North Korea and United States Summit

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
51,253
17,779
1,743
#43
Apologies if you guys have seen the Fox News video of when Obama wanted to meet w/ North Korea. I know it's been making the rounds a bit.
https://twitter.com/nowthisnews/status/1006563778018721792
Well of course they didn't like it, he was out of his league. Look how Iran made a fool of him!
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
51,253
17,779
1,743
#46
This is the video President Trump shared with Chairman Kim at the historical Singapore Summit...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVVFARIR0Tc
 
Oct 7, 2008
1,050
237
693
#47
The fantasy that Obama could ever have a day like this is summed up in the first word of Erickson's tweet; IF. :lol:
Seems to me everyone is rushing to either declare this some sort of momentous occasion or a great capitulation by one of the world's great powers to a tiny dictator state. At this point it's not much more than an elaborate PR stunt, until we see action from either side at least.

1994-2002
In 1994, North Korea agrees to halt the construction of two reactors the United States thinks could be used as part of a nuclear weapons program. Instead, according to the agreement, an international consortium is supposed to replace the plutonium reactors with two light-water reactors and the United States agrees to supply 500,000 tons of heavy fuel oil every year during the construction period.

Besides the United States, South Korea, Japan and a European agency form an organization tasked with implementing the accord.

But when George W. Bush becomes president in 2001, the United States walks away from talks with North Korea over concerns that Pyongyang is running a clandestine program. The North ultimately confirms that program’s existence in 2002, rejecting further negotiations, kicking out inspectors and doubling down on its efforts at a time when the United States is preparing its Iraq invasion.

2005
In August 2003, the United States decides to participate in new negotiations with North Korea — the “six-party talks” — alongside China, South Korea, Russia and Japan. Two years later, in February 2005, Pyongyang suspends its involvement in the negotiations, citing U.S. conditions and resistance. After a restart in summer 2005, it again takes only 13 days for negotiations to derail.

2006
Despite suspending its involvement in the talks several times that year, North Korea agrees to end its nuclear weapons program only about half a year later, in September 2005. But once again, North Korea suspends its participation in the talks over U.S. sanctions. Soon thereafter, in October 2006, it launches its first nuclear test.

2007-2008
In 2007, six-party talks resume and North Korea later agrees to major concessions. Some steps are taken to follow through on its promises, but then North Korea rejects U.S. verification methods and violates its own promises, causing the breakdown of negotiations once again.

2009-2010
North Korea rejects U.S. and South Korean promises during new talks. Tensions with South Korea escalate after it accuses the North of having torpedoed one of its navy ships in 2010. Dozens of South Koreans die in the attack.

2012
Weeks after Kim reaches a deal with the United States to suspend its nuclear weapons program, North Korea launches a long-range rocket, causing the agreement to fall apart. The following year, North Korea also cancels scheduled family reunifications ahead of South Korean and U.S. joint military drills.

2015
North Korea rejects any future talks on suspending its nuclear weapons program. After almost being drawn into an open military conflict, North Korea and South Korea engage in talks that quickly fall apart.

2016
In July, North Korea signals that it is willing to negotiate, but subsequently launches a number of missile tests. Tensions further escalate in 2017.

Last month’s Korean summit meeting may have been an unprecedented show of their willingness to keep talking for real, but North Korea’s track record shows how quickly Pyongyang’s mood can swing.
 
Jan 11, 2010
14,720
29,086
743
On the highway to heck
#48
Seems to me everyone is rushing to either declare this some sort of momentous occasion or a great capitulation by one of the world's great powers to a tiny dictator state. At this point it's not much more than an elaborate PR stunt, until we see action from either side at least.

1994-2002
In 1994, North Korea agrees to halt the construction of two reactors the United States thinks could be used as part of a nuclear weapons program. Instead, according to the agreement, an international consortium is supposed to replace the plutonium reactors with two light-water reactors and the United States agrees to supply 500,000 tons of heavy fuel oil every year during the construction period.

Besides the United States, South Korea, Japan and a European agency form an organization tasked with implementing the accord.

But when George W. Bush becomes president in 2001, the United States walks away from talks with North Korea over concerns that Pyongyang is running a clandestine program. The North ultimately confirms that program’s existence in 2002, rejecting further negotiations, kicking out inspectors and doubling down on its efforts at a time when the United States is preparing its Iraq invasion.

2005
In August 2003, the United States decides to participate in new negotiations with North Korea — the “six-party talks” — alongside China, South Korea, Russia and Japan. Two years later, in February 2005, Pyongyang suspends its involvement in the negotiations, citing U.S. conditions and resistance. After a restart in summer 2005, it again takes only 13 days for negotiations to derail.

2006
Despite suspending its involvement in the talks several times that year, North Korea agrees to end its nuclear weapons program only about half a year later, in September 2005. But once again, North Korea suspends its participation in the talks over U.S. sanctions. Soon thereafter, in October 2006, it launches its first nuclear test.

2007-2008
In 2007, six-party talks resume and North Korea later agrees to major concessions. Some steps are taken to follow through on its promises, but then North Korea rejects U.S. verification methods and violates its own promises, causing the breakdown of negotiations once again.

2009-2010
North Korea rejects U.S. and South Korean promises during new talks. Tensions with South Korea escalate after it accuses the North of having torpedoed one of its navy ships in 2010. Dozens of South Koreans die in the attack.

2012
Weeks after Kim reaches a deal with the United States to suspend its nuclear weapons program, North Korea launches a long-range rocket, causing the agreement to fall apart. The following year, North Korea also cancels scheduled family reunifications ahead of South Korean and U.S. joint military drills.

2015
North Korea rejects any future talks on suspending its nuclear weapons program. After almost being drawn into an open military conflict, North Korea and South Korea engage in talks that quickly fall apart.

2016
In July, North Korea signals that it is willing to negotiate, but subsequently launches a number of missile tests. Tensions further escalate in 2017.

Last month’s Korean summit meeting may have been an unprecedented show of their willingness to keep talking for real, but North Korea’s track record shows how quickly Pyongyang’s mood can swing.
Too bad Zero never had the stones to meet Kim face to face and bow to him in person. Rudyard Kipling never met Zero or his poem "If" might have had a whole new context. Like it or not, Trump (as insufferable an ass as he is) has been immeasurably more successful that Obama ever was. This NK thing can fall apart tomorrow and Trump's efforts will still be historic. And Obama's, not so much......at anything. We'll just have to agree to disagree on Obama's value to any thing American other that being the first African American elected President. That, and that alone (and it is of vital importance) is the sum of his Presidency imo.
 
Last edited:
Jan 11, 2010
14,720
29,086
743
On the highway to heck
#50
Ok I know the point of this and that people didn’t like when Obama bowed but this is really stupid. In half the pictures he isn’t bowing and are you kidding me that’s Chris Christie on the right and he’s just doubled over laughing. Good lord.
Lol! Yeah, I couldn't find a bowing collage without Christie in it. Kinda ruined the moment. :)
 

CowboyOrangeFan

Mmmm, yeah.
A/V Subscriber
Jun 9, 2006
4,673
3,416
1,743
Florida
#52
Ok I know the point of this and that people didn’t like when Obama bowed but this is really stupid. In half the pictures he isn’t bowing and are you kidding me that’s Chris Christie on the right and he’s just doubled over laughing. Good lord.
Don't bother. They don't care. Discredit one piece of propaganda and they will just move on to the next. There is an endless supply of that shit online. You can never win.
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
26,509
15,272
1,743
Stupid about AGW!!
#53
Seems to me everyone is rushing to either declare this some sort of momentous occasion or a great capitulation by one of the world's great powers to a tiny dictator state. At this point it's not much more than an elaborate PR stunt, until we see action from either side at least.

1994-2002
In 1994, North Korea agrees to halt the construction of two reactors the United States thinks could be used as part of a nuclear weapons program. Instead, according to the agreement, an international consortium is supposed to replace the plutonium reactors with two light-water reactors and the United States agrees to supply 500,000 tons of heavy fuel oil every year during the construction period.

Besides the United States, South Korea, Japan and a European agency form an organization tasked with implementing the accord.

But when George W. Bush becomes president in 2001, the United States walks away from talks with North Korea over concerns that Pyongyang is running a clandestine program. The North ultimately confirms that program’s existence in 2002, rejecting further negotiations, kicking out inspectors and doubling down on its efforts at a time when the United States is preparing its Iraq invasion.

2005
In August 2003, the United States decides to participate in new negotiations with North Korea — the “six-party talks” — alongside China, South Korea, Russia and Japan. Two years later, in February 2005, Pyongyang suspends its involvement in the negotiations, citing U.S. conditions and resistance. After a restart in summer 2005, it again takes only 13 days for negotiations to derail.

2006
Despite suspending its involvement in the talks several times that year, North Korea agrees to end its nuclear weapons program only about half a year later, in September 2005. But once again, North Korea suspends its participation in the talks over U.S. sanctions. Soon thereafter, in October 2006, it launches its first nuclear test.

2007-2008
In 2007, six-party talks resume and North Korea later agrees to major concessions. Some steps are taken to follow through on its promises, but then North Korea rejects U.S. verification methods and violates its own promises, causing the breakdown of negotiations once again.

2009-2010
North Korea rejects U.S. and South Korean promises during new talks. Tensions with South Korea escalate after it accuses the North of having torpedoed one of its navy ships in 2010. Dozens of South Koreans die in the attack.

2012
Weeks after Kim reaches a deal with the United States to suspend its nuclear weapons program, North Korea launches a long-range rocket, causing the agreement to fall apart. The following year, North Korea also cancels scheduled family reunifications ahead of South Korean and U.S. joint military drills.

2015
North Korea rejects any future talks on suspending its nuclear weapons program. After almost being drawn into an open military conflict, North Korea and South Korea engage in talks that quickly fall apart.

2016
In July, North Korea signals that it is willing to negotiate, but subsequently launches a number of missile tests. Tensions further escalate in 2017.

Last month’s Korean summit meeting may have been an unprecedented show of their willingness to keep talking for real, but North Korea’s track record shows how quickly Pyongyang’s mood can swing.
Per Trump

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1006837823469735936
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
26,509
15,272
1,743
Stupid about AGW!!
#54
NK state media reporting that Trump made several concessions to the dear leader which mostly line up with what Trump had said in his presser.

They report that Trump agreed to abide by a principle of step by step and simultaneous action for peace, stability, and denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula (in the past Pompeo has argued that only rapid denuclearization total and complete would be what the US would offer and that a stepped approached has been used by other admins in the past which has failed)

The NK state media also said that Trump conceded to suspend military drills with SK and lift the sanctions on NK. (Some experts in China have said this move was "too good to be true" and will cause Asian ally countries to lose confidence in Washington and move them toward greater diplomacy with China)

The NK state media also said that Trump offered NK security guarantees that are indispensable precondition of nuclear disarmament

China Foreign Minister Rep Geng Shuang applauded the summit and called for the UN to ease sanctions on NK as a reward for progress.

https://www.npr.org/2018/06/13/6194...s-you-won-t-find-in-the-joint-statement?sc=tw
 

kaboy42

Territorial Marshal
May 2, 2007
7,097
8,033
1,743
#55
Soooo in essence North Korea leveraged nuclear capabilities for being pulled out of the dark ages by the US?

Have they been promised an NBA team? AND can we relocate those asshat Warriors? PLEASE!