I did not say that.

I have no idea what your statement is even supposed to mean.
 

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
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“There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all.”
“This is just as true of the man who puts “native” before the hyphen as of the man who puts German or Irish or English or French before the hyphen. Americanism is a matter of the spirit and of the soul. Our allegiance must be purely to the United States. We must unsparingly condemn any man who holds any other allegiance.”
“But if he is heartily and singly loyal to this Republic, then no matter where he was born, he is just as good an American as any one else.”
“The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English- Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian- Americans, or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality than with the other citizens of the American Republic.”
“The men who do not become Americans and nothing else are hyphenated Americans; and there ought to be no room for them in this country. The man who calls himself an American citizen and who yet shows by his actions that he is primarily the citizen of a foreign land, plays a thoroughly mischievous part in the life of our body politic. He has no place here; and the sooner he returns to the land to which he feels his real heart-allegiance, the better it will be for every good American.”
Theodore Roosevelt
Address to the Knights of Columbus
New York City- October 12th, 1915
 

CaliforniaCowboy

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“There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all.”
“This is just as true of the man who puts “native” before the hyphen as of the man who puts German or Irish or English or French before the hyphen. Americanism is a matter of the spirit and of the soul. Our allegiance must be purely to the United States. We must unsparingly condemn any man who holds any other allegiance.”
“But if he is heartily and singly loyal to this Republic, then no matter where he was born, he is just as good an American as any one else.”
“The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English- Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian- Americans, or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality than with the other citizens of the American Republic.”
“The men who do not become Americans and nothing else are hyphenated Americans; and there ought to be no room for them in this country. The man who calls himself an American citizen and who yet shows by his actions that he is primarily the citizen of a foreign land, plays a thoroughly mischievous part in the life of our body politic. He has no place here; and the sooner he returns to the land to which he feels his real heart-allegiance, the better it will be for every good American.”
Theodore Roosevelt
Address to the Knights of Columbus
New York City- October 12th, 1915
Teddy wasn't an idiot - but he did not explain what "being loyal to the Republic" actually means.... e.g. Sanders, Pelosi, et. al. are NOT "loyal to the Republic" and therefore are not "American".

If they are working towards the downfall of the Republic, then they cannot be "American", they are simply "from America".
 
Nov 30, 2010
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I'm wondering what a statement like that even means. I know I'm grateful to be an American, but I'm not sure I'm proud or ashamed to be one. To me pride is more about specific actions/accomplishments than it is about identity. Maybe someone can explain it to me in a way that it resonates, but like I said earlier, I am grateful and feel extremely fortunate to have been born a US citizen because I know so many around the world would trade places with me in a minute, but that doesn't really make me feel proud. I guess to put it another way, I'm proud to have graduated from OSU, but not really proud or ashamed to be an Okie.
Exactly Teachum. Proud of what exactly?
 
Nov 30, 2010
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“There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all.”
“This is just as true of the man who puts “native” before the hyphen as of the man who puts German or Irish or English or French before the hyphen. Americanism is a matter of the spirit and of the soul. Our allegiance must be purely to the United States. We must unsparingly condemn any man who holds any other allegiance.”
“But if he is heartily and singly loyal to this Republic, then no matter where he was born, he is just as good an American as any one else.”
“The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English- Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian- Americans, or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality than with the other citizens of the American Republic.”
“The men who do not become Americans and nothing else are hyphenated Americans; and there ought to be no room for them in this country. The man who calls himself an American citizen and who yet shows by his actions that he is primarily the citizen of a foreign land, plays a thoroughly mischievous part in the life of our body politic. He has no place here; and the sooner he returns to the land to which he feels his real heart-allegiance, the better it will be for every good American.”
Theodore Roosevelt
Address to the Knights of Columbus
New York City- October 12th, 1915
Just to be clear, everyone with the exception of the indigenous race is a hyphenated something. That was the whole point to creating the USA.
 

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
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Just to be clear, everyone with the exception of the indigenous race is a hyphenated something. That was the whole point to creating the USA.
Thanks for clearing that up, no US Americans before there was a US of America, got it.

Just to be clear, the issue isn’t hyphenated Americans, the issue is where your allegiance lies.
1DC13DA5-9921-4AE3-AD7A-3BEC5D79B409.jpeg
 
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Nov 30, 2010
1,275
314
713
Tulsa, OK
Thanks for clearing that up, no US Americans before there was a US of America, got it.

Just to be clear, the issue isn’t hyphenated Americans, the issue is where your allegiance lies. View attachment 72050
Based on your perception, because to some it dame sure sounds like all of a sudden it's un-American to hyphenate when the Irish, Italians, and everyone else has been doing it for centuries. I don't think anyone was claiming WASPs were un-American.
 

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
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Based on your perception, because to some it dame sure sounds like all of a sudden it's un-American to hyphenate when the Irish, Italians, and everyone else has been doing it for centuries. I don't think anyone was claiming WASPs were un-American.
I didn’t write it, I wholly agree with the sentiment. Based on your reply one of three things is a certainty
1 You didn’t read what Roosevelt said
2 You read it and didn’t understand what he said
3 either way based on your ‘analysis’ of what was said, you probably need to change your screen name because analyst don’t fit
 
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RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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Thanks for clearing that up, no US Americans before there was a US of America, got it.

Just to be clear, the issue isn’t hyphenated Americans, the issue is where your allegiance lies. View attachment 72050
Progressives, trying to tell people how to live their lives for more than a century and still can't make up their damn minds on how to do it.