#NotTiredofWinning

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Nov 6, 2010
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#42
As I suspect Trump supporters would say, "He may be a moron, but he's our moron!"
I'm glad this is being brought up, because let me be the first to admit I am most certainly a moron on this issue. However, I'm finding it hard to see fault in the strategy of Trump on this one, and I can't stand the guy. My basic understanding is yes, prices will go up, however, is that not a good thing when we are getting clobbered by an infinite pool of extremely cheap labor in the case of China?? Meaning more American products will be competitive, and thus more jobs for American workers?? It seems to me that the normal "tariffs are bad" logic may not apply just given the sheer size of China, and how far from behind they are coming with regards to standard of living/wages. I remember when the same things were being said about Japan and cheap labor, etc, but Japan is a tiny country, and their standard of living and thus wages caught up and even surpassed the US very quickly. China is just on a different level.
 

UrbanCowboy1

Some cowboys gots smarts real good like me.
Aug 8, 2006
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#44
Don't like Trump. Never have, never will. But I 100% agree with his stance on China negotiations. I've been absolutely FLOORED by his international dealings as I was so sure he was going to fall flat on his face. But he's doing the exact right thing with China. Things that should have been done in both Republican and Democrat administrations over the past 18 years. He's putting the screws to them and he understands the most important fact about international trade that everyone seems to have forgotten: The world needs us more than we need the world. I'm not saying we're completely independent of the global economy, but we are still the indispensable nation. And we don't need to be punitive towards anyone, either, but we simply can't allow ourselves to be taken advantage of anymore. I'm so tired of the US subsidizing the world and being told we don't do enough.

Long story short: we are the ones holding the cards. We need to start playing like it.
 
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Jul 20, 2018
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#45
Don't like Trump. Never have, never will. But I 100% agree with his stance on China negotiations. I've been absolutely FLOORED by his international dealings as i was 100% sure he was going to fall flat on his face. But he's doing the exact right thing with China. Things that should have been done in both Republican and Democrat administrations over the past 18 years. He's putting the screws to them and he understands the most important fact about international trade that everyone seems to have forgotten: The world needs us more than we need the world. I'm not saying we're completely independent of the global economy, but we are still the indispensable nation. And we don't need to be punitive towards anyone, either, but we simply can't allow ourselves to be taken advantage of anymore. I'm so tired of the US subsidizing the world and being told we don't do enough.

Long story short: we are the ones holding the cards. We need to start playing like it.
I don't know of very many people that particularly like Trump as a person. He is, however, the perfect person for our current situation.
 

SLVRBK

Johnny 8ball's PR Manager
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Oct 16, 2003
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#47
To China specifically, China's fear of tariffs is that their rise has been driven by cheap manufacturing. As their economy has improved the cost of manufacturing has also risen making China not as competitive as they used to be, China used to have 50% of global apparel manufacturing and it is now approx. 20%. Add tariffs increasing the cost of goods made in China and you see increased incentive for manufacturers to move, Vietnam is gaining a lot of interest in the last 5-10 years.

Losing market share in manufacturing is what China fears, it is the reason for their rise and central to the governments long term plans. That's why the Chinese government has had a decades long focus on stealing Western Technology to jump ahead rather than developing through their own R&D.

I was at a dinner two weeks ago with some gents involved in the global steel business and was told there is $20B in investments for new/upgraded plants in the US waiting to see if Trump is reelected.
 
Nov 6, 2010
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#48
To China specifically, China's fear of tariffs is that their rise has been driven by cheap manufacturing. As their economy has improved the cost of manufacturing has also risen making China not as competitive as they used to be, China used to have 50% of global apparel manufacturing and it is now approx. 20%. Add tariffs increasing the cost of goods made in China and you see increased incentive for manufacturers to move, Vietnam is gaining a lot of interest in the last 5-10 years.

Losing market share in manufacturing is what China fears, it is the reason for their rise and central to the governments long term plans. That's why the Chinese government has had a decades long focus on stealing Western Technology to jump ahead rather than developing through their own R&D.

I was at a dinner two weeks ago with some gents involved in the global steel business and was told there is $20B in investments for new/upgraded plants in the US waiting to see if Trump is reelected.
And this is where I wish Trump would be more open minded and nuanced regarding the immigration/wall issue. Why Vietnam as opposed to El Salvador or Guatemala?? Some of that low end manufacturing is just never going to come back to the US, but why not work towards making Central America a more favored trading partner and stem the flow of desperate people with actual economic incentives to stay home?
 

SLVRBK

Johnny 8ball's PR Manager
Staff
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Oct 16, 2003
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Katy, TX
#49
And this is where I wish Trump would be more open minded and nuanced regarding the immigration/wall issue. Why Vietnam as opposed to El Salvador or Guatemala?? Some of that low end manufacturing is just never going to come back to the US, but why not work towards making Central America a more favored trading partner and stem the flow of desperate people with actual economic incentives to stay home?
Asia represents about 60% of the global population and Eurasia, the shared landmass of Europe and Asia represents over 70%. As far as global supply chain/future markets companies need to be there...the US is the biggest single market but we are not the only market.

I'm not talking about only US companies relocating manufacturing to low cost countries, even Chinese, Korean and Japanese companies are putting operations there.
 
Nov 16, 2013
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tractor
#50
He loves to take credit for stuff he really didn't have anything to do with.


Though he sure as hell won't take the blame for the stuff that is directly his fault and is actually holding us back.


I know he is a politician now, that is what they do. Although he is also a moron who doesn't understand any of this. That is the really scary part.
The stuff about the farm economy has been happening for years. I personally have made more money on cattle than I have in five years. Wheat prices suck ass, but that happens with commodities. You can't count on $10 a bushel anything.
 

Rack

Federal Marshal
Oct 13, 2004
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#51
And this is where I wish Trump would be more open minded and nuanced regarding the immigration/wall issue. Why Vietnam as opposed to El Salvador or Guatemala?? Some of that low end manufacturing is just never going to come back to the US, but why not work towards making Central America a more favored trading partner and stem the flow of desperate people with actual economic incentives to stay home?
I think the fact that many of US/Japanese cars, specifically, are manufactured in Mexico already and yet millions still stream in, is one reason. https://nissannews.com/en-US/nissan...s/videos/nissan-mexicana-aguascalientes-plant

Certainly we need our neighbors to the south to be our trading partners, we just need them to also stem the tide of illegal (not legal) immigration. This is so we can process and vet people and makes sure we aren't ONLY getting the dregs that can't get jobs in other countries that do exist. It's a quandary, you under enforce and you flood your workforce here with low cost labor, you over-enforce and you look like an uncaring heel. One must convince the public that it's best for all countries/people involved to be more organized and nuanced in our immigration. This is the rub.
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
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#52
And yes far right wing Republicans who love their party more than the country, the rule of law, and the Constitution I hardly recognize. It is no longer the Republican Party I've known all my life but a wholly owned subsidiary of Trump.
The Republicans moved to the center, not the right, and Trump wasn't the cause of the move, he is the result of it. Conservatism is all but dead in the GOP and the voters lashed out at the establishment, we got Trump. Unfortunately, in their blind rage, the Rep voters nominated yet another moderate, but at least this time they nominated one who is definitely NOT a part of the GOP establishment the way Bush, McCain and Romney are/were.

The funny thing is if the Dems weren't so crazy insane over Trump in his first term, I bet he would be MUCH more pliable to work with them on more left moderate items if he wins a 2nd term (he IS a moderate after all). My fear from the start is that Trump would support some kind of Dem sponsored assault weapons ban in a 2nd term (since he won't have to worry about re-election) but the bitterness between him and the Dems might just last long enough to prevent any kind of cooperation at all.
 

Rack

Federal Marshal
Oct 13, 2004
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#53
The Republicans moved to the center, not the right, and Trump wasn't the cause of the move, he is the result of it. Conservatism is all but dead in the GOP and the voters lashed out at the establishment, we got Trump. Unfortunately, in their blind rage, the Rep voters nominated yet another moderate, but at least this time they nominated one who is definitely NOT a part of the GOP establishment the way Bush, McCain and Romney are/were.

The funny thing is if the Dems weren't so crazy insane over Trump in his first term, I bet he would be MUCH more pliable to work with them on more left moderate items if he wins a 2nd term (he IS a moderate after all). My fear from the start is that Trump would support some kind of Dem sponsored assault weapons ban in a 2nd term (since he won't have to worry about re-election) but the bitterness between him and the Dems might just last long enough to prevent any kind of cooperation at all.
This is true, however, I don't fear a moderate Trump as I think that Trump is the one who will finally get us transportation infrastructure without tax increases. Which I believe we are severally behind on.

Bottom line, Trump IS very much, a centrist...hes just an a-hole know it all or they might just possibly work with him now if they weren't so partisan and he didn't constantly open his pie hole.

Centrist Trump -
Reduced troops in Iraq and Afghanistan
Set up meetings with North Korea and started talks of peace
Fights for Union workers and wants to bring back manufacturing
Fights to steam the tide of illegal low income workers who take blue collar jobs from Citizens.

Hes' certainly not far right...although he is right leaning and a nationalist. In fact, that is what I like about him.
 
Nov 16, 2013
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tractor
#54
No doubt Trump is not a normal conservative, but that's ok. The globalism that is so loved by our "ruling" class has cost us billions. Trump has got that correct.
 
Oct 29, 2016
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#55
Anyone with a lick of knowledge regarding unemployment rate will know the "official" number is utter nonsense. We need to stop focusing on the official number (plz read article)

Also, Trump hasnt won a damn thing..and honestly, Trump has accomplished zilch, nada, no matter how hard a propaganda spewing machine tries to convince you. If you believe otherwise, there's no question you are a willing recipient of such hogwash.

Here's why (why the official number is BS). Please take time to actually read:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/qz.com...nding-americans-to-a-much-darker-reality/amp/
 
Jul 20, 2018
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#56
Anyone with a lick of knowledge regarding unemployment rate will know the "official" number is utter nonsense. We need to stop focusing on the official number (plz read article)

Also, Trump hasnt won a damn thing..and honestly, Trump has accomplished zilch, nada, no matter how hard a propaganda spewing machine tries to convince you. If you believe otherwise, there's no question you are a willing recipient of such hogwash.

Here's why (why the official number is BS). Please take time to actually read:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/qz.com...nding-americans-to-a-much-darker-reality/amp/
Duh. The population is aging and baby boomers are retiring. You simply can't handle the fact that Trump is successful. You would rather the U.S. were a shithole like Venezuela.
 

kaboy42

Territorial Marshal
May 2, 2007
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#57
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/tr...victed-of-killing-iraqi/ar-AAB0tf3?ocid=ientp


Trump pardons former Army Ranger convicted of killing Iraqi

8 hrs ago

© Vanessa Gera/AP, FILE 1st Lt. Michael C. Behenna, left, and his defense attorney Capt. Tom Clark, right, walk in Camp Speicher north of Baghdad, Iraq, Sept. 21, 2008.


President Donald Trump has pardoned Michael Behenna, a former Army Ranger in the 101st Airborne Division convicted of murdering an Iraqi prisoner in 2009.

Behenna, 35, was sentenced to 25 years in prison for "unpremeditated murder in a combat zone" after killing suspected al-Qaeda terrorist Ali Mansur. Behenna was paroled in 2014.

While Behenna said he killed Mansur in self-defense, during the trial he admitted that he disobeyed orders to return Mansour to his village after he was released from military intelligence and questioned about his connection to an explosion that killed two U.S. soldiers.

Prosecutors said Behenna instead interrogated and stripped Mansour naked before shooting him twice.

Behenna's trial raised the support of fellow soldiers.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders wrote in a statement that upon his release from jail in 2014, "Dozens of Patriot Guard motorcycle riders met Mr. Behenna to escort him back to his home in Oklahoma." She added that "Behenna's case has attracted broad support from the military, Oklahoma elected officials, and the public" and he was a "model prisoner."

But questions have been raised about Behenna's claim of self-defense.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike sent a letter to Attorney General William Barr earlier this year urging the Trump administration to consider a pardon for Behenna.

In a statement, Behenna thanked the president "for his act of mercy."

"Although this is a time of great joy for my family, we as a country must never forget Adam Kohlhaas and Steven Christofferson and all those who gave their lives in service of this great nation," Behenna said, referring to his comrades killed during combat. "They represent the finest of our society, and their families will forever be in our thoughts and prayers."
 
Nov 6, 2010
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#58
I think the fact that many of US/Japanese cars, specifically, are manufactured in Mexico already and yet millions still stream in, is one reason. https://nissannews.com/en-US/nissan...s/videos/nissan-mexicana-aguascalientes-plant

Certainly we need our neighbors to the south to be our trading partners, we just need them to also stem the tide of illegal (not legal) immigration. This is so we can process and vet people and makes sure we aren't ONLY getting the dregs that can't get jobs in other countries that do exist. It's a quandary, you under enforce and you flood your workforce here with low cost labor, you over-enforce and you look like an uncaring heel. One must convince the public that it's best for all countries/people involved to be more organized and nuanced in our immigration. This is the rub.
I don't think Mexico is really the issue anymore, it is all about the Central American countries. They are so small that a little bit of industry would make a huge difference there. I know the perception is that every one of them would rather be here in the US, but having new family in El Salvador, I can tell you that is not the case. They just need economic opportunity and a bit more security/stability and the current immigration issue would be gone.
 

OSUCowboy787

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Dec 31, 2008
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#59
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/tr...victed-of-killing-iraqi/ar-AAB0tf3?ocid=ientp


Trump pardons former Army Ranger convicted of killing Iraqi

8 hrs ago

© Vanessa Gera/AP, FILE 1st Lt. Michael C. Behenna, left, and his defense attorney Capt. Tom Clark, right, walk in Camp Speicher north of Baghdad, Iraq, Sept. 21, 2008.


President Donald Trump has pardoned Michael Behenna, a former Army Ranger in the 101st Airborne Division convicted of murdering an Iraqi prisoner in 2009.

Behenna, 35, was sentenced to 25 years in prison for "unpremeditated murder in a combat zone" after killing suspected al-Qaeda terrorist Ali Mansur. Behenna was paroled in 2014.

While Behenna said he killed Mansur in self-defense, during the trial he admitted that he disobeyed orders to return Mansour to his village after he was released from military intelligence and questioned about his connection to an explosion that killed two U.S. soldiers.

Prosecutors said Behenna instead interrogated and stripped Mansour naked before shooting him twice.

Behenna's trial raised the support of fellow soldiers.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders wrote in a statement that upon his release from jail in 2014, "Dozens of Patriot Guard motorcycle riders met Mr. Behenna to escort him back to his home in Oklahoma." She added that "Behenna's case has attracted broad support from the military, Oklahoma elected officials, and the public" and he was a "model prisoner."

But questions have been raised about Behenna's claim of self-defense.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike sent a letter to Attorney General William Barr earlier this year urging the Trump administration to consider a pardon for Behenna.

In a statement, Behenna thanked the president "for his act of mercy."

"Although this is a time of great joy for my family, we as a country must never forget Adam Kohlhaas and Steven Christofferson and all those who gave their lives in service of this great nation," Behenna said, referring to his comrades killed during combat. "They represent the finest of our society, and their families will forever be in our thoughts and prayers."
Now he needs to pardon the Navy Seal falsely accused of doing the same and awaiting trial.

https://taskandpurpose.com/video-clears-navy-seal
 

kaboy42

Territorial Marshal
May 2, 2007
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#60
Also, Trump hasnt won a damn thing..and honestly, Trump has accomplished zilch, nada, no matter how hard a propaganda spewing machine tries to convince you. If you believe otherwise, there's no question you are a willing recipient of such hogwash.
Supreme Court Justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch say "hello", while I say "neener-neener" and wallow with the other hogs/deplorables in a rather decent economy and jobs market. ;)