Oklahoma State OL - Film

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Darth Ryno

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#1
I couldn't sleep tonight... so I went back to watch the OSU/Tech game. I did the same thing with this game as I did for the Iowa State game... cutting film focusing on the OL play. I'll probably cut the Kansas game to just be fair (maybe this week if I get the chance).

While the OL was better, I really don't feel that getting Arlington Hambright (#51 LT) back will make any real difference. This game, as a whole, showed me a few things... first, our OL is really mediocre at best. Second, Cornelius showed me that he's really not that good. Not as good as Gundy claims him to be. Yes, running for his life vs Iowa State will make Aaron Rogers look bad but there were many times he had 3-4 seconds in the pocket to make plays and didn't. Certainly wasn't because the TT defensive backs were Alabama-like. Third, I really do believe if it wasn't for Justice's pure speed and abilities, we might not average 400 yards a game on offense (we're at 523 right now). Finally, we can't seem to figure out how to stop the outside blitz. Even with our OL sees a DB or LB creeping up... they don't block'em.

Anyway... if I do the KU game and future games, I'll add the new video(s) here so I don't keep making new threads. Again, I'm doing this via my iPhone. So not great video quality or editing.

 
Last edited:
Feb 27, 2018
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#2
From Mark Cooper...

STILLWATER — For once, Oklahoma State thought it had it figured out.

The offensive line, a position group criticized for so many years, was one of the reasons to be optimistic about this team in the preseason. Coach Mike Gundy said he would be “shocked” if, by Oct. 1, it wasn’t better than it has been recently. Combined with an embarrassment of riches at running back, Taylor Cornelius would have stability around him as he settled in at quarterback.

“I would say now, if I was a gambling man and I was to bet on it,” Gundy said Monday, “then I would have probably lost my money at this point, where we’re at.”

Here in mid-October, as Oklahoma State tries to get back on track following two losses in three weeks, focus turns back to the offensive line. Cornelius has improved over the past two weeks, throwing eight touchdown passes. But in the 48-42 loss Saturday to Iowa State he was, as Gundy put it, “running for his life from Day 1.”

Through six games, Oklahoma State has surrendered 18 sacks. It gave up 24 in 13 games all of last year.
 

ScooberJake

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#3
Wow. So much fail. Take the play at 2:57, for instance. No backs, no TEs, just 5v4 on the line. The one DL who is double teamed is blocked effectively. The other three all get through easily with a shot at the QB. I know nothing about line play, but it doesn't look like a strength issue. Just looks like poor technique. Our guys seem to set their feet, get one push, with their hands, then they are done. No driving the defender, no moving feet.
 
Aug 22, 2006
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#4
The outside blitz is stopped by throwing quick slants or tunnel screens, or zone read qb run inside of the blitz. these change the aggressive nature of the defense and an offensive coordinator should have these plays ready as audibles for the QB. Its about reading the defense pre-snap and going away from the pressure. Seems simple because it is simple.
 

osuwhit

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#5
The outside blitz is stopped by throwing quick slants or tunnel screens, or zone read qb run inside of the blitz. these change the aggressive nature of the defense and an offensive coordinator should have these plays ready as audibles for the QB. Its about reading the defense pre-snap and going away from the pressure. Seems simple because it is simple.
We can't seem to understand or commit or figure out that there is the middle of the field and we can throw the ball to our talented receivers there.
 

Darth Ryno

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#6
The outside blitz is stopped by throwing quick slants or tunnel screens, or zone read qb run inside of the blitz. these change the aggressive nature of the defense and an offensive coordinator should have these plays ready as audibles for the QB. Its about reading the defense pre-snap and going away from the pressure. Seems simple because it is simple.
Yep! And Robert Allen was asked why we don't have more short passes/screens in our playbook. He replied "We do, we have plenty." blah, blah, blah
 
Nov 16, 2013
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#7
I agree Darth, the four seconds of holding the ball is killing us. I will use the comparison of the best QB in the NFL right now, one Patrick (I'm better than a BM) Mahomes, when was the last time that dude stood in the pocket for 4 seconds? Where did he learn that? Running for his life at taco tech.
 

Birry

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#8
The outside blitz is stopped by throwing quick slants or tunnel screens, or zone read qb run inside of the blitz. these change the aggressive nature of the defense and an offensive coordinator should have these plays ready as audibles for the QB. Its about reading the defense pre-snap and going away from the pressure. Seems simple because it is simple.
Incorrect. The ONLY way to neutralize the rush/blitz is to have better o-line play. Without it, we simply cannot have success. No plays will work unless our o-line can give the QB 5 seconds. Otherwise we might as well just run up the middle and give up.

/sarcasm
 
Apr 20, 2013
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#9
The outside blitz is stopped by throwing quick slants or tunnel screens, or zone read qb run inside of the blitz. these change the aggressive nature of the defense and an offensive coordinator should have these plays ready as audibles for the QB. Its about reading the defense pre-snap and going away from the pressure. Seems simple because it is simple.
Incorrect. The ONLY way to neutralize the rush/blitz is to have better o-line play. Without it, we simply cannot have success. No plays will work unless our o-line can give the QB 5 seconds. Otherwise we might as well just run up the middle and give up.

/sarcasm
I thought you were serious until the 'No plays will work...' sentence.
 
Sep 23, 2018
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#10
For those that have watched the replays..do we ever have a "hot" receiver/route designed to help the qb out incase things break down? To me is just seems our "hot" route is chunking in deep or scrambling but I haven't watched any tape
 

Birry

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#11
For those that have watched the replays..do we ever have a "hot" receiver/route designed to help the qb out incase things break down? To me is just seems our "hot" route is chunking in deep or scrambling but I haven't watched any tape
I'm sure the deep pass is one of the hot reads. Gundy has mentioned before that "good things usually happen when we throw it deep". Meaning that more than 50% of the time, we either get a PI call, win the 50/50 jump ball, defender mis-plays the ball, or there's a coverage bust. I'm sure the read is to take on step and lob it up if the outside receiver is single covered or pressed at the line. From a season-long analytics standpoint, Gundy probably isn't wrong to think we could make that a bread and butter play. I don't think it works against the teams we'd need it to work against in order to play for Conf. Championships or beyond.

But I also don't think he or many of the older fans care as long as we get our 9 wins and Camping World Bowl.