NY AG: NYPD Should Stop Making Traffic Stops

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Nov 6, 2010
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#41
If it’s deaths we are worried about (I.e. traffic stops where the offender gets violent and is killed or kills LE), wouldn’t allowing the roads to become the Wild West result in exponentially more deaths due to speeding, DUI, etcetera? The only thing I’m really in disagreement with is the use of K-9s or an officer’s sense of smell for probably cause. In fact I might say the car searches should only be allowed if there’s a warrant attached.


Isn't that already the case?? I'm pretty sure you can refuse to allow your car to be searched even if they have "probable cause" to pull you over and give you a sobriety test.
 

oks10

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Sep 9, 2007
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#43
Them checking on insurance protects me and my investment in my car and the cars sitting on the shoulders slows the flow of traffic, which makes it safer.
These aren't cop cars. They're a contracted private company, so no, it doesn't slow the flow of traffic. I'm not against checking for insurance, but they've picked a particularly unsafe way of doing it. I'm honestly surprised I've only seen 1 with damage from getting rear-ended so far given the spots they pick sometimes.

Something I've always wondered though is how people are able to renew their tags every year (well, assuming they actually renew them) with no insurance. Do they just get a policy for a month when they renew and then cancel it until the next year? Seems like they (government) could act on that somehow when people repeatedly cancel insurance policies. I'm not sure what that would look like, but I would think with our current technology there'd be an easy solution for knowing who does and doesn't have insurance coverage on a vehicle that they have registered with the state.

And just to be clear, I'm not saying that we need police to get off the streets (and I don't think that's what Donny is saying either) but there's many instances where they're at least appearing to be policing for revenue, not for safety. If the goal is safety then the long term end goal should be zero revenue because you've actually corrected all of the safety issues. You can't possibly convince me that's the case.
 

snuffy

Calf fries are the original sack lunch.
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Feb 28, 2007
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#44
These aren't cop cars. They're a contracted private company, so no, it doesn't slow the flow of traffic. I'm not against checking for insurance, but they've picked a particularly unsafe way of doing it. I'm honestly surprised I've only seen 1 with damage from getting rear-ended so far given the spots they pick sometimes.
I did not Dali ever they were a private company., thank you for the info.
Something I've always wondered though is how people are able to renew their tags every year (well, assuming they actually renew them) with no insurance. Do they just get a policy for a month when they renew and then cancel it until the next year? Seems like they (government) could act on that somehow when people repeatedly cancel insurance policies. I'm not sure what that would look like, but I would think with our current technology there'd be an easy solution for knowing who does and doesn't have insurance coverage on a vehicle that they have registered with the state.
But they you have the concern over overreach/invasions. I know it can be done because it is done with tote to note car lots, but the buyer agrees to it. Maybe the law needs updated.

And just to be clear, I'm not saying that we need police to get off the streets (and I don't think that's what Donny is saying either) but there's many instances where they're at least appearing to be policing for revenue, not for safety. If the goal is safety then the long term end goal should be zero revenue because you've actually corrected all of the safety issues. You can't possibly convince me that's the case.
I agree, but sometimes the way to get people to act in a safe manner is through their pocket book. I think it is crap that they can have written me a ticket for seatbelts, but paying it did change my mind.

But I agree 110% it is a slippery slope and I am glad they have cracked down on towns that are ticket traps to fund local politics, like Hall Park in Norman and Vally Brooke in OKC.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
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#45
Are not most of the speed traps and law enforcement issues we are discussing here controlled by local and state law? Making this really an issue of local and state councils, the people you know on a first name basis or live in the same neighborhood with.

Speed traps, even on the interstate that I've seen were because of a local law not a state law.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#46
Anyone in favor of traffic stops has clearly never been to Yale, Hulbert or Stringtown Oklahoma.
Great straw man.

Abuses of traffic stops need to be continuously looked at. Pointing out abuses, in the millions of traffic stops that occur every year & calling for an end to them altogether, is obviously one of the stupidest points ever attempted on the internet, & there are alot of those.

So, congratulations! Besides hosting alumin parties, you're in an elite group!
 

OrangeFan69

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#48
I've received tickets in 2 of those 3.
Yale - between Tulsa and OSU
Hulbert - between Tulsa and Tahlequah
Stringtown - between Tulsa and Dallas - I believe there was a court case that prohibited the city from writing tickets, because it was such a speed trap that the revenue was such a significant portion of the budget.
 

OrangeFan69

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#49
I actually like police. It is a difficult and necessary job, but it becomes a million times more difficult when police departments take advantage of the public trust and authority the general public needs to cede to them. I don't expect cops to be perfect. I do expect them to try their best and be accountable.

I think it's horsescrap that we load cops with so much equipment that they look like an occupying force. I also think when police (or any municipal employee for that matter) doesn't live in the area they are working. Their salary becomes a municipal wealth transfer and creates an outsider's mentality. Neither are healthy.

Also, both roofers and landscapers die on the job more often than police officers. These are facts from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It's a difficult job, but I feel America needs to relax on the hero worship.
 
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Nov 8, 2007
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#50
Stringtown - between Tulsa and Dallas - I believe there was a court case that prohibited the city from writing tickets, because it was such a speed trap that the revenue was such a significant portion of the budget.
Correct. The state actually disbanded the Stringtown police department in 2014 because of the percentage of the city's revenue that was coming from speeding tickets.

I'm not sure when it got reinstated, but I see a Stringtown PD the majority of the time when I pass through now.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
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#51
I actually like police. It is a difficult and necessary job, but it becomes a million times more difficult when police departments take advantage of the public trust and authority the general public needs to cede to them. I don't expect cops to be perfect. I do expect them to try their best and be accountable.

I think it's horsescrap that we load cops with so much equipment that they look like an occupying force. I also think when police (or any municipal employee for that matter) doesn't live in the area they are working. Their salary becomes a municipal wealth transfer and creates an outsider's mentality. Neither are healthy.

Also, both roofers and landscapers die on the job more often than police officers. These are facts from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It's a difficult job, but I feel America needs to relax on the hero worship.
All of these issues concerning the police are local issues. Your neighbors and friends you elect to local office write these laws. They are the ones who approve of the purchase for "equipment", they are the ones who decide who they hire, etc.